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Full text of "Lucky Bag"


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RICHARD E. SMITH 
Editor-in-Chief 

RICHARD D. ROBERTS 
Business Manager 











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Til I SI T I ON 











Ihroughout his four years the midshipman follows a well planned 
routine. The strict discipline of this routine distinguishes our life from 
that of civilian colleges and universities. From Plebe year and the learn- 
ing of what it means to obey, to First Class year and the administration 
of the Brigade; we are progressively given more responsibilities and 
duties. Thus we undergo the transition from civilian to officer. Academics, 
athletics, extracurricular activities — all are a part of our training and a 
part of our lives as midshipmen, a part of the lives of the Class of 1956. 



I 




UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY 

Through study and practical instruction to provide the mid- 
shipmen with a basic education and knowledge of the 
naval profession; to develop them morally, mentally, and 
physically; and by precept and example to indoctrinate 
them with the highest ideals of duiy, honor, and loyalty; 
in order that the naval service may be provided with grad- 
uates who are capable junior officers in whom have been 
developed the capacity and foundation for future develop- 
ment in mind and character leading toward a readiness 
to assume the highest responsibilities of citizenship a 
government. 




DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER 



Commander in Chief 



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CHARLES E. WILSON 

Secretary of Defense 





CHARLES S. THOMAS 
Secretary of the Navy 








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Chief of Naval Operations 



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Dominating the Academy scene, the Chapel raises its green dome and golden 
spire to the skv. It stands a constant reminder of the universal Power felt by all 
those who sail the seas of the world. In the services beneath this dome we came 
closer to God. and to the "peace that the world cannot give." 



CHAPEL AND CHAPLAINS 



Chaplain Zimmerman 




Chap 


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Father IV 




From the Jimmy-legs and his lonely vigil in the Rotunda 
to the continually busy galley cooks, the civilians make our 
lives more comfortable. The corridor boys keep the hall 
clean, the store employees keep us in cigarettes and other 
articles, the tailors press our uniforms, the laundry cleans 
our clothes, the seamstresses take the place of our mother 
when we lose buttons, and the file clerks keep us posted on 
the many things that are always happening. To these and 
many others we say, "Thanks." 





16 




ACADEMICS 



W&3?£lf% 




JAMES M. TAYLOR 

SECTION EDITOR 



Certainly not the least of the many facets of life at the 
Naval Academy is the academic side. Some ten hours 
of the typical midshipman day is spent in the classroom or 
in preparation for recitations. It is in the laboratories 
and classrooms, where scientific and literary inquiry 
are nurtured, that foundations are laid for the professional 
Navy men of tomorrow. The Fleet of today does not possess 
the simplicity of the wooden ships of yesteryear. 
Mechanics, electricity, electronics, and now, nucleonics are 
by-words of its existence. To meet the challenges of the 
complexities oi the modern Navy midshipmen work for the 
degree of a Bachelor of Science. Secure in their knowledge 
of their chosen profession they move on to lace the 
responsibilities of the Service. 






Capt. E. S. Miller, USN 
Executive Officer 



Reading on a future occupation 



EXECUTIVE 



"Exec" — this group, which kept "Mr. Gish" under constant surveillance, was the watch- 
dog of military living and discipline here in Bancroft Hall. In their repertory of offenses 
there were multitudinous reasons why so many mids should spend Saturday afternoon 
marching on the terrace rather than enjoying themselves at the drag house. The most 
capable agents of this department were the twenty-four company officers who were always 
ready with a word of advice on aptitude or disciplinary matters. Not to be outdone, this 
department contributed generously with leadership, Navy Regs, and Naval Law to the 
already groaning bookshelves found in any Bancroft room. 



The really stiff one — watch squad inspection 







"Skinny" r<> tins department all too many former 
classmates bowed in surrender. The subjects here- were 
rather difficult, ranging from tin- intricacies of qualitativi 
analysis to the complexities of electronics. Chemistry, 
physics, electricity, and electronics occupied fully the rum 
of the budding young engineers of '56. Armed with a num- 
ber of well equipped laboratories, the professors not only 
preached the theory but also showed the results. Its system 
r.t educational television can well be the envy of many 
other colleges and universities. Most important of all here 
the system of scientific inquiry was given to our group. 

Peek a-boo in Physics lab 



24 




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Ca^. £. H. Dale, USN 
Head of Department 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 




The biz moment — will it work? 



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Capt. R. B. Madden, USA 
Head of Department 



Tip- 

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MARINE ENGINEERING 



.in inside look 








"Steam" — for four years the profs talked about the 
magic of it; yet, any mid will vouch that it was just so much 
hard work. Who would say otherwise with engineering 
drawing, boilers, basic mechanisms, auxiliary machinery, 
fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, ship construction, and 
internal combustion engines to master? The laboratory 
periods gave the average mid an increasing appreciation of 
the completeness and complexities of the models and in- 
stallations in this department. Other practical aspects were 
not lost as many engineering watches were stood on sum- 
mer cruises. 

Steve couldn't draw a straight line before this 





Hold that horsepower, George 



27 




SEAMANSHIP AND NAVIGATION 




Capt. J. S. Lewis, USN 
Head of Department 



"Seamo" — those sea-going scholars who most enjoy see- 
ing the results of today's studies today found this depart- 
ment to their liking. To the most ardent tars in the Brigade 
this was evidenced in practicing navigation, station keep- 
ing, and communication drills during our summer cruises 
and YP drills first and second class years. From our first 
introduction to "Shorty" to our last maneuvering board 
problem, this department mixed practical work with class- 
room instruction and lectures to prepare us for "taking the 
conn" in the Fleet. 



"First ya gotta get the 






Capt. A. R. Gallaher, I SX 
Head of Department 



Adding the Third Dimension 



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"Math" this department seldom threw ;i curveball 
without giving the equation for ir. If you could remember 
tin- integral of 3x*sin 20dG. <>r the way an overloaded 
bridge should collapse, there was smooth sailing. The "slip 
sru-k" \\:is .1 mill's right arm and woe to the man who did 
not master its intricacies, llu- Math people were so "gung- 
ho" they never even named their buildings you guessed 
it they numbered them. 






A pointer or an Irish setter? 



Red alert, guns free 



"Ordnance" — as the weapons of modern war have 
steadily improved, so they have steadily increased in com- 
plexity. This fact was more than once driven home as radar 
and fire control systems baffled the midshipmen. Learning 
by doing during many hours in the mounts on cruise and 
dowm by the seawall was alternated with classroom in- 
struction to give us the knowledge to "fight the Fleet." 



ORDNANCE AND GUNNERY 




Hot on the competition 





Capt. H. E. Baker. USN 
Head of Department 



31 








"Bull" many claimed this was the most aptly named 
academic group. From the classics to the moderns, from 
Alexander the Great to Halsey and Nimitz, from stock 
values to speech techniques, the profs sought to leave us 
with a greater knowledge of the humanities. Their maxi- 
mum effort was expressed in the form of an extensive first 
class research paper. However, diplomatic history and orig- 
inal writing were often a welcome relief from the world of 
electricity anil tire control formulae. 



Capt. B. J. Harrai, I S.\ 
Head of Department 



ENGLISH 

HISTORY AND 
GOVERNMENT 





"Gentlemen, money is merely a medium of exchange 

Throning the Bull 



•'Political up! 



tot infrequent" 



32 





Obsolete, everywhere except Annapolis 



"Aviation" — the classroom was even taken into the wild 
blue yonder of the skies above Annapolis. Regular flights 
alternating with indoctrinating lectures were held during 
the Fall of first class year. The objective of the course 
was not to make midshipmen aviators; rather it was 
designed to impress sailor men with the extensive part air- 
craft play in Naval warfare. Then too, for the future fly- 
boys it was a tempting taste of what was to come. 




AVIATION 





Atlantic City, here we come. 



Capt. W. T. Shields, USN 
Head of Department 



33 




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//rW 0/ Department 

Salty language in a foreign tongue 



\ .f 0/ r^ (fay a /a Espanol 

"Dago" just a short walk across the Yard and it 
smiucl we wire in another land Portugal, Germain, 
France, Russia, Italy, or Spam. Yet some mids will sav ir 
was more like out of this world. Nonetheless, the Navy's 
increasing role in shaping our nation's foreign policy spot- 
lighted this department's efforts to give us a working 
knowledge of a foreign language. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 







"P.T." — the uninitiated may call this by its proper 
name, but it was physical torture to many a mid. By way 
of proof, the obstacle course and second class swimming are 
recalled. Fullv three of the four years were devoted to pass- 
ing the ingenious set of physical proficiency tests designed 
by this department. The profs fondest wish was that mids 
would carry the desire to be physically fit into their future 
lives. On one item this group takes pride — no non-swim- 
ming sailor is graduated from the Academy. 






PHYSICAL 



TRAINING 



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Capt. C. E. Loughlin, USN 
Head of Department 



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The multi-rigors of the program 






35 





Capt. J. N. C. Cordon, MC, I S\ 
Head of Department 



"Hygiene" most civilians would be amazed h\ the 
scope of a mid's academics over four years — who would 
have guessed that hygiene was a "must" course. It is the 
only course required by Congress to he taught to midship- 
men. Main an hour was spent exploring the inner workings 
and hidden mechanisms of "the human machine." As if 
taking it once weren't enough, the Class of '56 had the 
dubious distinction of being the only class to have hygiene 
two years in a row. However, contrary to general com- 
ment, we did not receive M.D. degrees upon graduation. 



HYGIENE 




From Manuscript to Finished Product 






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The HUMANMACHINE 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 



U.S. Nav* iAc 



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SECTION EDITOR 



Our four years — an interlude in our lives, yet a lifetime in themselves. 
In retrospect they present a strange picture, the time appeared both infinite 
and instantaneous. The first days of Plebe summer seem like yesterday, 
yet then it took an eternity for time to pass. 

Four years of transition — from adolescence to manhood, from civilian to military. 
It was these years that will influence us every day of our lives. 

Our career as a Midshipman was a study in contrast — each day monotonous 

in its unvarying routine, yet each day different. Each day was filled with a myriad 

of problems, gripes, and laughs, hut in some way, each day was memorable. 

We can never forget our classmates, both those who graduated, and 

those we left behind. We entered iioo strong, yet graduated less than 700. 

To some, this is nothing but an attrition statistic -the bilgers, the men 

who resigned, the victims of circumstance compiled into a nc.it number, 

but they, along with the graduates, comprise our friends, our 

roommates, and — our memories. 




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EPARTMENT OF THE NAVY 

3UREAU OF NAVAL PERSONNEL 
WASHINGTON 25. D. C. 



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BEGINNING 



Spring of 1952 was one filled with anxiety for the would 
be members of the class of '56. "Will I get an appointment ? 
Will I pass the entrance exam? Will I pass the physical?" 
These were the big questions. For many the answer was 
no. Then came the final letter, "You are hereby directed 
to report . . ." Our worries were over, or so we thought. 
Then, for several weeks, there were people to congratulate 
us, people to tell goodbye, girls to date, plans and promises 
to make before leaving. Those few days were long — and 
yet, short. 

All over the country we were packing, catching trains, 
planes, and busses. All roads led to Annapolis, bringing 
sailors, marines, soldiers, college men, and high school 
boys. Some were scholars while others were not. The 
majority of us would remain all four years but we knew 
that some would leave before then. However, with an 
eagerness to begin our new way of life, we arrived on 
June 30, 1952. 






Dahlgren Hall was our first stop once we got inside the 
yard. There, we found the Ensigns of the Class of '52 
ready to get us started on the busy day that lay ahead of 
us. We covered many miles of the corridors of Bancroft 
Hall drawing gear, getting that "haircut," and generally 
getting settled. We wondered if we would ever be able to 
get around these same corridors without the help of a 
guide. As we formed up to march to Memorial Hall for the 
swearing-in ceremony we suddenly realized that there was 
an odd feeling in our stomachs. After months of planning, 
hoping, and waiting we were finally about to begin our 
carters. \\ e were given a tew minutes to tell our families 
goodbye and then sent to our rooms to decide how to get 
ever) rbmg into a seemingly too small locker. The following 
two months were the busiest of our lives. We marched, we 
changed uniforms, we learned to sail, we changed uni- 
forms, we learned to fire small arms, we changed uniforms, 
we went to lectures. By the end of the summer we had 
learned to w aste no time. 



'56 comes aboard 



'/, Joe Gish, having been appointed a midshipman 



42 




THAT FIRST DAY 






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Attention to otdcts 



CHANGE 01 ( (HIM AM) 




The class of '56 weren'l the only new peopli to join the 
Vcademj during the summer of 1952. We nor :i new super- 
intendent, Admiral CI urner Joy. Admiral 1 1 ill wished us 

luck, read his orders, and we had a new, and very senior, 
member of our class. 

The rirsr ol many famous people who were ro visit us 
came during this rime and made us that much more proud. 
The nanus of a king, a prince, and admirals entered our 
letters home and served ro impress us of the importance of 
a strong Naval Service. 

We were very proud and slightly cocky when the sum- 
mer ended and the Brigade returned . . . 



"Sir, I rel ev ' vow." 



46 





Food fit for a king 



Friends from home 



PLEBE YEAR 





The inevitable come-around 



'Stand Navy down the field 







"EVES IN HIE BOAT" 

"SOUND OFF, MISTER" 

'FIN OUT" 

AH right Mister, nose against the mirror 






■ 






Sirrr, there are now 10 minutes 



Wipe it off, Mister 



It fell on us like a ton of bricks — the upperclass returned 
and we rapidly came to the full realization of what the 
word "Plebe" meant. Come-arounds, questions, and ath- 
letics filled our days, with the added attraction of aca- 
demics filling our free time. The breaks came with the post 
football game liberties — the Plebe's only chance. The only 
chance except for those who learned to make the most out 
of that monument of ingenuity, the "Tea Fight." 

Still, we managed to make the best of it all, and even 
had our share of laughs. We carried on from after the Army 
game (Phil Monahan was our hero in that 7-0 score) until 
our first Christmas leave. As we heard Christmas carols 
coming from the radios of the upperclass rooms we dreamed 
of the nights when we would soon be home. 

Can it be true? 




But, sir! 





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Our first Color Parade 



\t'ii i Christmas came exams. Spring leave, and, sooner 
than we thought possible, the end was in sight. June Wick 
arrived and the upperclass forgoi us in favor of more en- 
joyable nit i-rt-srs. For most of us it was a week of rest and 
preparation for cruise; but tor tin- more enterprising who 
managed in get their drags in town early it was a busier 
week. 

File climax centered around the Farewell Hall and grad- 
uation. Despite tile crowd, our first bop was a thrill and 
us the feeling of advancing from the lowly Plebe state. 

I he following day. as rhe Class of '53 threw their caps 
in the air. we cheered and took off for rhe Herndon Monu- 
ment, which had been thoughtfully greased for us the night 
before. The cap was placed on the top and we became third 
classmen. 



Another first — 1953 Farewell Ball 






YOUNGSTER 

The first day started early — 0400 reveille — and proved to 
be a busy one. The last goodbye with the O.A.O. just be- 
fore embarkation, said to the strains of music by the Naval 
Academy Band, ended all too soon as we boarded motor 
launches and headed for the cruise ships. But the day had 
only started! After we reached Norfolk and the NROTC 
Mids had come aboard, we experienced the first in a long 
series of evolutions known as "working parties." We must 
have reprovisioned the ship from the keel up that day! 

Another day in N 
liberty was like, an 
long weeks. 





Meaning the bilges -from both sides! 



Throwing the lead 



Chipping paint, cleaning bilges, and standing watches 
occupied <>ur time. Plentj of hard work, but still we had 
our laughs and made many new Friends as well. Shipboard 
life was different to say the least, ami it took a little time 
i.' I' .on how t<> keep food on our trays in a rough sea, and 
a little more time to learn how to keep it in our stomachs. 

Hut the routine varied radically on the 19th of June, as 

the Joll) Roger flew from the mast and we crossed the 

Equator. It was a funnj and somewhat painful experience, 

but afterwards I" 1111 Pollywog Mids emerged as Shellbacks. 




POLLYWOGS 10 




GIVE ME 




LIBERTY 



BARBADOS 
TRINIDAD 



COLOMBIA 




CURACAO 
PANAMA 



'Let's see, four pesos is one dollar, and . . ." 

Even side-boy duty can be good 




You find M ids in the strangest places! 




Diving jot pennies — a hard way to make a buck 






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GTMO 
& LEAVE 



Guantanamo Bay — four days of gunnery practice in the 
daytime and cold beer at night! Liberty wasn't much at 
Gtmo, but it was relaxing and provided us with plenty of 
time for "bull sessions" over many cans of two-for-a- 
quarter beer. For the few of us that still had any money 
left, Gtmo was a wonderful place to do that last minute 
shopping. The big item, of course, was perfume perfume 
for the girl at home, tor your mother, for anyone, just don't 
pass up the bargain! 

Hut Guantanamo was just a stopping place; the big 
attraction was leave, only a few days off, bur a luetic few 
days, which included our introduction to tin- inevitable 
\1'V! We hauled seabags, luggage, ami everj thing else 
from tin- cruise ships u> the ' \l' Vs. boarded, and stood in 
line for chow. \tn r what seemed like an eternity, \nnap- 
olis loomed into view, we caught a glimpse of the Chapel 
Dome, and after a restless night headed tor the beach. 

\liei more lugging our seabags around ami standing in 
more lines, we were tree free t" go home lor thirtj .1 
with an abundance ol sea-stories ti> till our families, our 
friends, and, ol course, our girls. 




There goes my Cadillac! 




Who says it doesn't get hot in Gtmo? 



Won't be long now. 




i 



YOUNGSTER YEAR 



LAST... 
UPPERCLASS! 





y l o« r ' 



■ p.adi° 





Christmas Hop 

The first part of Youngster Year was a transition period — we knew 
we weren't Plebes but it took a while to get used to the idea of being 
upperclass. But as we began to exercise the new rates we accustomed 
ourselves to the "comforts" of upperclass life. 

We had been promoted to MOD watches, complete with those con- 
venient desks to lean on — if you didn't get caught. Spirit through the 
football season was higher than in any other year of our four here, 
and the novelty of the "over the wall" pep rally was introduced. Our 
first experience with the Aviation Department was a rude awakening, 
coming in the form of a ride in the "Dilbert Dunker" on what seemed 
like the coldest day of the Spring. 

June Week came and we relaxed for a pleasant week with the 
O.A.O., marred only by the fact that -after having carefully greased 
the Herndon Monument for the class of '57, we were forced to clean 
it again — but not before we left a cap on top to save the new third 
class the trouble! 



$?^£^>%&$£:< 







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£i*£ \ Gr eece c°' 




61 




SECOND (LASS 



Cum*"** 



Second class summer was the one in which we ac- 
quired the greatest stock of memories, and the greatest 
store of information for sea-stones. It seemed as though 
we were constantly carrying our luggage somewhere. 
Little Creek for TRAMID; USNA for "Yellow Peril" 
lessons; Patuxent for sights of things to come, and jet 
hops; Philly for fire fighting; and finally, Carrier Cruise. 

We lived out of our seabags, and handbags, logged 
many miles on busses — but most of all — we had a ter- 
rific time. Liberty every night, plus three weekends, 
gave us time to do what we pleased — and we did. 

We saw more, and learned more in that two month 
period than any other of our Academy career. We can 
honestly state that this was our finest summer. 











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"77; ( - &<■// /7/j, i»r r/ic/r locker is way too small." 



Break between battles 



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Following on the heels of a busy June Week, Tram id was 
upon us. with hard work in the day and good liberty at 
\ irginia Beach in the evening. The first ten days were 
tilled with amphibious landing drills, climbing down cargo 
nets, driving landing craft, and lectures in Sheldon Theater. 

< >ur training was put to use when we boarded APA's and 
various landing craft, and prepared to make two landings 
on the beaches south of Little Creek. The weather was had 
and the water rough but the maneuvers went on as sched- 
uled providing both interest and a few laughs despite 
those armored beasts called LVT's! 



Keeping in shape for liberty 





Hitting the beach in front of one thou- 
sand spectators, Kaxdets, newsreels, 
andT.r. 



64 



TRAMID I 







The TRAMID Ball; blind drags, and White Service 





\\ e received our first true taste of Navy Air aboard the 
"Happy \ alley," and the "Flying A." and it was a very 
pleasant taste indeed. Though only three weeks long, we 
managed to do and learn a great deal. Liberty in Halifax 
introduced most of us to Canada, and the people made us 
welcome by giving a dance in our honor almost every 
night. We repaid some of their hospitality by marching 
in the Canadian Navy Day parade -in the rain. 

Carrier Cruise was the climax of the summer, and the 
lack of annoying jobs, no midwatches, and the chance to 
flv off the carrier made it the best cruise of our four vears. 




"All Midshipmen lay topside to observe flight operations." 



Ship's reading room 



66 




Wings over the fleet 




Flight deck intermission 




Yellow Peril Ac 



"The brown bag is on your It-it." 

ISNA...PAX 
PHILLY... 

Flying \\ ;is the goal c>( tin- summer and fly- 
ing we did during our ten day stay at the 
Academy. The fact that the N3N "Yellow 
Peril" was tar removed from modern jet air- 
craft didn't detract from the rlirill of flying 
a plane ourselves. 

Our three day visit to NATC Patuxent 
gave us an insight into Naval Aviation and 
what to expect m the future. Entertainment 
was found in the heer fests at the PX, and at 
the picnic at the "O" club. 

We found Philly to he the same great lib- 
erty town, and the tours of the Navy installa- 
tions interesting during the Philadelphia 
phase of the summer, complete with a dav at 
fire-fighting school and a look at the "human 
centrifuge." 

Fire-fighters! 




Pre-fiight briefing 




Plebe summer picnics 


were never like this 


MMi I M^^» A " 






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SECOND CLASS YEAR 



5 iC 




The come-around- but this time we are on the other end. 



The preliminaries to a victory over Army. 




At last— The pay raise! 



Lcdr Morris — a great bandleade 
and a great man — retires. 



70 



Being a second-classman wasn't an easy job as we soon 
learned. Studying consumed an amazingly large amount of 
our time, and to many of us it seemed as though the aca- 
demic departments were plotting against our whole class. 

Hygiene was easier the second time around and Skinny 
lab was good for a laugh — if you had a weird sense of 
humor. 

Running Plebes proved to be a new pastime, coupled 
with the power of the come-around. 

Some of the more memorable events of the year were the 
visit of the Queen Mother; the retirement of Lcdr. Morris; 
and of course, beating Army. 

However, the word for the year was "work," and work 
was what we did. 




Something for the future — the model 
of the field-house started in 1955. 




Fortv-eight flags from the DAR 




Educational, adventurous Skinny lab — you 
never knew what would happen next. 



71 




''-V8SZ-&* 




<lVhen*°J, c 




VSSA «» 




Ring-tappers, at last! 











This one is for the scrapbook. 



"Blue and Gold" played by Claude Thornhill. 




The Ring Dance — second in importance only to gradua- 
tion! 

We had logged many hours time with our rings on during 
study hours from when we got them the 1st of April, but 
now we could show the world. The day itself was a hectic 
one, trying to get our drags settled in the June Week 
house, getting the pictures in the Ring for the scrapbook, 
and still being ready for the dinner early that evening. 
After dinner we went to Smoke Hall to dance to the soft 
music of Claude Thornhill. Those who tired of dancing 
found excellent entertainment in Smoke Park by the 
"Diplomats." 

Romantic music, a beautiful girl, the traditional kiss 
when we received our rings — these made the Ring Dance 
the most memorable event of our days at the Academy. 



73 




Something worth waiting for! 



74 




FIRST CLASS 



(fattee 



June Week was here and gone before we knew it, and 
again it was "down to the sea in ships" for the class of 
'56. By now, of course, we were old sea dogs, or such was 
the impression we tried to give the new third-class. The 
goodbyes toourgirls were just as short and the boat ride 
to rhe ships anchored in the Bav just as long as they had 
been two years before. 

But once aboard things seemed somewhat different — 
we staked our claims to the good racks and lockers, and 
working party ceased to be the nemesis we remembered. 
In Norfolk there was liberty, such as it was, and we met 
a few old R. O. friends; and then we were off on a . . . 





Fostering international relations 





Old World culture; as spell- 
binding today as then 




In sunny Spam — Mids still meet American girls 



Passing through the Straits of Gibraltar was a memo- 
rable event, but hitting the beach in Spain after two weeks 
at sea was the big thrill — whether it was in Barcelona, 
Valencia, or Malaga. There was plenty to do and see in all 
the ports and the tours to Madrid and Seville were an 
added attraction, well worth the price. 

The food was good, the champagne cheap, but you had 
to watch out for the olive oil. Other than the senontas, the 
big attraction was Spain's national pastime — the Bullfight! 




Wine, wine, everywhere, and not 
a drop to drink 




"Trabaja El Burro Siempre 




Plymouth, Portsmouth, Torquay, and Wey- 
mouth were the English ports of call — but all roads 
led to London during our weeklong stay in the 
British Isles. The beautiful scenery, the great city 
of London, and the friendly people were outstand- 
ing features of our visit — not to mention that 
great English institution, the "pub"! 

In London everything centered around Pica- 
dillv Circus, the British version of Times Square, 
and the center of the night life. For the sightseers 
there were many points of interest — from the 
Tower of London to the "Windmill," and from the 
wax museum to the subways. The four-day tours 
to London were good liberty for all hands, and 
gave us some pleasant memories and interesting 
stories to talk over during the next two weeks at 
sea. 



05TuMp H ,p£L 



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A busman's holiday 





ill 


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a* 9 Hi 





'Gee, don't they ever smile?" 




"I'll write every day, and don't lose my anchor. 



81 




END OF 
CRUISE 



A .1/ id S til 




Sunset,Gltno and one more week 








/?«<•£ \ i /• .-(v jawi goodbye to the c 

R. ().' s and then . . . 



Crabtozvn, disembarkation, and leave-! 



m 



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■"■*! 




FIRST ClASS YEAR 



84 




New Responsibilities 

We returned from summer leave much as we 
had in the past three years, but there was still an 
intangible difference. We started the last lap, had 
more rates, more privileges and most of all, a 
great deal more responsibility. We were no longer 
the followers in the Brigade, we were the leaders. 
Our biggest responsibility was the new plebes, and 
we knew that their entire academy and military 
lives would be greatly influenced by us — their 
hrstclassmen. 

Football season led off the year's activities 
with spirit running high, and a good team running 
hard. The pregame trips were as long as ever, and 
the postgame liberties were better than ever, 
especially noteworthy on both counts was the 
mass movement of the Brigade to New York City 
for the Columbia game, 

The innovation of theater size television in 
Mahan I I. ill provided us with a top game even on 
the weekends we stayed home. 

Ilmi weekends a semester, coupled with daily 
Mum wire a vast improvement over the previous 
years. But most of all it was the feeling oi nearing 
the end of a long road the wonderful feeling of 
approaching our coveted goal. 



On to the Columbia game, via the New York subway. 




Prince Albert of Belgium gels help on 

Skinny from Merrill. 






Weekends and overnights provided pleasures not 
found at Bancroft. 



'Now Mr. Kelly, when I was a Plebe 



...and New 
Rates 



First Class haven, the coffee mess. 



The power of the Form 2. 





This year's Spring Purge- brought about 
Friday night Field days. 



"But the Reg Book saxs . 




S6 





WOtA 



And we thought we could bsllo 



The wrinkles were easier 
to get this year. 



Cluck — cluck, cluck. 





Rear Admiral Smedbcrg takes over as Admiral Boone gets promoted to Full Admiral 





How maux days? 



i^j&s' 



Spring fever of 1956 was a severe epidemic for our class. 
The "big day" drew near as the day counters reached the 
two digit numbers, and we began to face a few of the first 
problems and decisions of our careers. 

There were uniforms, cars, and insurance to bu\ and 
weddings to be planned by many of us. Everyone had their 
worries hut even they were enjoyable for, if nothing else, 
they were signs of long awaited independence. 

Study effort reached an all time low and day-dreaming 
was the favorite pastime. As the days grew fewer, chey 
seemed to grow longer; we wondered if the time would 
ever pass, bur finally it did and we entered our ktsr exam 
week, with lime Week 1956 uisr annuid tin- corner. 





ROGER S. BETTS 



SECTION EDITOR 



Spirit is that intangible possession that is part of 

athletics — on the gridiron ... on the court ... on the track . . . 

on the fields of intercollegiate competition, the Naval 

Academy was represented by teams of high caliber, and 

most notably, by teams of high spirit. The record 

books are the logs of Navy ability — but behind the statistics, 

there was maximum effort. Countless hours of practice 

and honest sweat and hard work — from the players, from 

the coaches, from the managers, and from the men 

who "warmed the benches" — combined to produce teams 

unexcelled in spirit and will-to-win . . . the teams that wore the 

Blue and Gold. This is a success story of mediocre 

teams and championship teams; teams that always played to 

the best of their abilit\ — we were behind them, win or lose. 





. 



■&■'- 



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■ - £ 4 - S - 32^ 3B 8S 8? -47 70 34 






NAVY FOOTBALL SQUAD— 1955 
Front Row: George Welsh, Earle Smith, Pat McCool, Wilson Whitmire. John Hopkins, Vernon Dander, Jim Hower, Dick Guest, Ron Beagle. 
Second Row: Don Jahn, Jim Rover, Anthony Anthony, Tony Stremic, Gus Prahalis, Bill Leslie, Bill Mohn, Jim Baker, Ed Malynn, Chet Burchett. 
Third Rozo: Jim Owen, Charles Boyle, Tom Lace}-, John Witzmann, Vince Monto. Pete Jokanovich, John Ruth, Paul Gober', Jim Martinez, and 
Charles Curtis. Fourth Row: George Warren, John McHugh. Ron Baker, Bill Meisel, Jim Wood, Bob Caldwell, Angus McEachen, Dick Snyder, 
Bob McElwee, Charles Levis. Fifth Row: Wayne McKee, Ed Oldham, Pat Flood, AlexLupfer, John Russell, Tom Forrestal, Sheldon Groner', Jim 
Barker, and George Thomas. 



The class of '56 was privileged to be part of one of the greatest four year 
spans in Navy history. From 'S2-'SS, Navy teams rolled up 24 wi/is against 9 
losses and 4 ties — including 2 victories over Army. Who will forget that 7 to 
victory plebe year — or our 27 to 20 win over the K-dets in '54 that ranks with 
the greatest games ever played — or the Sugar Bowl triumph over Mississippi — 
or the "luck of the Irish" win that Notre Dame eked out in '54, 6 to 0. These 
were green years in Navy football — and we were part of them. 

"We've lost a lot, but we haven't lost what it takes to win" — so spoke 
Coach Eddie Erdelatz at the beginning of the 1955 football season. The "lost 
a lot" part of that statement refers to 18 lettermen who had helped to make 
the previous season, the "Sugar Bowl Season," one of the most successful in 
years. The proof of the latter part of the statement comes with the results of 
the '55 season — a season which saw two Navy men named as AU-Americans; 
a Navy QB establish records as the nation's top yardage gainer and college 
passer; a season which saw Navy rise as high as 4th in the national standings 
and finish among the top 20 teams in the nation for the second year in a row 
with a 6-2-1 record that stood for another memorable year in Naval Academy 
football history. 




Coach Eddie Erdelatz and 
Captain John Hopkins 



FOOTBALL 



93 




Navy possessed a great passing combination during the 
fall of '55, flu- greatest in Navy Football historj "Welsh 
to Beagle." George Welsh, named on several Mi-American 
squads and selected as the outstanding pla) er in the annual 
post-season North-South All Star game, continuously 
amazed us, and the opposition, with his nerve, assurance, 
and all around genius. I lis ball handling and al>dirv to run 
the spht-T option plays made him one of tin nation's best. 
lie wrote his name memorabl} in the nation's Football 
record book by completing 63' , ol Ins passes to become tin 
pass-throwing champion of major college football in 1 
Mis 1318 yards gained made him the fop offensive yardagi 
gainer in the nation. Credit Coach ErdelatZ with calling 
George, ''the finest college quarterback I have ever seen." 
Superlative ability classed him as the greatest quarterback 



m Navy Football history. 

Ron Beagle, unanimous All-American pick, called bj 
several the most outstanding end in college football and 
perhaps most significantly, called by Coach Erdelatz, "a 
great pass catcher, a great blocker, a great tackier, hut 
most oFall, a great guy." became one of Navy's greats with 
bis play at end. Ron was among tin- leaders in college pass 
receiving in addition to being outstanding defensively, or 
,,s one sportsw titer phrased it, "there's only one thing 
better than Beagle offensively and that's Beagle defen- 
sively." Named in 1954 as the recipient of the Maxwell 
I rophj as the "outstanding player of the year," two time 
All- American Ron Beagle and his number 80 carved a 
permanent niche among Navy football immortals. These 
two men were part of the Navy team. The 1955 season 



THE NATIONAL COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC BUREAU 









94 






Oldham, goes wide around end 



A muddy Thompson Stadium gridiron was the setting for the debut of the 
Eddie Erdelatz coached Blue and Gold gridders. After 10 plays and 87 yards, 
with the clincher a Welsh to Jim Barker pass, Navy held a 7 to lead over 
underdog William & Mary. Navy had scored the first time they got the ball, 
before an annual homecoming crowd. With mud as the dominant factor, the 
game ended, almost as it started, with a 7 to victory number one. 

Victory number two came a week later against South Carolina in a driving 
rain. Despite the elements, Navy played a "dry field" game with the passing 
offensive primarily responsible for a 26 to shutout over the Gamecocks. A 
stiff defense complimented by a Welsh to Beagle aerial touchdown pass, and 
goal line crossings by Vince Monto, Dick Guest, and Pat Flood, made the 
nation's sportswriters take notice of a coming Navy football team. 




Hoppy coming up — but not needed 



Ned Oldham gathers 
one in against 
William y Mary 





tf *••■ 



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Yardage coming up downfield blocking clears the •.cay- 
John Russell moves toward a Duke opening 

Hie highlight <>t the '5? season came the next Saturday 
in Baltimore as Navy established itself as one of the na- 
tion's top elevens with a resounding 21 to win over a 
rough, tough Pittsburgh nam. later ranked as the best in 
the East. \lthough Navy pushed a bigger Pitt line around 
all afternoon and scored three times, it was the team's de- 
fensive play that tamed rhe Pur Panther. The defense was 
superb onlj twice did Pitt penetrate Navj territory 
gaining only '■'' yards against a fighting forward wall and 
against .c secondary that hardly had to function. Pitt tried 
to pass seven times, but six tunes never got the ball oft 
before rhe rushes of the "Navy line. The one pass that did 
gi i into the air was intercepted by linebacker Angus Mc- 
Eachen. Dick Guest hit paydirt twice and shared rhe offen- 
sive spotlight with Georgi Welsh. 

Vfter what seemed to be a serious injury in the third 
quarter, George was carried off the field before a hushed 
crowd. A few minutes later, rhe inspirational lift of the 
season came when he returned to action to a roar from the 
midshipmen stands that shook the girders of Municipal 
Stadium. 



The defense that held Pitt scoreless 



96 



L -v 



*. 




--•». 



■— EW 



Z)/c^ Guest hits paydirt for six against Pitt 



Welsh paraded the offense 96 yards for the initial score, 
passing the final 7 yards to end Jim Owen after using 17 
ground plays to set up the payoff play. In the third quarter, 
fullback Guest climaxed a 43 yard march with a 3-yard 
plunge behind guard Tony Stremic and tackle Pat McCool. 
With Pitt punting from their goal line midway in the final 
period, Earle Smith blocked the kick and Ron Beagle 
covered it on the 3 yard line. Four plays later, Guest 
scored his second of the afternoon off the Navy left side. 
Ned Oldham added the three extra points. 

It was an All-American team win. 




Top-level conference 




97 




Perm State became the first team to score against Navy 
in '55 as they drove 45 yards to paydirt late in the 1st 
period. The State College tans were not destined to 
Nittany Lion upset however, as George Welsh threw two 
T.D. passes and set up three others as part of a 15 lor - 11 
pass completion afternoon. 6 pninj; to Ron Beagle. \t the 
final whistle, it was 54-14. Navy, ami the rirst time since 
'45 that Navy had won the opening 4 games of the season. 
Hick Guest cracked over tor two scores, one from one yard 
out and the other on the end of a Welsh-thrown screen 
pass. George added one himself and Ned Oldham scored 
on a 4 yard rush tor Navy's opening score. The longest 
scoring play of the season came on a second half Welsh to 



Chet Burchett 67 yard pass-run down the sidelines. Navy 
rosi to 4th place in the national standings. 

I In debut ol quarterback I om Forrestal came a week 
later againsi Penn in Philadelphia. W ith the regulars taking 
a test. Tom directed Navy to a 33 to win over the 
Quakers, granting them only one first down, while the 
Navy offense was rolling up 21. Two scores came despite 
fumbles on the goal line. Chet Burchett knifed over right 
guard for the first T.D., the officials awarding a touchdown, 
ruling that his fumble 1 came after the goal line crossing. 
Ron Beagle similarly scored after a diving catch of a For- 
restal pitched aerial had caused him to fumble in pay dirt. 




diet Burchett scores 
fumbles — T.D. Navy! 



One week later at South Bend, Indiana, it was Navy vs. 
Notre Dame. Line play was the difference as the Irish 
chipped away at the Navy forward wall to roll up 14 of 
their 21 points to break Navy's unbeaten streak. Navy's 
passing attack kept the game tight all the way, keeping 
the pressure on until the final whistle. Twice, Notre Dame 
interceptions stopped Navy scoring threats in the 4th 
quarter, as quarterback Welsh began clicking with his 
passes after the Notre Dame defense had kept Navy deep 
in its own territory during most of the first three quarters. 
Late in the third quarter, passes to Ron Beagle and Pete 



Jokanovich moved the ball to the Irish two. From there, 
Ned Oldham bumped over for the score in the second 
minute of the fourth period culminating a 67 yard march. 
Navy got the ball away from the Irish and started on an- 
other drive with Vince Monto pacing the 51 yard advance 
that was stopped on the ND five with the first of the two 
Irish interceptions. The second came with three minutes 
to play after Welsh to Monto passes had moved the pig- 
skin to the Notre Dame 25. Three minutes later, the score- 
board read: Notre Dame 21,-Navv 7. 



> 








The„pption Play — by George Welsh 

The Duke Blue Devils provided the opposition the next Saturday in Balti- 
more in a defensive battle royal. Four times a first down was missed by less 
than 6 inches with several other first downs going to both teams after the 
yardsticks had been brought out for the necessary measurement. Navy's pass 
defense excelled, denying Duke any yardage through the air, while both teams 
battled to a first half stalemate on the ground. 



99 



J 



The scoring all came in the third period. Navy 
QB George Welsh paraded the offense 84 yards 
with the second half kickoff. The touchdown came 
on a Welsh to Beagle buttonhook pass that capped 
the final 13 yard drive to the end zone. Half hack 
Ned Oldham converted to make it7to0. Six m inure, s 
later, it was 7-7, after Duke had driven hack to 
even it up. Both teams threatened to score in rlu 
4th quarter and provided one of the most exciting 
finishes of the season. With 4rh down on the Duke 
25, Wd Oldham stepped back for a field goal at- 
tempt, but the kick was blocked with 5 minutes to 
play. With 41 seconds remaining, Duke had a 
similar 4rh down situation on the Navy 16. The 
attempted field goal was long enough but not 
straight enough and the score stood at Navy- 
Duke, 7-7. 




Rolling up yards against the Irish 



George Welsh fires toward the- Notre Dame goal line 

mm 





New York City was the setting for a powerful 
Navy attack as the ground and air offense rolled 
up 27 first downs and 598 yards to overwhelm 
Columbia, 47 to 0. Seven scorers rang up the sea- 
son's high with the starters playing less than half 
of the game. Except for one play, the team paraded 
to touchdowns the first five times it got the ball, 
and that play came as the clock ran out in the first 
half. George Welsh made his only appearance in 
the 4th period, when he entered the lineup and 
completed the pass that broke the Navy single 
season passing record. Two of Welsh's strikes were 
good for scores against the Lions to share score- 
throwing honors with Tom Forrestal's dual pay- 
off pitches. Quarterback Gus Prahalis added a 
T.D. pass with Paul Gober and Dick Guest, who 
sewed up scoring honors, getting six points apiece 
via the overland route. Army was next. 

Upsets have been frequent in Army-Navy com- 
petition with season's records only setting the 
stage for form reversals — the 19SS game was to 
be a crushing ground attack against the nation's 
best aerial offense before 102,000 Army-Navy 
rooters in Philadelphia's vast Municipal Stadium. 
The tradition and color began, first the Brigade, 
then the Corps — then the game — 





mm 







Welsh to Beagle — complete! 



Against Columbia — Ron Brence waits for an aerial 




101 



rftmy-Tfavty 



The 1st quarter was all Navy- three Welsh 
passes, two to Ron Beagle and a long loft to Ned 
Oldham, put the ball at midfield following the 
Army kick-off. Paul Gober workhorsed most of the 
way to a first and ten on the Army 12. Dick Guest 
took the delayed pass oft" the option play and Navy 
had a first down on the one yard line. The score 
came on the next play when Welsh sneaked over to 
put Navy in front, 6 to 0. But as the game prog- 
ressed, Army's solid defense ami grinding ground 
offense rook charge and an upset was in the mak- 
ing. Fumbles hurt us significance can In- attached 
to the loss of the ball on fumbles on the Army 34. 
the Army 17, and the Armj 15. The \rm\ scons 
came in the 3rd and 4rh quarters, both after con- 
tinuous overland marches. Tin- final score of the 
1955 Army-Navy Game thus went into tin- record 
books in Army's favor, 14-6. 

Football is a team sport but a team sport in 
winch everyone doesn't get the credit for what flu- 
team accomplishes. The season couldn't have been 
successful without the outstanding play <>l the 
men who open the holes lor the backs linemen 
like Captain and All Eastern Tackle- John Hop- 
kins, Pat McCool, Jim Rover. Win Dander, I 
Stremic. Jim Hower, Wilson Whitmire, Jim Wood 
and the rest of the midshipmen who played on 
the Navy Football Team in ' ;; . 



The Captains meet in midfidd — L~ del and Hopkins 





y 



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AH htjo 










7<& SetfAtw, 



NAVY 


7 


NAVY 


26 


NAVY 


21 


NAVY 


34 


NAVY 


33 


NAVY 


7 


NAVY 


7 


NAVY 47 


NAVY 


6 



WILLIAM & MARY 
SOUTH CAROLINA 
PITTSBURGH 
PENN STATE 14 
PENNSYLVANIA 
NOTRE DAME 21 
DUKE 7 
COLUMBIA 
ARMY 14 



Behind the team — The Brigade 




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80-181 



A' w: Denny Roche, Wally Cox, Bob Peacher, Charlie Swope, Dick \\ lilts. Don Lisa, Leo Hyatt, U<>l> ( irigsby, Km l Gareiss, I «m Pratt. 
Second Rote: led Andrews, Boh Schmidt, Bob Forster, John Conway, ream Cap't. Ron \mon, Jim Gillman, \l Granger, Dale Mcrndon. Walt 
Hansen, Ed Lewis manager Boh Merle. 2 c manager Tom Haven. Dave Mabry, < !eorgc McNulty, Dave Delo, Jim Wilson. Boh 

Johnston. Roc Flora, Tommy Sawyer, Gerry Gentry', J crr y Smith, Jim Durr, Leon Mink. Mike Kelly, ; c manager lack Rcnnie, I m ina 
Steve Gardella. / Ralph Neelj . Hob Kornegay . l'at Doyle, \l ( ir..-s. Wilbur Buck, Jerry Scdor, Ernie Baulch, Dick Carl, Bernie Glea- 

son, Frank Fendler, Reid Olson, Asst. Coach Herman Bushm; officer representative, \sst. Coach Ed Golding, Head 

Coach Sherwood Werner, \s-r. Coach Shel Hirsch, Vsst. Coach Tom Parsons. 



Eastern Intercollegiate Champions that sums up the- 1955 success story 
of the Navy ISO Pound Football ream. Captain Ron Anion and Head Coach 
Sherwood Werner molded a team of "mighty mites" with a desire to capture 
the championship and then paced them through a rugged season that never 
ended until the final minute of play secured that championship. 

At halftime of the final game with Princeton, the score stood. Navy I). 
Princeton 20 and a victory or tie was necessary to win the league crown. 
Boh Forster workhorsed the ball downtield after a Princeton fumble and just 
prior to the end of the 3rd quarter, plunged across for the initial Navy T.D. 
to start the drive back. Ron Anion's two conversions following two 4th 
quarter scores by halfback Forster made it an even game as the clock ran out 
on a 4th Navy drive on the Princeton 12 yard line. Despite the Navy-Prince- 
ton, 20-20 tie, the championship went to the Navy lightweights with a better 
season record. 




Coach Butch Werner and 
Captain Ron Anion 



150 Lb. FOOTBALL 



104 



... A season that opened with a 14-7 decking of 
Rutgers in Thompson Stadium. The following 
week, Bob Forster's 3rd quarter 25 yard gallop 
and a Jim Gillman to Ron Amon pass netted two 
touchdowns to blank Cornell 12 to 0. In New 
York, against the league's newest entrant, the 
Navy ISO's beat Columbia in a scoring field day, 
52 to 0. A Penn fumble, a Saturday later, gave 
Navy the ball for the first time following the kick- 
off, and one play later, the scoreboard read: Navy 
6, Penn 0; the score coming on a Gillman pass to 
end Dave Mabry. Ron Amon's kick was good and 
gave Navy a lead they never relinquished. Follow- 
ing a Penn T.D., a 3rd period 91 yard Navy drive 
to paydirt, capped by Gillman's end sweep for the 
score, made it 13 to 6 and that was the way it 
ended. The stage was set for the tilt with Princeton 
and the subsequent success of the '55 150's — a 
team that made an outstanding mark in Naval 
Academy sporting achievement. 




Ron Amon fights the Rutgers line for yardage 



Charlie Swope moves around end 




EASTERN 
CHAMPS 



105 







- - . •*- 



#» 




'/'/it' Home Stretch 



The sprint for the finish 



CROSS COUNTRY 



The 1955 Cross Country season was a successful one with Navy winning 
three dual meets, outrunning Penn State. Maryland and Syracuse while losing 
only to N.Y.I . and Army. The academy runners placed second to Man- 
hattan in a triangular meet with St. Johns of Brooklyn midway through the 
season. Maryland was edged out In one point in the highlight ol the season's 
running while the West Point team captured the initial Army-Navy Cross 
Country Meet over the North Severn Course in frigid fall weather. 

Walt Meukow was the pacesetter, placing first tor Navy in all ol the tail's 
meets, with outstanding support coming from Scott Chester, Fred Lippert and 
Don Coyne, backed by the other members of the squad in, what most every- 
body will agree, is one of the most gruelling sports in intercollegiate competi- 
tion. 




UAA. 



Captain I'ince Roper and 
Coach Jim Cherdes 



Kneeling: Jack Clay. Bill knodle, Scott Chester, Fred Leppert. Walt Meukow. Vincc Roper. Bill Aldendcrfcr, Don Coyne. Bob Weibly, Bill 
Graham. Standing: Officer Representative, l.t. Col. C. H. Welch, USMC, 2/c Manager Bill Prince. Tom Jacobs. Bill Kallai. Bill Wolff, Dave 
Bertke, Bill Smith. Larry Ingels. 3 c Manager Carl Inches. 1 c Manager Jim McCoy. Coach Jim (ihcrdes. 





/ R Hugo Marxer, Charles Buchanan, Don Stone, Dick Braun, Jim Flatley, Jim Pitney, Don Hanson, Phil Fales. Bill Flight, Pete Fitz- 
william, John Karas. Second Row: Officer Representative, Cdr. H. B. Sweitzer, Manager, Bill Price, Jack Hamilton, Harvey Cameron, Larry Cohen, 
John Newell, Chuck Harlow, Jim O'Connell, Andy Massimino, Dick Hartman, Ass't. Coach J. V. McLernan, Head Coach F. H. "Glenn" Warner, 
Third Row: Dave Cooper, Dick Abel, Jim Wilber, Joe Mayhew, Tom James, Guillermo Zariquiey, Francisco Vainstein, Mike Woodbury, Hector 
Medina, Tom Andrews, Dan Leary, Trainer Bob Byrd. 



Navy Soccer had one of the most outstanding seasons in 
recent years in '55 — a fall that included victories over 
ardent rivals, Maryland and Army, and led to individual 
honors for two of Coach Glenn Warner's squad. Paced bv 
Captain Jim Pitney and AU-Amencans.Pete Fitzwilliams 
and Andy Massimino, the academy hooters dropped only 
three decisions while winning seven and tying one, in an 
evenly matched contest with Princeton that extended into 
two scoreless overtime periods. The road proved to be 
somewhat of a jinx, for it was away games at Yale and 
Pennsylvania that came out on the loss side of the score- 
book. 

Following a season opener victory over Brooklyn College, 
2-1, the squad journeyed to Yale, ranked as one of the 
East's finest. Jim Flatley and Chuck Harlow booted home 
the two Navy scores, which along with Yale's three goals, 
all came in a four minute interval at the close of the third 
period and the start of the final frame. Navy's depth and 
strength came through a week later in one of the season's 
highlights, the 4-1 victory over Maryland. The squad con- 
tinued to look good, rolling up impressive scores in wins 
over N.C. State and Pitt before the scoreless tie with the 
Tigers from Princeton. Bouncing back a week later, Navy 
defeated a good Haverford team, with two of the 4 Navy 
goals coming off the foot of Pete Fitzwilliams and the 
others booted into pay dirt by Jim Pitney and Jim Flatley. 
On succeeding weekends, the team lost to Penn and Penn 
State, though Jim Flatley continued his scoring efforts by 
kicking one past the goalie of the champion Penn State 
squad that won the game by a 3-1 margin. 



SOCCER 



Captain Jim Pitney and Coach Glenn Warner 
hhmhh 




107 







ifTW 
Heads up, in front of the West Point goal 



SOCCER 1955 







ssr 




Jflfi 



Pete Fitswilliams takes one away on a steal 



108 



\ \VY 2 
\ \VY 2 
\ VVY 4 
\ \W 5 
\ VVY 4 
\ VVY 
\ WY 4 
\ \\ V I 
\ \\"V 1 
\ WY 5 
\ WY 3 



BROOKLYN COLLEGE 
YALE i 
MARYLAND 1 
N.C. STATE (i 
PITTSBURGH I 
PRINCETON 
II WERFORD 2 
PENNSYLV \\l A 2 
PENN STATE 3 
SWARTHMORE 4 
ARMY 





Putting the pressure 
on Army. 



Bill Flight broke the scoring column for his second goal 
and a timely penalty kick by Captain Pitney added to the 
Navy total against Swarthmore — a thrilling game which 
went into two overtimes before Navy triumphed, 5-4. Then 
came the season's best game — 

The peak of the '55 season was reached in a sparkling 
performance against Army. Upper Lawrence Field was the 
scene of a fitting climax to the fall as the team beat Army 



for the first time since 1950 — the first time since '56 be- 
came midshipmen. The "perfect play" of the game came 
when Fitzwilhams centered the ball from his outside posi- 
tion to the waiting head of Pitney — the ball sounded on 
the canvas backing of the goal like a shot . . . the end of a 
good season finished in style with a whitewash of West 
Point, 3-0. 




Bill Flight sets up Pete Fitzwilliams for the shot 



109 



BASKETBALL 



Up to 3 March 1956, the Navy Basketball Season 
could have been called average, but on this date, the 
third triumph in four years over Army christened the 
'55-'56 season as successful and nominated the Ben 
Carnevale coached Navy sport as one of the most con- 
sistent Army-beaters in recent years. The season had 
been launched 19 games previous by a squad with the 
usual Navy height deficiency but with a fasr breaking, 
balanced offense and perhaps the best bench of reserve 
strength in several seasons. 

^ oungster Frank Pernios banged in the tirsr basket 
of the season and rang up a personal total of 25 points 
in rhr opining game victory over Delaware. Following 
a defeat ol American 1 .. Navj mack- it three in a row 
with an on-the-road win over Penn in what was billed 
as the initial test of the season. Hie following Saturday, 




Captain Dave Smalley and Coach Ben Carnevale 



the first of what seemed like- bad break ball games came 
up on the Dahlgren Hall court. The first was a last 
second loss to Yale; three points on a foul shot and tap- 
in with one second to go resulted in an 86-85 ^ ale vic- 
tory after Navy had led all the way. The season record 
drifted to 5-2 as the Navy squad dropped a tough game- 
to .i come-from-behind Syracuse rally, following a win 
over Johns Hopkins, Navy laced Columbia. Though 
Petinos maintained Ins high scoring ways in a game 
which was rud IS rimes, Columbia squeezed out a 64-61 
win in a game that could have ended in either team's 
favor. 



!< : : Coach Ben Carnevale, Irani; Petinos, George Bouvct, Captain Dave Smalley, \l Swanson, \ndj Dulilc, Officer Representative Cdr. 
Coleman. Second A' Vsst. Coach Joe Dutf, Ben [*hompson, Larry I li^:i;in-. Hull Mbcrtson, Ron Dressel, Managci Frank Graham. Third Row. 
John Worrell. Ed Clune, Hol> Wilson, Joe Sendek, Larrj Magncr. 




II 1 



1 1 14 




George Bouvet pushes of 



Captain Dave Smalley, notching 26, hit his season's 
high and paced his teammates to the highest team score 
of the campaign in a 92-51 Saturday win over Penn 
Military, a week previous to the season attraction 
against top-ranked Temple. Outgunned, except in spirit, 
Navy dropped a 93-74 contest to the Owls. The low- 
point of the season settled in with the "Dark Ages" as 
the Navy cagers lost the following two ball games to 
Penn State and Maryland. Bouncing back into the win 
column, the team impressively defeated Pitt in one of 
the finest performances of the winter. Frank Petinos' 24 
points led the scorers while Andy Dulik was the floor 
standout in the 81-64 winning cause. The next six games 
of the season ran in a win-lose sequence, victories com- 
ing over Gettysburg, Franklin & Marshall, and Catholic 
University. A tilt with Duke on the road registered in 
the loss column before the win over F.&M. The largest 



Come to Papa 






Frank Petinos 



111 



crowd of the Dahlgren Hall season saw a 4th quarter 
Navy rally fall seven points short of Notre Dame. Two 
weeks later, though outscored by Navy field goals, Man- 
hattan converted enough personal fouls into points to 
best the Navy hoopsters, 93-85. Frank Petinos turned 
in the outstanding scoring performance of the season, 
ringing in 30 points to lead the game's scorers. Following 
the victory over Catholic 13., Navy was primed for 
West Point. 

Led by George Bouvet's 2 l ) points and \1 Swanson's 
20, Navy took a permanent lead after the ball game was 




Dave Smallev lavs oiu- in 



Arms and tin- Ball 



Andx Dulik on the drive 



eight minutes old. The Blue and Gold couldn't be de- 
nied and a 58% shooting average, despite a variety ot 
Armv defenses, rolled up a 78-67 season-clinching vic- 
tory. 

Statistics tell some of the season's story Frank 
Petinos' 20 point scoring average placed him in the top 
three all-time Navy season scoring bracket; but the 
teamwork of Captain Dave Sm alley, and Andy Dulik 
and top assistance from George Bouvet and Al Swanson 
and the rest of the squad, made the team go. 



112 




First Row: Coach Ray Swartz, Marshall Masterson, Bob Green. Joe Longton, Bob Daughenbaugh, Captain Ed Zabrycki, Larry Marr, Phil 
Brainerd, Jim Zeberlein, Art Wright, Officer Representative Cdr. J.D. Oliver. Second Row: Trainer Billy Fallon, Asst. Coach Al Richards, Sam 
Underhill, Paul Tucker, Bob Johnson, Dick Johnson, Ed Malais, Jim Baker, Dick Oates, Jerry Putnam, Charley Buchanan, Manager Gene 
Moore. Third Row: Walker Uhlhorn, Stu Lustfield, Ivan Wolinsky, Leo Sheehan, Dave Newcomb, Burt Laub, Chuck Larson, Jan Prokop, Dennis 
Wilson, Wes Phenegar, Angelo Inglisa, Carl Larsen. 



Ability, spirit, and depth spelled success lor the '55- 
'56 Navy Wrestling Team. The tough individual compe- 
tition in each weight produced a lineup of grapplers that 
went on to win six of their seven scheduled matches, 
placing four team members in national and eastern post- 
season competition. Standing room attendance at the 
McDonough Hall matches gave positive proof of the 



Captain Ed Zabrycki and Coach Ray Swartz 




popularity of the team; their record gave proof of their 
ability. 

Navy compiled wide-margin victories over Gettys- 
burg, Rutgers, Maryland, West Virginia and Columbia, 
decisively beating Lehigh and losing only to an out- 
standing Penn State team. Against Gettysburg, in the 
opening match of the season, Navy limited the Bullets 
to one decision in notching a 29 to 3 triumph. Rutgers 
proved to be a little tougher, taking two decisions while 
Navy swept the other six weights to post a 22-6 win 
number two. Joe Longton and Phil Brainerd wrestled 
to the tough wins of the match. 

Penn State's balance and ability combined to hold the 
Navy matmen two draws and a lone decision for seven 
points in the only defeat of the winter campaign. Phil 
Brainerd maintained his undefeated record with the 
decision over his opponent, the only other Navy points 



WRESTLING 



113 




Ed Zabrycki vs. Maryland at the- start 




over- 



/'■ Finish 



Applying the pressure 




coming via the two draws; Larry Marrand Fred Thomas 
holding their men to even matches. Penn State 23, 
Navy 7. Bouncing back a week later against Maryland, 
Navy wrestled to victory number three, 24-6, losing 
onlv two decisions. The spirit was running high. On 
successive weekends. Navy defeated West \ irginia, 
33-3. then Columbia in New York, 36-0, to completely 
shutout the Lions. 

In the outstanding match of the campaign. Navy 
closed out the season with a hard-fought 211-13 win over 
Lehigh. A better balanced Navy team made the differ- 
ence. 



114 



HHHH3^ 1 IL4 


H 




DP ..-' 


HV"^B 




■t^H ffi& 


■ 






r^B^ 




^■jgp. * 







Larry Marr goes for an arm 



In the Eastern Intercollegiates, Larry Marr, wrestling 
at 157 lbs., and Captain Ed Zabrycki, at 177, both came 
out as second place finishers in commendable perform- 
ances in their respective weight classes. Competitive 
ability was dominant throughout the team, resulting in 
a highly successful record for the Ray Swartz coached 
Navy wrestlers in 1956. 





Coming up — a pin 



oe Loneton — determination 



115 




,HAV 



f Iff f f • L - 

*kM uv * AVF «avy *avt mi 













R Coach John Higgins, Managci Dick larbuck, Jax Smith, Captain Bob Cecil, < Irpheus Woodbury, Jim Sanders, < Ifficer Repn 
scntative Cdr. Neesc St i R George Lanman, Larrj Cohen, Bob ft n Martin, I mi \nderson, Mike Chappie, Dick Gentz, 

Don Zimmcr, Pat Flood Hill Phcris, Hoi) Duppenthalcr, Mickej ' I'Bcirnc, Orrie Hiett, Curt McGaffin, Bruce Fricderich, Ed 

Bcron Phil \rcuni, Charles Haughey, Marshall Greer, Gene Peltier, Bob Hartman, Carl Russ. 



116 



Finishing the '^ ; -' ; <. season with a creditabli 
record. Navy's Swimming ream capped its schedule by 
establishing new records in several events and by gain- 
ing a fourth consecutive victory over \rtny. 

Opening the season at Cornell, Navj was nosed out 
by tin- Big Rid. 46-38. Mickej O'Beirne's tirsr place in 
diving marked the beginnings ol Ins contributions. 
along with those of Bill Pheris and John McMillan, to 
Navy's prowess on the board throughout the season. 
Against Dartmouth. Navy captured only two first 
places and came out on the small end of the 51-33 score. 

Despite the campaign's dark beginning. Coach John 
Higgin's squad broke into the win column with a re- 
sounding 76-8 triumph over Penn Military and rolled 
up new Academy records in two events. Mike Chappie 
finished the 200 yard individual medley in a new \ata- 
torium record time to bust previous marks along with 
Bob Rogers' betterment of his own time in the 200 yard 
breaststroke. After taking everything in sight against 
PMC. Navy walloped Columbia. 68-16. The 300 yard 
medley relay team of Marshall Greer. Ed Beron and 
Andy Anderson started things rolling by setting a new 



SWIMMING 



Vadenn mark in that event. Duke and V.M.I, became 
victories number three and four in successive meets. 

I he record drifted to 4-3 with a Harvard win over 
tin- Navy tankmen, lour days later however, Navj 
sunk West Chester College prior to a narrow loss to 
Princeton, 43-41. \ defeat by always powerful Yale left 
nothing but victories ahead to conclude the season. 
Greer, lax Smith, and Anderson set the second Naval 

h John Higgins and Captain Bob Cecil 




. 





Jax Smith, butterflies home 



Don Zimmer takes off against Army in the final, 
meet deciding Relay. 



Academy medley relay record of the season against 
Pittsburgh, sparking a 58-26 Navy win. 

First class members of the team could take special 
pride in the fourth straight defeat of Army. For the 
fifth consecutive year, the Army-Navy meet was de- 
cided in the final event and gave Coach Higgins his 
fifth win over West Point in six starts; Navy 46, Army 
38. Before the starting gun of the final event, Navy held 
a slim one point lead in the meet. However, the 400 
yard freestyle relay team of Tim Anderson, Pat Flood, 
Gene Peltier and Don Zimmer kept the lead all the way 
to defeat the Army relaymen and clinch the event and 
meet. 

In post Army competition, Navy dumped Penn, 
56-28, and followed with a season closing win over 
Franklin & Marshall. Navy went all out to prove the 
championship quality of its swimmers by setting new 
Academy records in six different events, to sink F&M 
76-8. Jack Martin established a new national collegiate 
record in the 1500 yard meter freestyle to climax a 
record breaking season. Captained by Bob Cecil, the '56 
swimmers registered a bright season in the record books 
as a successful, spirited Navy team. 



Buck Rogers and Marshall Greer look at the record book. 





Tim Anderson gets set 



John Martin gets the word from Coach Higgins 





ij> A **A % 



/ ■ r Officer Repn I h |.D Hazard, I SN, Boh Smith. Id Hera, Managei Roj Hcjhall, Captain Dave reachout, Bob Craven, 

Ted Taylor, [im Buckncr, Coach Capt. R.D. Whitcscll, USMl Ron Bruce Nolan, Hill Campbell, Dick Vosscllcr, Ollie Baker, 2 c Man- 

ager ["om Drumm, Bob Saracco, Ward Corrcll, Wall P I Polski, Bob Wciland, Wilson Rook, I rnie Merritt, ; c Manager 

Silas Daughcrty, Fred Rosenberg, George McAleer. 



PISTOL 



Captain Dave Teachout and Captain R.D. Whitesell, Coach 




I S. Revolver Association National Intercollegiate Match 
Champions for the fifth consecutive year, the Navy Pistol 1 1 am. 
Outstanding in ability. Navy registered a record breaking '55-'56 
season. The team broke the \cademy record with ;i 1397 and the 
I .S.R. \. national intercollegiate record, firing a 1454. The overall 
record for the season in dual matches was 6-3. with only a loss to 
Army to mar a 5-1 record among collegiate competition. Indi- 
vidually. All-American Dick Vosseller's shooting captured the 
Navy individual record and the Q.S.R.A. national record, posting 
a 297. Top shooting all season came from Vosscllcr, Hob Smith, 
Ollie Baker. Fred Rosenberg and captain Dave Teachout, with top 
assistance from a fine team. 



Dick Vosseller, holder 
of the L'SRA National 
record — 297 . 






THE SEASON 




Navy 5 


Dartmouth 


4 


Navy 8 


M IT 


1 


Navy 3 


Harvard 


6 


Navy 9 


Pennsylvania 





Navy 7 


Princeton 


2 


Navy 9 


Pittsburgh 





Navy 9 


Adelphi 





Navy 8 


Williams 


1 


Navy 9 


Princeton 





Navy 8 


Yale 


1 


Navy 5 


Army 


4 




Kneeling: Officer Representative Capt. B.J. Harral, Coacli Art Potter, Manager Nat Devoll. 
Standing: John Griffiths, Tom Lynch, Dick Hanson, Don Clark, Jim Hogg, Mike Gluse, Ken 
Meneke, Dwight Avis, Jack Collins, John Clearwater. 



SQUASH 




Hard work and constant improvement under Coach 
Art Potter paid off in 'S5-'S6 laurels for the Navy 
Squash team, second place finishers among the nation's 
outstanding teams. After an early season loss to Har- 
vard, Navy rolled up eight straight wins including a 
schedule ending victory over Army. Dartmouth, M.I.T., 
Penn, Princeton, Pitt, Adelphi, Williams, and Yale fell 
.to the racquets of the Navy squad captained by Tom 
Lynch. Paced by All-Americans Art Clark and unde- 
feated John Griffiths, the story of Navy's success can be 
attributed to the steady improvement and well balanced 
ability of the Navy ladder. The season climaxed with 
the Army win and the four man national playoffs. John 
Clearwater, Clark, Griffiths, and Lynch took second 
place for Navy in the completion of one of the Naval 
Academy's finest Squash seasons. 



Coach Art Potter and captain Tom Lynch 



121 



GYMNASTICS 




Coach Chet Phillip. 1 : and Captain Sir;;- Arnold 



\ remarkable combination of depth, ability and pre- 
cision made the '5S-'S6 Gymnastics m .imih ;i successful 
one. Teamwork and stamina were consistent traits pos- 
sessed by each of the individual competitors on the 
squad. The season was in its final stages before a loss to 
Penn State broke an unbeaten string of five victories. 
A loss ro \rmv in rlu- schedule ending meet ended rhe 
season with a record of five wins and two defeats. 

In rlu- Eastern Intercollegiates, following the regular 
season. Navy's top performers competed for individual 
honors. Herb Doby tied for second in the rope climb 
with his best time of tin- year. Wayne Wills, also took .1 
second place medal, tailing short of first place on the 
parallel hars by jusr two points. Fred Hoerner's out- 
standing ability on the riving rings won him both the 



Eastern and later, the National Championship, 

During the regular season. Navy opined up by easily 
outperforming their first two opponents, North Caro- 
lina and Temple. Pittsburgh was the first team to offer 
any strong competition, although rlu- Navy gvmnasts 
were rlu- dominant performers throughout rlie match. 
Against West \ irginia, Navy rolled up rhe highest nam 
score of the season in a 75] _<-2n'._. victory. With team 
depth, especially on rhe flying rings, making the differ- 
ence, Navj nosed our Syracuse in a thriller a week later. 
1' nil I loci mi w as t In- top man on the rings with a 271 , 
for his top scoring performance of rlu season. Mike 
Elinski's 240 took second place ill rhe deciding evenl 
of rhe nicer. 1 hen came the succeeding losses to Penn 
State and Army. 



First Row: Chuck (Cnettlcs, Reb Woottcn, Wayne Wills. Mike Elinski, Steve Arnold, Captain, Larry White, Fred Hoi rner, Pal I ord, [*om Nor- 
cham. Set id H ... Ken McNutt, Hill Swenson, Hill Kronzer, Chuck Korzinck, Ray Viera, Bob Bov R 1 eonard, Officer Representative 
Cdr. W.C. Blattmann. Third A! :: Chuck Charncco, Manager, Coach Chcl Phillips, I erry Cooper, I erry Emery, Ra tzcr, lack Bortz, Herb 

Doby, Pete Midgarden, \sst. Coach John Rammacher. 



tj e i @ @ e,$ f i 




Captain Steve Arnold makes it look easy 



Despite a good performance by Navy, Army out- 
scored the Blue and Gold, 55-41. However, several indi- 
viduals came through with fine performances. Captain 
Steve Arnold took a first place on the side horse as he 
had been doing throughout the season; Hoerner, also a 
consistent winner, took the rings competition. Seconds 
were scored with Chuck Knettles' routine on the hori- 
zontal bar and Herb Doby's 3.8 second climbing time in 
the rope climb. 

Coach Chet Phillips' able tutoring produced cham- 
pions ami a fine team. Behind Arnold, Knettles, Doby, 
Wills, and Hoerner, stood teammates, Pat Ford, Tom 
Northam, Larry White, and Mike Elinski; all part of 
the successful team effort in 1956. 




The incomparable Fred Hoerner — 
National Flying Rings Champion. 



Herb Doby — speed and power 




Chuck Knettles — Round and 
round he goes. 




Wayne Wills — concentration and will to win 




123 




Officer Representative Cdr. Price, John Kirkpatrick, Jim Wolverton, Captain Rudy Duns. Raj Hill. Frank 
Zechlin, Coach Joseph Fiems. St . K Manager Jim Shortridge, Larry I'olk. Charles Eidson, Dick Davies, Paul Stiller, 
George Robillard, Jim Woods, Jim Estep, Vssi Coach Andre Deladrier. 



FENCING 



EASTERN INTERCOLLEGIATE CHAMIMONS 




I 



Coach Joseph Fiems produced another outstanding 
Naval Academy Fencing team during th< :: -'-' season 
to add to Navy's continually excellent record over the 
years. Despite three losses in a 5-3, won-lost season, the 
fencers closed the campaign in blazing style, captunng 
both team and individual trophies in tournament com- 
petition. Captained by Rudy Dans. Navy won the 
Eastern Intercollegiates and the three weapon trophy 
before going on to third place in the National Inter- 
collegiates. Individually, Jim Wolverton fenced to 
fourth in sabre competition in both tournaments, Ray 
Hill took fourth in the NCAA's foil competition, and 
John Kirkpatrick placed second in the NCAA's epee 
matches. Teamwork and ability added a tine finish to a 
successful season. 



Coach Joseph Fiems and Captain Rudy Dans. 




124 




BASEBALL 



Captain Larry Magner and Coach 
Max Bishop 

A hefty swing 

Good baseball was the trademark of the '56 Navy Base- 
ball Team in a season that saw outstanding Navy batting 
pace the team to a successful winning campaign. Through- 
out the season, Navy maintained at least three hitters 
among the Eastern Intercollegiate League's leading batters. 
The season's result showed a 13-7-1 record to proclaim a 
big Baseball season for Navy in 1956. 

Opening in blazing style against Trinity, the Max Bishop 
coached Navy nine exploded for an 8-run, 4th inning to 
notch an 11-4 win. Youngster Ben Montoya got his start 
on a winning record gaining credit for the relief pitching 
win. In game No. 2, darkness stopped a tight Navy-Lafay- 
ette game and left the score at 5-5 in the 8th inning. A big 

First Rozv: Coach Max Bishop, Andy Massamino, Joe Neary, Larry Magner, Don Norkin, Ben Montoya. Second Rozv: Jim Marshall, John Bartocci, 
Neil Bates, Dick Toner, Dick Snyder, Ebbie Eaton. Third Rozv: Pat Harrington, Peter Hoefstedt, Ed Stewart, Dale McClure, Manager Gene 
Sullivan. Fourth Rozv: Officer Representative Captain Baker, Dave Smalley, George Welsh, Dick Guest, Howard Heiden, Les McMenamin, Dick 
Smith. 







» 


_, f „ jtthb, f— 




VI / RUCV f I' J 










9th frame wiped our ;i Syracuse lead and gave Navy an 
8-7 victory with Jim Marshall's pinch hit double bringing 
across the winning run. Muhlenberg and Bucknell were 
registered as Navy wins before the unbeaten stung was 
snapped by Princeton, 4-7, despite Navy's 13 hit attack. 

Bouncing hack to the winning column, the Navy nine 
rolled up three wins in a row. I he first came with Mon- 



toya's third pitching victor) of the season against Wm. & 
Mary. \ triple steal in the H'th gave Navy a thrilling 6-5 
on the road decision at Columbia. Against Maryland, Ben 
Montoya's 4 hit pitching combined with Navy extra hase 
hits, gave Navy a 7-1 triumph. Loss No. 2 came against 
the strong pitching of Fordham, two days later. 

Dave Smallej and Dick Snyder combined in slugging 



First base action 







126 





Trapped between third and home 



power in a Navy 12 hit performance to defeat Brown, 16-3, 
on the road before a following day Yale victory over the 
midshipmen evened the road trip record. Gettysburg ad- 
ministered a 9-6 defeat to Navy despite Snyder's 3-for-S 
afternoon in a game that went 14 innings before the end. 
Two days later, Navy downed Penn, 6-2; captain Larry 
Magner driving across 3 runs with a double and a triple. 
In a rain shortened slugfest that saw 17 Navy hits, the 
Navy ball team swamped Temple, 18-1. Duane Greenhoe 
gained pitching credit for the win. Andy Massimino had a 
big day at the plate, notching 5 hits for S trips. Then came 
two consecutive losses to Cornell and Penn State before a 
slugging 13 hit victory over Villanova, 11-10. Dave 
Smalley's batting prowess again proved invaluable, as he 
clouted two home runs and two singles. Joe Neary's squeeze 
bunt in the 9th, scored Massimino from third to cop the 



ball game. Pete Hofstedt's relief performance gave him 
pitching honors. A 9-2 win over Pittsburgh preceded the 
1956 Army-Navy Baseball game on the Lawrence Field 
diamond. 

Four hits and two walks combined to give Navy a four 
run 1st inning and a start on a 7-4 winning margin over 
Army. Able to muster only two hits off Navy hurlers, Ben 
Montoya and Dick Smith, Army fell behind at the start 
and never could equalize the Navy 10 hit batting power, 
paced by Neary's, Magner's and Tom Eaton's two hit 
afternoon. It was a fitting end to a fine season — a season 
that not only saw a fine team record, but some outstanding 
individual play; the batting of .448 hitter Dave Smalley 
and the plus .300 hitting of Larry Magner and Dick 
Snyder; and the 7-2 pitching record of Ben Montoya — a 
season of winning baseball. 



Pete Hofstedt pitches against Villanova 



-<• 



1 i. 



M " •* «»» ut» «"» * r "» urr uVr ,.„ nn 






•. Cdr. M. I. Stewart, Coach Jim Gherdes, Coach Earl I liomson. Doc Dougherty, rony \ntony, Ken Peterson, Joe Harrison, Bill 
Cox, Tom Dioriene, Don Johnson, Mark O'Hara, Pete Purvis, Link Mossop, Wall Meukow. & and Roto: Larry Gerhart, ken Harrison, Hill 
Coture, George Cudahay, red Pickel, Dixie Howell, Inn Vnderson, Charles Noll, Bill Smith, Larry Kaufman, Hill Udcnderfer, Vince Roper, 
Torn Powell, John Biggers, George l'liillips. '/'■ . K Scent Ruby, Pete Peterson, Jim Bible, Tom Wood, Hnl> Weibly, I '<>m Jacobs, Randy 
league, John McLaughlin, Don User, Wayne Morris, Chris Stephano, \\ es Hewitt, Fred Lippert, Larry Ingles. Fourth Row: John McMichael, Jim 
Ncwcomh, Tom McConnell, Dan .\U-vrrs, Percy Beard, Ernie l'> le, Pete Corr, Clark Rook, Jim Cole, \ndy London, Not Pictured: Dave Mi Intyre 



With the "toughest schedule ;i Navy track team has 
tackled," the Earl Thomson coached Navy trackmen em- 
barked on r Ik- 1956 brack Season, \ltcr the outstanding 
individual performances of broad jumping Joe Harrison, 
shot putter Andy Long ton, miler \\ :ilt Meukow and pole 
vaulting Dave Mclntyre during rlu- winter indoor season, 
a successful spring season was looked for from rlu- '56 squad. 

Opening against Duke- ar Durham, North Carolina, in 
what was called rlu- closest meet run at Duke in years, the 
Blue Devils edged out Navy, 07-04. Split down the middle. 
Duke's S first places just bettered Navy's 7. \\ alt Meukow 
grabbed two first places with wins oxer the field in the 880 
and mile runs to rank as the top Navy scorer of the after- 
noon. Don \lser began his winning efforts with a winning 
toss in the Javelin and combined in the pointmaking de- 
partment with Longton's and Mclntyre's firsts in their 
events — but the team total fell just short of an opening 
meet victory. 

The following Saturday, Navy opened the Thompson 
Stadium season against Perm State and Georgetown, plac- 
ing second in the triangular meet behind the Penn State 
team. Dave Mclntyre's second win of the season in the 
pole vault paced the Navy scorers but put a damper on his 
season's activities as he suffered an ankle injury going for 
a track record of 14-2. Two other firsts and several seconds 
totaled up to 64 points to place between Penn State's 74 
and Georgetown's 24. Meet No. 3, run at Maryland, proved 
to be a tough one tor Navy as the tracksters dropped the 
dual contest despite wins in 4 of the 6 field events. 

The first win of the season was clocked on the home 
track as Navy decisively beat previously undefeated Pitt. 
"5 1 _. to 553 _>. ruling the field events and the distance runs. 
V\ alt Meukow- came through with two firsts in the mile and 



TRACK 



two mile; Mark O'Hara ran the 880 yard run in winning 
time. In the team's best department, Dixie Howell and 
Hill Smith pole vaulted to first and second places and com- 
bined with Navy firsts and seconds in the broad jump, shot 
put, and javelin to build up the winning total and dump 
Pitt from among the East's undefeated track teams. 

Three Navy firsts gave Navy prominent standing in the 
Heptagonal Games a week later. Andy Longton established 
a new Naval Academy Shot Put record with his 52'7" heave 
to take winning honors in that event. Wayne Morris and 




Coach Earl Thompson and Captain Joe Harrison 



128 




Joe Harrison goes for distance 



Joe Harrison also became 1956 Heptagonal Champions in 
their respective events — the javelin and broad jump. The 
season clincher was scheduled next in Thompson Stadium 
against West Point. 

Navy's low hurdles team broke open a tight meet grab- 
bing off the meet clinching points to defeat Army, 71^- 
59} 2 and top off a fine season. Three double winners paced 
the squad in point producing efforts — Walt Meukow, with 
a dual win in the mile and the 880; captain Joe Harrison 
with firsts in the broad jump and 100 yd. dash; and Tim 
Anderson scoring firsts in both hurdles events. Andy 
Longton also registered a first in the shot put to couple 
with Wayne Morris as the other Navy first place winners. 
The hurdles team swept their event for nine points to assure 
a Navy victory and an Army defeat to write a glorious 
finish to the 1956 Navy track season. 



:• 




Record-breaking Andy Longton pushes out a long one 



Navy gets off to a good start against Army 





Clearing thi- bar at 13'6" 




I I II 



I llll llll * - |f.f| -, 

1 1 ib 1 1 ii r, m mM 







t - -= 



/ 



Sometimes things look bad 



130 




. . but they always get belter 










4 - 1, 



I 




Coach H. Y. Davidson, John Webster, Eynar Christensen, Darrow Kirkpatrick, Barry Howard, Al Williams,' Terry [Priebe, Lee Walker, Jack 
Cook, Manager Ben George. Kneeling: Coxswain Paul Coon. 




Coach Hubbell Davidson and 
Captain John Webster 



Navy Lightweight Crew came into its own in 1956, officially being estab- 
lished as a sport at the academy. Behind the coaching of LCdr. Hubbell 
Davidson, the ISO's rowed to a commendable season over the racing courses 
ot the East. Opening against Cornell and Princeton, both the J.V. and Var- 
sity shells trailed to place third but rebounded a week later with dual wins 
over Penn. The J.V.'s won their race by a two and a half length finish prior 
to the Varsity's length and a half win over Penn behind the stroke of 
captain John Webster. 

In the E.A.R.C. Regatta, the Navy J.V. shell beat Princeton and Col- 
umbia in the morning eliminations to qualify for the afternoon champion- 
ship race. They went on to capture third place to rank as the third best 
lightweight J.V. crew in the East. Despite an excellent time over the dis- 
tance, the Varsity shell failed to qualify for the final varsity race. The 
future looks bright for a fast developing lightweight crew in the years to 
follow. 



1501B.CREW 



131 




J 



,fll 



If if ■ *Kji i! ilf >' ■ 



iff iW 



3" KB 



VARS] IV CREW: Maury Browne, Charlie Coker, Bob Mulholland, John 
Forbrick, Audie Audilet, George Hennig, Dennis Sloan, Willie Rii 
swain Charles Wilbur. 



fV CREW: |ohn Nulty, Martin McCullough, David Meyer, Craig Barnurn, 

I, ,i,l, l.i.lm K.iili. Kenneth Brown, William Stiles, Coxswain 
Bob \' \ in. 



The crews of Conch Rusty Callow have always been fine 
crews and the 1956 Navy crew was no exception. Holding 
their own in a year of outstanding crews. Navy rowed on 
to the l.R.A. Regatta with high hopes of placing among 
the winning crews. 

Midweek time trials caused a shakeup among the boat- 
ings prior to the season's opener against Princeton and as 
a result the ex-Xo. 2 shell stroked by John Nulty. moved 
up to varsity status for the race over the Severn River 
course. Both crews got off to early leads in the respective 
varsitv and J.V. races, but both placed behind the winning 
Princeton crew. The Plebes, however, came through with 
their opening win of the campaign. 

Regaining their balance, the original varsity boat, 
stroked by Maury Browne, moved up to No. 1 spot to row 
against Cornell and Syracuse. The day's results showed 
Navy second in the varsity race behind Cornell; the ].\ .'s 



Captain If'illis Rich and 
I ich Rust Callow 



CREW 




132 




Getting the -many necessary practice miles 



also a close second to Cornell, after a neck-to-neck race 
right to the finish. The plebes stood out in a 2 length win 
over 2nd place Syracuse in the freshman race. 

Back on the Severn for the Adams Cup Regatta, the 
Navy crews took two out of the three races for the after- 
noon. The Plebes remained undefeated and the Navy J.V.'s 
rowed home ahead of Penn and Harvard. However, in the 
varsity event, Harvard slipped through at the finish to 
edge out the Navy shell by two seconds. 

One week later at the Eastern Sprint Regatta in Wash- 
ington, after qualifying in the preliminary morning races, 



Navy dropped to sixth in the Varsity Race finals. In the 
J.V. event, Navy finished a fast third behind Cornell and 
Penn. The Navy plebes marked themselves as champions, 
as they came through to cop the very close Freshman Race. 
With the final dual rowing race of the season against 
Wisconsin the Varsity oarsmen of Captain Will Rich closed 
out the schedule prior to the I.R.A. championships in June. 
A fast finishing Wisconsin crew pulled over the finish line 
just ahead of the Navy Varsity that had led most of the 
way. It was a tough season for a fine Navy crew, in a 
season of fine college crews. 



Starboard side at work 




LACROSSE 





Captain Matt Burt and Coach Dint) 



Navy attack John Carter, Doc Dugan, and Shannon 
Heyward 

Since rlu- middle ol tin- '^5 scisun. \;iv\ Lacrosse teams 
had dropped onlj one game in 23. with one national cham- 
pionship to their credit over the span. Despite a rough 
schedule of seven Class A and three Class H opponents 
among the Eastern Lacrosse Division reams. Navy com- 
piled another winning record in '56. 

With the weather causing a slow start m practice ses- 
sions, Navj stepped orf the season against Washington 
College, coining out with an opening game, 1S-10, win. 
Shannon Heyward led the scorers with lour goals. Victory 
Mo. 2 was registered nun- days later as Syracuse bowed to 
some potent Navj scoring. 20-6. I he defense was just as 
strong limiting Syracuse to only 12 attempts at the Navy 
goal while the mid offense was firing *•') shots at the Syra- 
cuse net. Harvard came next on the Navy schedule. Des- 
pite mud and rain, the Navj offense powered through IS 
goals td Harvard's two to defeat the Crimson for the 18th 
consecutive time. Twelve Navj squadmen complemented 
the scoring ranks youngstei John Carter leading the pack 
from his attack 'position, throwing in 3 scores past the 
I lar\ a rd goalie. 

Penn State was the opposition m the setting that pro- 
vided Navy with its fourth straight win, 17-4. Heyward 
opened up the scoring seven seconds alter the initial face- 
off to open up the State College goal. Win No. 5 came with 
a final quarter, J goal, scoring effort to best a tough Vir- 
ginia team. 8-5. John Carter's steal and goal, with the 

Cavalier goalie out of the crease, made the game all even 



R ■: lorn Giambatista, Cliff Eley, Larry Goldstein, John Robinson, Jim Wood, Jerry Johnston, Ken Dickcrson, Man Hun, Charlie Curtis, 
Jim Blanchard, \l Reed, Jim Owen, Brent Taylor, Ron Beagle. Coach Dinty Moore, Ted White. Sam Bass. Boh McElwec, Joe 

Mayhew, George McNulty, Buzzy Beans. Gene McKenzie, Pete Gatje, lom Burns. Doc Duiian. Johnny Worrell, fill Livingstone, Fitz Warren, 
George Kohlkoa< Boh Luke. John Carter. Ed Britton, Shannon Heyward. J.B. Williams. Mike Chappie. Wayne McKec, Lee Gies, 

\l Barbero, George Clark. Boh ( I'Keefc, Bill Brown. Mike Giambatista, Dick V'osscllcr, M Wattay. 





Jerry Johnston goes after the score 



Cliff Eley's goal play made the opponents work extra 
hard for their goals 




Action against Maryland 




135 




'Don't try to scare me' 



at 5-5 at the beginning of the 4th period. Thereafter, Vir- 
ginia was held scoreless while the Navj offense combined 
to total the winning margin. The game, then considered 
to he the go for the national championship, came up next. 
Unbeaten Maryland and unbeaten Navy clashed at 
College Park before the top seasonal croud of 1H,IKH) in- 
cluding 1HX) imported midshipmen. A fundamentally bet- 
ter and more balanced Maryland nam upset Navy's bid 
for the important win drilling in 10 scores to Navy's five. 
Individually, Cliff Kiev was the Navy standout as his d( 
fensive work in the goal came in for outstanding praise. It 
was a tough loss. The team bounced back in the- win 
column with a resounding 23-4 defeat of Duke at Durham 



Look out, goalie 




the following week-end. Larry Goldstein drilled in five 
goals with Shannon Heyward registering seven assists to 
dominate the offensive activity. Heyward again led Navy 
a week later, as he scored four times in a losing cause. Johns 
Hopkins squeezed out an 8-6 victory in a game that wasn't 
decided until the final minutes of play. I he season record 
drifted to 6-2. 

Princeton became- Navy win No. 7 in a fired up team 
victory. CI iff Eley, playing lor three- quarters of the game, 
shut out the- I igers for the three quarters, while teammates 
|im Blanchard and Shannon Heyward were pacing the 
Navy offense to a 14-4 victory. Everything was set for the 
annual clash with Army. 

\ tough Caelcr defense sralleel the Navy offense and 
figured in the Lacrosse upset of the- season, stopping Mavy 
3-5. Despite tin- odds-on-Navy, the old upset tradition of 
the- \rmy-\avv rivalry provided another surprising defeat 
in the series. 

Statistically, the 7-3 won-lost record for the campaign 
saw John Carter lead the Navy scoring with the defensive 
work of Captain Matt Burt's defensive crew and goalie 
Cliff Kiev's ability limiting the opponents to less than half 
of Navy's total goals. Individual honor went to Midfielder 
Ron Beagle, awarded the Miller Memorial Cup. 



McKenzie out w get 
ir 1 



Maryland 



136 





GOLF 



Teeing off against Army 



The Navy Golf Team came through the '56 season with 
a good record. Plagued by bad weather, the first two 
matches were played and won in the rain. Coach Bob 
Williams' golfers registered opening victories over Dart- 
mouth and Bucknell before the season record went to 2-1 
with the first loss to Penn State. Following a loss to 
Princeton and Georgetown in a three team match, Navy 
outputted Pittsburgh, with five men shooting 75 or better. 
Avenging the earlier loss, Navy beat Georgetown in a dual 
match, 4-3, with team Captain Frank Kelso winning his 
match and the team match on the 19th hole. At Duke, the 
Navy squad lost a close 13-14 contest before getting back 
on the winning trail with a 6-1 victory over Maryland. 
Then came the trip to the Eastern Championships. Indi- 
vidually, Cookie King was the Navy standout, qualifying 



Captain Frank Kelso and 
Coach Bob Williams 







for the individual play-ofFs for the second consecutive year. 
The Navy squad finished a commendable 5th in a field of 
16 colleges. 

With two matches going to 19 holes and Navy wins, the 
pre-Army part of the season closed with a 4-3 Navy victory 
over Pennsylvania. Facing Army over the Naval Academy 
course, the annual duel turned out to be one of the season's 
closest matches. An Army victory in the final individual 
match that was extended to 19 holes, gave West Point a 
4-3 victory in spite of some fine golf from the Navy squad. 



First Row: Bill Hodge, Dave Wright, Frank Kelso, John Davis. Second Row: Coach Bob Williams, Tom Rosser, Carleton King, Manager Frank 
White, Mike O'Brien, Officer Representative Cdr. D.L.G. King. 




IH nas %t %'• 



/ 



TENNIS 



Posting one of the better Navy Tennis records of recent 
years, the 1956 Navy team had an impressive season — ■ 
losing onlv 2 matches while winning 11 others. Five return- 
ing lettermen gave coach Art Hendrix a nucleus tor a good 
squad — and the excellent record showed the results. 

Rained out of the first two scheduled matches, Navy 
belatedlj opened the '56 season beating Penn State 9-0, 
with Tom Lynch holding down the No. 1 singles slot. 
Princeton administered the first of the two defeats three 
days later, with just Don Clark taking points lor Navy. 
\n easy 8-1 victory over Maryland saw only the final 
doubles match extended to three sets, lengthening the 
Navy-Terps series more to Navy's favor, 19-1. s -l a ml 9-0 
victories over Columbia ami Georgetown preceded .c road 




I '</i7i Art Hendrix and Captain Red Lewis 

tup's 7-2 loss to Yale. From this point on, the season was 
all Navy. \ week later at Cornell, Navj beat the Big Red, 
6-3, following with a 7-2 win over Swarthmore back on the 
academy courts. Sweeping past Bucknell, 9-0, Navy con- 



\«'i Coach Robert Bender, Officci Rc| I li I' 1 Deanc, I «m Vshwoith, I'iguc Tobin, Reed Lewis, John Magana, lorn 

Lynch, Coach Art Hendrix Jim Baker, Keith I eatherson, Vic Vicwcg, Hill Goggins, Bob Hanvcy, Graham llndcrhill, A I (link, Fred 

Fredcricci. '!"■ 'V •>: Walt Reister, Tom Luke, George Watts, John Howe, Jim Adkins, Stamps I toward, Dick I lanson, John Griffiths. 




w 






' .-•■' 



r*»- 









Tom Lynch and Reed Lewis team up in a doubles match 



tinued on the winning trail, losing only a doubles match 
while besting Wm. & Mary, 8-1, and then Temple by the 
same score. The team rolled to a 9-0 shutout over Penn 
before the Reed Lewis captained Navy squad journeyed 
to West Point to face Army. 

The Army courts proved to be no detriment to the 
ability of the Navy squad — sweeping the doubles play and 



losing only one singles match, Navy set a new Army-Navy 
competition record and highlighted the Spring A-N com- 
petition with a 8-1 win over the Cadets. For the seventh 
consecutive year, Navy beat Army in tennis to qualify as 
the most successful consecutive winner in the sports rivalry 
between the academies. It was a great season for Navy 
Tennis in '56. 



Dick Hanson goes for the hall as John Griffiths watches 






FirstR ["om Lucke, Harold Haddock, Oi Man Friedland, Bob Slavcn, Dave Minton. St nd Roa Dick Eminent, Sam 

Bailey, Richard Russell, Jack Feeney, Keith DeMott, Dick lilhii.ni. Charles Mastcrson, Ronald Wright. Third k ■ George Lehmberg, Robert 
\Wlls. John Sapp, Frank Franklin. Janus Kin-. Charles Biele, Edward \ndcrson, Richard Trippe* Emesi Anderson, Roy Clason, Dick Beam, 
John W alter, Brooks Ba\ s. Managei Nai Barker. / I una. I Morency, Ronald Render, \rthui Bass. Dave Ulard, Don Brown, Raymond 

Connollv, Mike \shei. wade Sisson, Greg Nolan, Marion Doss, George lenkins, Frank llerrin. Krcd Troutman, l.t. C.G. Robertson I 
l.t. (jg R. H. Milerbach Plebe Coach . 



The 1956 Dinghy Sailing Team mack- the '56 season the- most successful 
Navy sailing season on record. Led all the way by the hnllanr skippering 
and team leadership of Captain Dave- Minton, supported by a host of letter- 
winners including George Weigold, Jim Googe, Dick Tillman and Tom 
Lucke, the sailors swept over a total of 61 schools in nine regattas, finishing 
second only once. 

Navy's first big test of the year was the Danmark Trophy Regatta, held 
in Boston. The midshipmen won in a stretch drive after trailing defending 
national champs. M.I.T., by 16 points with two races remaining in the 
series. Successive victories in the War Memorial Trophy Regatta, the 
Spring Invitational, and the Middle Atlantic Championships, all of which 
Navy won handily, proved the depth and ability of the squad. The I ! 
Trophy, symbolic of Eastern sailing supremacy, was the only award that 
eluded the sailors. Brown University, who had previously lost twice to 
Navy by wide margins, eeked out a four point victory with Navy a very 
close second in the 11 school held. 

The ability of the '56 team established them as a top contender for the 
National Championship. 

DINGHY SAILING 



National 

Intercollegiate 

Champs 



The race is on 




Coach Robertson and Captain Dave 
Minton 






L 



14d 





Getting the boats ready 




BRIGADE STAFF 

Left to right: Dickerson, Tarbuck, Kelso, Michaels, Butts, 
Hobbs, Blanchard, Jernee, Collier. 



S T R I P E R S 



SPRING SET 



FIRST REGIMENTAL STAFF 

Left to ri'ht: Stocham, Swanson, Fulk, Covey, Price, 
Simpson, Ball. 





Left to right: Zechlin, Shumaker, Honsinger, Jaeger, Van Metre, Sullivan. 



FIRST BATTALION 




1ST CO.— Left to right: Groner, Alexander, Welsh, Hunr. Maic 




3RD CO. — Lett to right: Ernst, Lakev. Furlong, Lind, Tucker 



142 





6TH CO. — Lett to right: Armstrong, Rosenhauer, Allen, Harris, Evans. 



TH CO. — Left to right: Sasso, Hanson, Roberts, Heisinger, Smile\ r . 



8TH CO. — Left to right: Elinski, Johnson, Bird, Byng, Carre. 





SECOND BATTALION 




Left to r!j/i(:~Charneco, Audilet, Chavarria, Harmon, Flood, Schmidt. 






'1H CO. — Left in right: Ford, Green, Gulick, Herndon, Scanlon. 



10TH CO. — Lett to right: Motlieruay, Baricev, Nelson, liennatt, William! 



11TH CO. — Left to right: Hoerncr, Miller, Cecil, Sloan. Westrerhausen. 



12TH CO.— Left to right: Neuhard, Hart, Burt, Good, Baker. 




THIRD BATTALION 



Left; \ Igar, Nicholson, Weeks, Simpson, Lindquist, Sibley. 





144 





Left to right: Johnston, Nelson, Rich, Sackett, Oaks, Huddle 



FOURTH BATTALION 



I H CO. — Left to right: Slough, Fischer, Davidson, Tovvnsend, Peterson. 




14TH CO. — Left to right: Wright, Putnam, Macon, Scheyder, Cyr. 



151 H CO. — Left to right: McGarry, Anion, Lynch, Phillips, Harrison 



16TH CO.— Left to right: Chester, Dans, Jacobson, Roper, Poe. 




145 




Left to right: Koerkenmcicr. Langenheim, Wills. Cusick, Kosu-sky. McLaughlin. 




FIFTH BATTALION 





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17 TH CO. — /.<•///» n'jj/i/.- Ogram, Hogg. Johnston, Hull. Knettles. 



L8TH CO.— Left to right: Mann. Lylcr. Lloyd, Schmitt, Piske. 



1<>TH CO.— Lett to right: McHugh, Wilson, Baggs. Pickel. Watkins. 



20TH CO.— Left to rich: Boensch. Alser, Egan, Buckclcw. Buckk-v 




146 




21ST CO.— Left to right: O'Connell. Landis,' Mayfield, Peterson, Ranson 




22XD CO. — Left to right: Smallman, Olson, Bossert, Booth, Williar 



23RD CO.— Left to right: Kelly, Howell, Sliafer, Benson, Higgins 



24TH CO. — Left to right: Bauman, Owings, Smith, Scott, LaMotte. 




SIXTH BATTALION 



a 






Left to right: Miller, Evans, Granger, Davis, Franklin, Groepler. 



I 





Color Guard. Ltjt to right: Jenson, 
Tarbuck. Butts. Bair. 



MO Ma> ** V £RS! 





Sramo, Luce Hall Room A, and No Mo' Rivers 




Everybody enjoys the act as two famous members of the 
Executive Department are aptly portrayed. 



\s we left Luce Hall after the Seamo exam that Tuesdaj 
morning of May 22. 1956, ir was hard to believe that there 
were truly "no more rivers." Twice a year for four years we 
had gone through the rigorous exam week schedule faithfully 

"paying the rem" for another semester, despite the fact thai 
it sometimes took a second attempt in tin form of the re- 
exam. However, now it was over, the rivers behind us ami 
our future ahead. 

Pre-June Week proceedings commenced with the No Mo' 
Rivers ceremony depicting the events and the people that 
had made our stay at the Academy memorable. Poking fun 
at the members of the Executive Department and tin in- 
structors in the Academic Departments headlined the pro- 
duction. 

The few days between the end of exams and the arrival of 
parents and O.A.O.'s passed quicklv and then |une Week 
1956! 



Recollections of a hot day in May 



Cdr. Kinney's double tells of his 
exploits 



HO 





Proud parents arrive to be carried along by the rush 
of June Week 1956. 




As zee entered 



and as we left Mother Nature provided the tears for Sob Sunday 








'fit,- Superintendent's ' , ''"fiH'"''y K 1 '"'-' parents a chance 
to meet some of the otjieer^whO-Jnnl guided us for the past 



The liberty hour rush heads for 
town 



> 



■A— 



Drag sailing on a sunny afternoon 



152 





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JftiSlr :-■' ""*■ _ 


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Tii^w 


Jfifci 


■ 












li^dk 






^^^^^^ 




Budding officers dock a YP after demonstrat- 
ing their knowledge of modern seamanship 



For once, we enjoy coming on Farragut Field 



The Eleventh Company with Bob Cecil at the helm captured the colors for 1956 




'Of 



*•: 











GRADUATING WITH DISTINCTION. IN ORDER OF MERIT- Richard William Shafer, Charles Joseph DiBona, 
David Bennett Lloyd. Nicholas James DeNunzio, James Marlin Tavlor, Robert Rensselaer Smiley, III, Lyle Milton Ishol, 
Robert Harper Shumaker, Robert Edward Park. Vernon Chapin Honsinger. John Daniel Kelly, Gene Lowry Woodruff, 
Lawrence Arthur Lowden, Robert Ashton Schade, Jr., Douglass Frederick Hayman, Jr., Robert Henry Harris, John 
Richard Seesholtz. Fermor Worthington Hobbs. Ill, Robert Salisbury Cecil, Paul Hart Bradtmiller, Ralph Gordon Bird, 
Carl Bramlett Wootten, Jr.. George Thomas Kortes Simpson, Richard David Roberts, Forrest Roger Williams. Dean 
Reynolds Sackett. Jr.. David Weggeland. Darrell Eugene Jones. Harlan David Swanson, Jr., James Patterson Ransom, II, 
Donald Joseph Alser, Rex Fulton McAlister, Jr., Edward John Covey. Scott Albert Chester, John Joseph Macan, Donald 
Eugene Lindquist, Andreus August Piske, Jr., Richard Paul Tucker, Dundas Ingoldsby Flaherty, Vicente Jesue Bril- 
lantes, Timothy Joseph Cronin, Jr.. Russell Howard Weidman, George Bishop Gollehon, Richard Edward Smith, Malcom 
John Macdonald, Richard Hawks Warren, Duane Ubbe Beving, James Arthur White, Melvin Bernard Schweiger, Fred 



154 




"ft"" 



f ^' 



^r 



>Tr. 



zM 



*S0r 



m 



MNL 



*: 



Mr £, 



" -^fe 







George Spellman, John Michael Miller, Jr., Gerald Edward Green, Kyran Michael O'Dwyer, Stephen Emerson Sargent, 
Roy Charles Hejhall, Gerald Albert Fulk, George Frederic Schilling, Fred Henry Ernst, William Peter Dunsavage, Charles 
Nicolas Chavarria, Theodore Edwin Lewin, Nicholas Brown, Frank Benton Kelso, II, John Clifford Schoep, Paul Joseph 
Davidson, Leo Warren Stockham, John DuBell Apple, Jr., Armand David Maio, LaVon Henry Bair, Robert Louis Wil- 
liams, John Clarence Putnam, Darwin Dee Lundberg, Edwin Kirby Wharton, Duane Cameron Eggert, Stephen Michail 
Pattin, Robert Eugene Diedrich, Robert William Schmitt, Don Edward Aitchison, Jesse Walter Buckelew, Frederick 
George Adams, James Edward Whelan, Hugh Elliott Hanna, Jr., Spence McFall Armstrong, Edward Joseph Parent, 
Eugene John DeNezza, Mattison Andrew Burt, Jr., Arthur Edwin Keegan, Robert Allen Bachman, Chauncey Frazier 
Hoffman, Douglass John Ohmen, Edgar Wayne Weeks, Jr., William Howard Miller, Ernest John Scheyder, Donald Roben 
Stone, James Kelly Olson, Donald Hendrie Johnston, Jr., Charles Walter Missler, James Mansfield Clark. 



15S 




I .in after sauntering our to our last formation 
in b-robes and other make-shift uniforms it was 
hard to believe rliar the day had finally arrived for 
our graduation. Admiral Arthur W. Radford, 
Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff, presented the 
graduation address and then began the presenta- 
tion of diplomas by giving number 1 graduate 
Dick Shafer his diploma. As tin Fourteenth Com- 
pany arose Jim Visage was carried to the shoulders 
of his company-mates and recognized as the 
Anchor Man. Not many minutes later our caps 
were in the air and outside Dahlgren Hall our 
boards and bars were put on by mothers and 
sweethearts. As we looked back and saw the 
Academy for the last time as members of the 
Brigade we experienced a mixed feeling of sad- 
ness and joy, but we were mostly happy to be 
starting on our careers. 



156 







Never may it be said that the men who compose the Brigade of Midshipmen 
have no constructive interests apart from the professional and military 
fields. Extra-curricular activities at the Naval Academy are many and varied, 
offering opportunities for self-expression and recreation as well as serving 
the useful purpose of broadening our education. From music to writing, 
chess to sailing, model train building to physics, and stamp collecting to public 
relations — is found the scope of the extra-curricular activities. 

The credit for the success of these activities belongs to the mids, the guys 
who have trouble finding time to shave or write their girls when the 
rush periods arrive, and the guys who are the members of the most active 
clubs and activities known in intercollegiate circles. 







Hill Hull Secretary. Mitch Hart Vice President, Merril Collier President, Frank Kelso Ti 



CLASS OFFICERS 

Throughout our stay at the Academy, particularly 
Second and Third Class years, our class officers often 
provided the means of expressing our ideas and gripes 
to the Executive Department. Working through the 
underclass organization, they also carried our policies 
to the underclass. Upon graduation these class leaders 
retain their offices and remain as guardians of the class 
fund. 



The company representatives, elected by each class 
in the twenty-four company units of tin- Brigade, serve 
as the voice by which each class expresses its opinions 
to "the brass." The) handle current problems of the 
Brigade and act as the arms for implementing the 
policies of the class. During First Class year they work 
closely with the Brigade stripers and help to determine 
the much discussed method of choosing service. 



COMPANY REPRESENTATIVES 



Dick Thomas, Bob Rodccrs, Bob Shumakcr, Harlaml Swanson, John 
Baals, George Rosenhauer, Rick Clingensmith, Ross Cook. Jim 
Shortridge, John Slaugh, John Putnam, Keith Phillips, Vince Roper, 
Don (liiratn. Charlie Dibona, Charlie Baggs, Ray Kostosky, Don 
Hugdall, lack Bossert, Jack Kelly. Jim In. Not shown/ Wall) 
Skene. Murray Nicholson. Glenn Good. 









Bob Rodgers, John Baals, Ray Kostesky, Merril Collier, Jack Bossert, John Slaugh, Bill Hull, Glenn Good. 



BRIGADE EXECUTIVES 



The Brigade Executive Committee is composed of the 
Brigade Captain and each battalion's First Class repre- 
sentative. The president of the First Class presides and 
the secretary of the First Class acts as recorder. Its 
primary purpose is to act as the senior honor committee, 
hearing reported honor violations and making recom- 
mendations on each case. 



CLASS CREST AND 

RING COMMITTEE 




161 



On the third finger of his left hand the Academy grad- 
uate carries a lifetime product of the Class Crest and 
Ring Committee. The artistic beauty of "that ring" can 
be attributed to the design section of this committee. 
On this same ring as well as on the sweater of many a 
lovely drag can be seen their other creation — the '56 
class crest. 



Standing: Ed Bennett; Ron Hudgens; Frank Smith. 

Silting: Tom Freeman; Forrest Crone, Chairman; George White. 




* *•*# •* 



*^ V *L^ 




Nick Brown. Raj Frankenburg, Merril Collier, Murray Nicholson, Bob Francis, Poppj Miller, Skip Furlong, 
Mike Higgins, Gene W oodruff, Worth Hobbs, Bob Harns. 



RING DANCE COMMITTEE 



The Reception Committee has the responsibility of 
acting as hosts for the many visiting teams thai come 
to the Naval Vcademj <>n weekends. While entertaining 
and guiding the visiting teams the committee enjoj s i me 
of the best sources of contact between tin- Brigade and 
other schools and helps to strengthen the Brigade's 
bonds of intercollegiate friendship. 



In fore Christmas during ourThird Class year the King 
Dance Committee began to plan for the big nighl when 
we would receive oui rings. I hi committee was composed 
of the second class members of the Hop Committee 
plus one other class repn si ntative I rum each battalion. 
The committee made thi Ring Danci an evening never 
to I" forgotten. 



RECEPTION COMMITTEE 



Battalion Representatives — Bill Smith, Rudy Daus, Joe Anthony, John Boyd, Mort Hanson, \ I I wi Gene Woodruff. 






With its member elected from each Battalion, the 
Brigade Hop Committee is responsible for planning and 
decorating the Academy hops and the Brigade Cotillion 
after the Army game. Although the Committee focuses 
its attention on the major hops such as the Christmas, 
Easter and costume hops, it endeavors to make all such 
social functions more interesting and enjoyable for the 
Brigade. 




HOP COMMITTEE 



Charlie Wilson, Gene Woodruff, Jim Lakey, Bob Scanlon, Frank Lamotte, Worth Hobbs — Chairman. 
Merrill Collier, Murray Nicholson, Bob Francis, Ron Amon, Poppy Miller. 




Rogei Lyle, Chairman; Buzz Mann, Ben lack Kinney, Doc Blanchard, Commander Drew 5 Wilson 

Rook, Vic Prushansky, Steve RurTncr, Bob rhoeny, Dick Mil Herb Hoppe, Ed Mann. Norbcrt Melnick, 

Tom Timothy. Jack O'Donncll, Hill Smollen. 




BRIGADE ACTIVITIES 

[Tie Brigade Activities Committee, through its pep- 
rallies, team-send-offs, smokers, and postei displays, 
strives ro keep morale ar a high level. Providing cheer- 
leaders, lecumseli warpainters, and Hoar designers for 

the Army game, this talented committee purs forth 
efforts which make its presence felt as much as any 
activity. The Brigade extends a salute ro the rah-rah 
hoys. 



The Lion sets BAG treatment. 




Tectimseh obtains another 



164 




Smoke Ha smokers raised the spirit. 




Dick Petersen, treasurer; Jim Flatley, president; Father Walsh, Rod Flannery, vice-president; Jack Kelly, secretary. 



The Newman Club is the organization which pro- 
vides entertainment and instruction for midshipmen in 
topics dealing with all aspects of Catholic life. By spon- 
soring lectures by noted Catholic men in a variety of 
fields and holding tea dances, the Newman Club helps 
provide the midshipmen with some of the spiritual 
values to round out his Academy life. 



N.A.C.A. 



NEWMAN CLUB 



The Naval Academy Christian Association meets on 
Sunday nights and features speakers and musical pro- 
grams to suit the tastes of many people. Lady Astor 
and "Red" Barber have been among the speakers. 
Under the guidance of the chaplains this club uses its 
funds to provide each graduating midshipman with a 
Bible suitable to his faith. 



Sitting: Gene Sullivan, president; Chaplain Zimmerman. Standing: Ken Miller, Wayne Wills, Dave Broyles, vice- 
president, Kent Lawrence, Jim Bibb, Jack Tillman, secretary; Stuart Lustfield, treasurer. 






The Antiphonal Choir, of more than a hundred 
voices, supplements the Chapel Choir during Sunda) 
church services. From its balcony position in the rear 
of the Chapel, the choir adds a striking effect with its 
antiphonal "Echoes" in anthems and Gregorian chants. 
The versatile choir has recently recorded a mcdlcv of 
N avy songs. 



CHAPEL CHOIR 



ANTIPHONAL CHOIR 



Never tailing to inspire worshipers with its hymns 
and anthems, the Chapel Choir concludes Sunday 
services with its traditional "Eternal Father, Strong 
to Save." Famous for appearances in surrounding en- 
virons and its annual production of Handel's "Mes- 
siah," the choir has also appeared on TV and in movies, 
the most recent of which was "Cinerama Holiday. " 






#2 



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CATHOLIC CHOIR 



Choral singing in a light vein is provided by the Glee 
Club. Providing the nucleus of talent for Musical Club 
Shows, the Glee Club's activities also include trips to 
nearby colleges, appearances on TV, and various con- 
certs. The high light of the year is the June Week pro- 
gram presented in Mahan Hall for mids, drags, families, 
and guests. 



To most people the thought of rising and singing at 
six-thirty in the morning is an appalling one, but to the 
members of the Catholic Choir this is a part of every 
Sunday. The primary mission of the choir is to provide 
the music for the masses here at the Naval Academy, 
but at various times throughout the year they fill re- 
quests to sing in other nearby churches. 



GLEE CLUB 








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I he Concert Band is run and conducted entirely l>\ 
midshipmen. Its schedule culls for everything from pre- 
breakfast pep rallies and smokers r < ■ messhall dinner 
music and Formal concerts ar the Naval Vcademy and 
various colleges. Despite man) public appearances th< 
main purpose of the Concert Band is to provide relaxa- 
tion tor the members and an opportunity to play good 
music. 



Foi the smooth strains of the midnight medlej ai 
many Brigade hops, and foi the roaring, bouncing 
Dixieland of several pre-game smokers, the \ V-10 was 
a favorite band ol man} a mid. This orchestra provided 
an outlet for the musicians in the Brigade and proved 
again the calibre "I the talent to l><- found within Man- 
Hall. 



CONCERT BAND 



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DRUM AND BUGLE CORPS 



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The Drum and Bugle Corps is the organization which 
supplies the music to which we march at meal forma- 
tions. Consisting of seventy-five men, the "D & B" is 
much more than a glorified "cadence counter." It has 
a fine reputation as a marching unit from its precision 
drill and excellent music at parades and football games. 
While it bears the brunt of many jokes, it cannot be 
denied that the Drum and Bugle Corps is one of the 
foremost music activities of the Brigade. 



Gollehon, Wilson, Fitzwilliam, Harris, Mor 



WINTER 




169 




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PROPERTY GANG 



Dan Leonard, Bob Newman, Doug White, 
John Robertson, Charlie Baggs, Ray 
Williams, Bill Sachse, Dick Allen. Harold 
Hunter, Bob Lanoue. 



For almost every kind of entertainment there 
are many behind-the-scenes performers who 
never enjoy the applause of an appreciative 
audience. The Property Gang is one of the 
Brigade's primary examples of this. With their 
hammers and saws they provide the scenery 
and props which contribute so much to the 
success of the Masquerader's plavs and the 
Musical Clubs' Shows. 




The Make Up Gang demonstrate their tal- 
ents in transforming run of the mill midship- 
men into stellar actors and actresses. Their 
work has been observed by the Brigade in the 
Masquerader's presentation of "Room Ser- 
vice," and the Musical Club Show "Pieces of 
Eight." It is no small feat to make up the char- 
acters required by the various scripts. For this 
reason a well done to Al Haddad and his Gang. 



Kneeling: Al Haddad, Joe Egan. Stand- 
ing: Frank Smith, Jim Moore, Rog Betts, 
Bob Brown. 



MARE UP GANG 



173 





The department heads and idea men get together to plan a forthcoming issue. 



In the dark basements of Bancroft amid typewriters, 
stacks of paper, glue pots, and scissors is an office identi- 
fied by a small sign reading, "LOG." In this small office 
the LOG staff works and worries to place their maga- 
zine on each Midshipman's desk every other Friday. 
Few of us can appreciate the energy and work required 
- to meet those constantly recurring deadlines. Not only 
is it a big cycle; but the added problem of deadlines for 
the next issue before the present issue is out is handy to 
keep those fellows busy. The continuous maximum 
effort somehow did not leave the prolific staff stale, for 
each issue was a fresh source of humor and interesting 
articles on music, sports, and Academy gossip as well as 
fiction, professional articles and always lots of pics. 
ComLOG Mitch Hart was always handy with lots of 
ideas and suggestions. And there was always that last 
minute run to get the copy on the bus before formation. 



Busy at makeup during one of the 
bi-monthly weekends devoted to the 
Log- 




Starting up the ladder, John Estes attempts to sell an 
ad to a Crabtown merchant. 



Tom Weisner makes the attempt to sell a subscrip- 
tion for the girl back home. 




175 



/ 



, 





Bill Mexander, Bill Leslie, Roi; Betts, Jim Ransom. 



Meanwhile, in another part of the Hall, we hiul a 
determined aggregation struggling to meet the bi- 
monthly deadline foi the I < •( !'s big little brother, the 
5P1 l\ I I R. Lashing the whip from tin- editor's chair 
is k "Who'll t.iki- ru.. pages?" Betts, while Jay 
"Where tin II 's your article?" Ransom, managing 

editor, sits idl) In doodling with a b iwed pencil. \nd 

scribbling m.ulk t>> till the pages .n< Bill Alexander, 
associate editor; Charlu Bay r, spoils; Rand II 
features; \l rl Marks, photography; Bill Leslie, .ur. 
.mil othei such stalwarts .is A' Thacher, JoeFenieh, 
Wedlock, Jack II. . km M alley, 

• i Hi. 

n are tli> mids fli.it put out the "little mag," the 
niic that's nevei serious, nevei \<\u. enough to shine 

on, ii"t even ;ilu;i\s good . . . I>m nevei dull, 

the same, nevei predictable, ["here's probablj not 
another publication at I SN \V that reflects ili< m.ils 
and triumphs of the Brigade better than thi SPLIN- 
TER. Foi laughs, spells, jokes, features, intramurals, 
i artoons, drags, and always unique pus and storii s on 
what's going on around Crabtown, the mills and theii 
girls know where to look . . . < very other Friday . . . 

] INTER. 




1u 

m ** i \cademy 

VnUe 1 1956 
february 




Executive Council — Squirt Crone. Ray Frankenburg, Dan Food, Paul Bradmiller, John 
Sterling, John Slough, Duane Heisenger, Roger Lyle, Al Granger, Cdr. Perry. 



ry-i 



Trident Staff — Dick Mozier, John Sterling, Al Fazekas, Dick Charles. 



The aim of the Trident Magazine is to keep the 
Brigade abreast of all the news of a military nature. 
Through articles covering the Naval post-graduate pro- 
gram, duty stations, and items on naval and aviation 
developments this aim has been fulfilled. The Trident 
also extended its coverage to foreign affairs and inter- 
views with outstanding men of the naval service. This 
year the staff made a successful attempt to bring the 
calibre of the format and appearance up to the level of 
the literary material. 

The Executive Council of the Trident Society is the 
parent organization of the seven subsidiary organiza- 
tions which provide a medium for the publication and 
expression of the literary, artistic, photographic, and 
professional talents of the Brigade. The year 1955-1956 
saw several new activities instituted by the Society. 
Guest speakers, who were experts in their field, were 
invited to address the Brigade. In addition the contests 
sponsored by the Society were increased in scope to 
include a new battalion choral group contest to provide 
an additional musical outlet for the midshipmen. 




177 




Wayne Weeks, Bob Cicil, ["om Northam, Jim Brunncr, Rogci Lylc, Mike 
Miller, Al Granger, Chairman; Paul Bradtmiller, Business Man 
Audilet, Buzz Mann. 



CHRISTMAS CARD 
COMMITTEE 

Die objective ol the Christmas Card Committee is to 
provide a Christmas card for rlu- midshipmen which is 
both distinctive and typical of the Naval Vcademy. They 
are also in charge of procuring and distributing the 
graduation announcements for the tirst class. The com- 
mittee is composed ol hist and second classmen who an 
interested in this opportunity to associate with na- 
tional!) known companies and gain experience in the 
production of the cards. 




LIBRARY COMMITTEE 

II Committee has as its duties the care and 

supervision ol the Bancroft Hall Regimental Libraries. 
I In ii .in iv'.. i oi these libraries, and theii purpost is to 
provide midshipmi n with readilj accessibli reading and 
material. I he Libi ai < ommittee insures 
that tl ■ • ■ d with up-to-date hooks. The 

ninety-six midshipmen who stand library watches 
handle the daih. administrative functions involved in 
this to the Brig ide. 



Crone, I 



REEF POINTS 



- .in annual handbook specifically de- 
signed to aid the new Plehcs in adjusting to Naval 
Academy lite. It contains a brief history of the lite. 
customs and traditions of the Academy and the 
Naval Service. The store of Plebe knowledge found 
in Reef Points makes it truly the Plebe's Bible and 
ever handy companion. 




TRIDENT 



Manager; lack Kincrt, Business 

Manager; John Slouch. EclitOl I ic Mohcnstcin 

aror; Dean 'ant 




PHOTO CLUB 



The Photo Club of the Naval Academy was estab- 
lished to provide room and facilities for midshipmen in- 
terested in learning the techniques of photography- The 
members have a chance to show their picture-taking 
talents and at the same time improve their work through 
the Club's annual contests and regular activities. 



ART CLIB 



The purpose of the Art Club is three fold; to provide 
an exchange of artwork incident to various Naval Acad- 
emy publications, to improve the quality of work by the 
grouping of talent and the organization of material, and 
to stimulate and encourage an interest in art among 
midshipmen. Emphasis this year was placed on the de- 
velopment of silk screen reproduction for advertising 
posters and hop program covers. 




Duane Heisinger, president; Walt Peters, secretary-treasurer; Bob Harris, 
vice-president. 




Spence McManes, Dick Midgette, Rog Lyle, Kenmore McManes, Don Sacarob. 



Bob Harris, Pboto Editor; Squirt Crone, Art Editor; Don Flood, 
Business Manager; Bill Hull, Sales Manager; Ray Frankenberg, 
Editor-in-Chief; Chuck Knettles, Circulation Editor. 




TRIDENT CALENDAR 

One of the midshipman's closest companions is his 
Trident Calendar, which rests with official approval 
upon the top right corner of each Bancroft Hall desk. 
With it he keeps track of all his many appointments 
and of other coming events. A well done to the men 
who edited this year's calendar. 




179 




lillard 
Allen, Vdveni 





Jim Taylor 







180 



/"* 



Years Editor 






"Lucky Bag Biz" . . . How the mates must have hated 
seeing those words on the many notes that were vec- 
tored throughout the Hall during the preparation of the 
1956 Lucky Bag. From a slow beginning during Young- 
ster year through the many hours of work on biographies 
during Second Class year to the headaches and sweat of 
deadlines during First Class year, the staff worked hard 
to put together the kind of book that we hope will 
tickle your memories in the coming years. Our goal has 
been to provide you with the stimuli to prompt you to 
say, "Why, that reminds me of when I . . ." 

Perhaps the biggest change in this edition of the Bag 
from those of recent years is the placing of the First 
Class biographies alphabetically by the class instead of 
the military divisions of battalions or companies. There 
was a definite reason for doing this. During our four 
years at the Naval Academy the Class of 1956 was 
changed from a heterogeneous mass of boys from all 
over the country into a body of men who will feel a 
loyalty towards each other for many years. Many times 
we felt like guinea pigs as we became the victims of new 
ideas. Some of these ideas were good and others were 
bad; but all had the effect of bringing us closer together. 
The result of the passage of the many events during our 
four years will be evident throughout our careers. Al- 
though no one knew all of his classmates, we will 
recognize a face or a name in some far corner of the 
world and a friendship will be renewed. It will make no 
difference whether we were old liberty buddies or 
whether we simply passed each other on the way to and 
from class — we are classmates. 




Dick Smith 
EditoT-in-Chiej 




Dick Roberts 

Business Manager 




Duane Eggert 

Biographies Editor 





Sid Davis 

Advertising Manas 




Bob Harris 

Underclasses Edito 



Bob Keller 

Circulation Manager 



181 




( lien Jermstead, l»<»i> Harris, I hom Brov 



Contract decisions during J c vear were serious business. 




I he job ■>) compiling .1 yearbook is l>iu at anj school 
and we experience .1 few extra peculiarities hen .it 
\l".iit tin time ••111 iniiuls had switched from 
slide rule manipulating <<< typi pounding it u.is 

time i" tn.iki .1 in .t In 1 formation. Howi v< r, th( switch 
was in. uli .mil pages were completed in time to m.ikt 
deadlines almost. 

I he section editors and their assistants dew 1 \ > must 
i>l the credit lor >lm I >< »< » k . !>ut man) oth< 1 people were 
before the final cop) had been sent to the 
printer. I the photographers, business staffs, and 1 om- 
pany representatives as well as the editorial stall u.<, mj 
thanks foi .i job well done. 



Company repn 

John Schulze 
1 It ne W oodruff 
Hob Shumaker 
\l Andrade 
Jim Flatlej 
Max Baldwin 
Bob Smiley 
Jim Johnson 
Glen Ball 
Bob Williams 
Doug Hayman 
Bill Everett 



foi I95( 

Bob Perry 
John Macan 

Barron M 
Bill Hull 
Dick Tarbuck 
Ed Toohey 
Rex McAlister 
Doug Mavrield 
Ko(i Betts 
Kred Adams 
lax Smith 





Bud Alexander, Sports, and Mike McBride, Four Years, could be called 
honorary editors for their respective sections. They both worked long hours 
and did a fine job when the editors found themselves in the hospital. 



Chuck Chavatria, Art Editor, stands between his two assist- 
ants, Carl Triebes and Jose Ibarra. 




183 



« 






PROFESSIONAL 
CLUBS 







r I - 



I. on Quad 



... Bill Stiles, Krank In 
Irail, Ron l.indcr. 




Kiul Mexander. Jim l..\lm. I ' [im Brunncr. Charlie Corkint, 

Inn I 11 S . Dick Petersen, secretary; |im Van Metre, director; Mile.- Miller, 
ctor: Jim \\ o\\ erton, liar. 



PIBLK RELATIONS COMMUTE! 

I" acquaint the brigade and the public with the 
man) events of interest .it i In Wademj h.is been i In 
traditional misM.ni ..) the Public Relations Committee. 
W Mikwii: hand in hand with the Sports Publicity Offici 
..l the \ \ \ \. the sports departmi nt covered and an- 
nounced most of the numerous Varsitj and Plebi con- 
tests. \s anothei sen ice the committee responded each 
yeai to th( press request foi aid in covering the man) 
June W i •' k events. 

FORENSIC ACTIVITY 

\lthrnij»h traditional!) devoted to debating a< rh ities 
the Forensic \ctivitj expanded its interests this yeai to 
include other speaking events and ;i most important 
new function public relations speeches. In r In- lattei 
capacity the activity has carried the i olors to se< ondarj 
schools from Maine t>. Florida. Guided bj professors 
from the EH&G Department, the Forensii \ctivit) 
seeks f.. develop effective public speakers among the 
ranks <>t our nation's future officers. 

FOREIGN RELATIONS CLUB 

I he Foreign Relations (_'lul> held many seminars. 
banquets, and speeches during the year to further ac- 
quaint the members of the Hrigade with the foreign 
policy of the United States. Realizing that the service 
officer should have a broad knowledge of our foreign 
policy, the Foreign Relations Club strived to acquaint 
the future officer with the basic knowledge needed to 
understand his country's position in the world of today. 



184 



WRNV 





The Voice of the Intercollegiate Broadcasting System 
in Annapolis, Radio Station WRNV, with studios and 
transmitters in Bancroft Hall is owned and operated by 
the Brigade of Midshipmen. Together with the portable 
sound unit, the station serves to provide the Brigade 
with Academy-wide coverage of important events and 
with hours of pleasant music. A tribute to midshipmen 
skill and knowledge, the radio station is composed of 
home-made equipment, designed, built, and operated 
by members of the Brigade. 



JUICE GANG 



Midshipmen with a bent for electrical engineering 
find an outlet for creative activity in the Juice Gang. 
Planning and operating illumination controls for pro- 
ductions in Mahan Hall is one of the major projects. 
Others include the design and construction of those in- 
genious signs flashing from the Mahan Hall clock tower, 
or those adorning Bancroft Hall with "Go Navy — Beat 
Army — 6 for 6." 



185 




ENGINEERING 



MECHANICAL 



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Jim Whclan i. nt; I- rank Zeclilin, president . Nick Schleicher, sccrctan -treasurer. 



AERONAUTICAL 

projects, interests, and activities "I the \li 
ih.iini.il Engineering Club members have been as >li 
versified as theii imaginations tins yeat I!<m.1<s the 
iveckl) movies in Smoke 1 1 .J I and the let tures in Memo- 
rial ll.ill, tin clubs carried oui many otht i intt resting 
.ni>l stimulating activities I li> n an six different 
branches of the Combined Eingint i im^ c Hubs, and t at Ii 
is devoted '" .1 special activity "I us own. For instance 
the Mechanical Engineering brand ted tli<- chal- 

■l tin possibilities in .i Phillips \n Engine.While 
tin \ll men lnuhl anew, the \uto Engineers takt a 
searching look .it oui present < ngint :s. Procuring .i used 
cat engine, the club membt rs plan i" test ne« idt as i"i 
tin- improvemt er. In addition to 

.i wind -tunnel project the aviation branch attended 
P tuxent River, the Nike guided missile sta- 
MiiitliMiin.in Institute, and the \berdeen Proving 



Chuck Charncco, prcsidi nt; Hal M 
lohnso iret. 



NAVAl CONSTRUCTION 

[WBBSL £. 





CLUBS 



PHYSICS 



Front Rozv: Jim Yarnadore, John McMorris, Larry Fisler, Bob Betcher, Phil 
Simpson. Rear Row: George David, Terry Magrath, Del Snyder, Paul 
Stiller. Standing: Jim Wollerton. 



AUTOMOTIVE 

Grounds. The Naval Constructors made visits to the 
David Taylor Model Basin and the Bethlehem Steel 
works on Sparrows Point. To round their year's program 
they had some very interesting speakers on carrier con- 
struction and destroyer development. Probably the 
most ambitious project of all was started in the field of 
nuclear physics by the Physics Club. Untold hours of 
effort and sweat in the face of mounting opposition 
found them still hopeful that their project, a huge cyclo- 
tron, will be completed within the next few years. To 
the guided missile experts of tomorrow, we doff our caps. 
The Electrical Engineering branch members have been 
receiving first hand information from excellent speakers 
on such subjects as "The Control of Guided Missiles" 
and "Electrocution." Trips to the AIEE conferences 
and movies on their special interests provide a full 
curriculum for the E-IR men. 



ft; 


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|Pv ; '''. v%" ' Mar"^ 

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Dick Gentz, Vice-President; Hank Page, Secretary-Treasurer; Joe Weurtz, 
President; Ed Burke, Program Chairman. 



ELECTRICAL 




Left to right: Wendall Lueker. Vice-Pres- 
ident; Stocky Gaines, President; Bob 
Rositzke, Secretary-Treasurer. 



187 




CLUB PRESIDENTS Lou Cusachs, Pete Fitzwilliams, lonj Pcrrone, 
Jim Taylor. \ Nick Brown, Rudj Daus . . . 




FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

The Foreign Language Clubs were formed to afford 
those midshipmen interested an opportunity for :i cul- 
tural understanding of tin- nation whose language they 
studied. I Inn activities include banquets, movies, rec- 
ords, discussions, skirs, and singing. Tins year the Club 
brought an international flavoi to si. ml Dahlgren I hill 
1>\ sponsoring ;i hop. 



( BESS CLUB 

I ade thai pawn, takf tli.n knight, (,'luss IV;im. 
Chess 1 1 .mi. h>;lit. fight, iiLiln '" I In butt ol many 
jokes, the Naval \cademy's participants in the game ol 
kin^s. represent oui school in man) intercollegiati 
matches. Some are played awaj likr tin \nn\ match 
in New "S " -r k bin ni"st .in played in Mem I hill where 
anyone ma) watch the l">\s tradi blows on Sunda) 
aftei ii""iis 



\l\lll (1(1 



S Hal I 

Gaines, Frank latum. 



I In Math Club consists "i midshipmen int< rested in 
theoretical mathematics .il><>\' the classroom level. 
Members and guest speakers discuss such subjects as 
relativity, non-Euclidean , diophantine equa- 

tions, .mil asymptotic series. Each /eai a team is en- 
tered in the William Lowell Putnam Mathematical 
Competition in which the) compete with othei under- 
graduates throughout tin- country. 



■ larcncc 

. • >■■ 
. incc Jamison. \ i 



HOBBY 



188 




STAMP CLUB 

The Naval Academy Stamp Club is an organization 
which fosters interest in stamp collecting at the Acad- 
emy. By trading and buying from each other, members 
can often pick up stamps which would otherwise be un- 
available to them. Guest speakers and field trips to 
various auctions and displays permit members to add 
to their knowledge of philately. 



MODEL RAILROAD CLUB 

Winding through the mountain terrain of the First 
Wing basement is the model railroader's delight, The 
Chesapeake and Allegheny Route. Complete with tun- 
nels, bridges, sidings and switch yard, the layout is a 
realistic backdrop for the tiny rolling stock. The ban- 
danna-clad engineers are justly proud of their railroad 
in miniature. 



RADIO CLUB 

W3ADO is the call of the Radio Club's ham station 
which consists of two main transmitters and receivers. 
The club has about 25 active members, and about 12 
of them have their licenses. In the past the station has 
become a part of the Maryland emergency phone net in 
order to report on hurricanes. The members often make 
use of the radio to talk to their friends or families at 
home. 




Sitting: Cliff Schoep, Vice-President; Lt. W. D. Hoggard, Jack Apple, Pres- 
ident. Standing: Phil Gallagher, Graydon Lombard, Larry Larson, Dan 
McGurl, John Wright, Walt Booriakian. 




Steve Ritchie, Joe Talbert, Vice-President; Bob Quinn, President; Dan 
. Mickey, (not shown) Jack Weston, Secretary-Treasurer. 



Seated: Rov Hejhall, Jim McCoy. Standing: Bill Curry, Jim Norton, Dave 
Bertke, Bill Smith. 




CLUBS 



189 




Welsh, I n 
Lynch, Corresponding Secretary. 



t; John Hopk I om 



"N" CLUB 

Composed « > t" -ill Varsitj "N" winners in .ill sp"itx. the 
"N" Club represents the finest of \cademj athl 
club is active in supporting pep rallies and creating inti 
in the lesser known sp< >rr ^. Several booster banquet! 
held throughout the m-.it. hut the club's most elab 
affair is rlu- fune Week "N" Dance in Hubbard I hill. 



G0ATKEEP1RS 

I raditionall) . .1 position "i honoi is that enjoyed by the 
• Hill. rh<- Vi . ti 'I from the ranks 

of those football players who have used up theii eligibility . 
tin- g I qualified to keep Hill in fighting 

trim. The> take Hill t.. ;ill rlu important athletic events 
which the Brigade attends. 



Boh Craig, Lcn Benzi. 




190 



POLITICAL ECONOMY CLUB 

The Political Economy Club is a new organiza- 
tion which arose out of the interest shown by mid- 
shipmen in economic problems. Controversial 
topics are presented for discussion at each meeting. 
Every other week the club enlists the services of a 
distinguished guest speaker who often brings new 
light to the listeners on theory versus practice in 
many economic fields. 



JUDO CLUB 

The Judo Club was provisionally organized a 
year ago under the direction of Karl Kitt, who as 
a Black Belter has attained one of the highest 
levels of the judo art. In the beginning this group 
of judo trainees was plagued with many problems. 
Practice had to be held whenever and wherever 
possible. Often Wednesday afternoons and Sun- 
day liberty had to be sacrificed; but the devoted 
remained to master this Oriental art. 




Dan Flaherty, Bob Harris, Gene McPartland. 




Leo Sheehan, Secretary-Treasurer; Bob Craven, President; Jay Lindquist, Vie 
President. 



Dave Wiggland, Jim Ballentine, Dick Pierson, Jim Townsend, Bob Beeler, John Slough, 
Lt. P. E. Smith, Bob Perry. 




GUN CLUB 

The newly formed Midshipman's Gun Club was 
organized in order that mid'n may further then- 
interests in firearms both from the professional 
and personal points of view. The scope of the club 
includes most of the activities of interest to gun 
enthusiasts. Everything from shooting and re- 
loading of ammunition to the rebuilding or even 
building of weapons is provided for. 



191 




. 



no.vr (i.ut 



Karl Peterson, Vice-Commodoi ; Nick Brown, Commodore; John 
nam, Rc;ir CommoJorc; Art Wright, Treasurer; Don II 




The Boat Gub is the Brig icht club, serving as 

.it point of interest in sailing and yacht-racing 
among tin- midshipmen. Dunns rlu Fall and Spring tin- 
Hoar CI it I > organizes racing programs in which mid- 
shipmen race against one another as well as against the 
top civilian yachts and crews on the Ch< sapeake. I he 
club offers lectures l>\ accomplished yachtsmen, oppor- 
tunities to learn how to keep boats in their best racing 
condition, and training for the sailing examinations 
given by the Seamanship and Navigation Department. 



192 





DUANE C. EGGERT 

SECTION EDITOR 



From the towns, villages, farms and cities throughout 

our great nation, we ventured forth to Crabtown. We were a 

jumbled assortment of people then, but we all had the 

same great expectations. As we donned the Navy Blue, we 

knew there were to be no more high school proms or 

college fraternity parties. Our jobs in business, industry 

and the armed forces had been left behind. Kid brothers had 

taken over the hot-rods, the booths in the corner drug 

stores, the lawnmowers and paint brushes we had 

used around home. A new .\^d difficult challenge lay before 

us as we took the oath in Memorial Mall. Now, although 

we are fewer in number, we have become a homogeneous class, 

confident and ready to assume the responsibilities a 

commission in our country's service entails. 




f~ 






# -T 







f ■ 
















n 





OHIO 

John Bellinger 
Larry Berger 
Emil Block 
Dave Broylet 
Jim Clark 
Merrill Collier 
Del Cory 
Ed Covey 
Paul Cusick 
Sid Dovis 
Don Dudrow 
Fred Eylar 
Al Foxekas 
Hoot Foote 
Frank Grahom 
Don Horvalh 
Frank Ingram 
Wall Jennings 
Dick Kauffman 
Rick Klingensrr 
Bob Lamb 
Ken Miller 
Dave Minton 
Hal Moore 
Jan Prokop 
Ned Roberts 
Bob Scanlon 
Willy Schoessel 
John Slough 
Bill Stewart 



MINNESOTA 
Willie Auer 
Dave Fjelsted 
Roy Hcjhall 
Don Hugdohl 
John Karat 
Tom Lompto 
Dan McGroth 
Jim Olson 
Cliff Peterson 
Bob Rodgers 
Dick Romero 
Dave Shelso 
Jim Shortrtdgo 
Dave Sibley 
Johnny Wilde 
Gene Wrobcl 
Bob Zimmerman 



Bill Black 
Jim Brunncr 
Dave Debus 
Nat Devoll 
Bob Diedrich 
Dewey Eggert 
Pete Fitxwilliam 
George Gotlehon 
Don Hanson 
Lyell Harris 
Dick Levendoski 
Tom Lynch 
Mac McLaughlin 
Wayne Osgood 
Pete Petersen 
George Pitxer 
Rosy Roscnhaue 
Ed Schddhouer 
Dick Shafer 



Fred Adorns 
Dick Allen 
Glenn Ball 
Tom Benson 
Ralph Bird 
Bosh Boshoven 
Rog Box 
Joe Docblcr 
Hal Dolenga 
Frank Drayton 
Ray Fleming 
John Grant 



Bill Hagenmeyer 
Ron Hudgens 
Sam Koutas 
Bill Labor g-.- 
Rog Lyle 
Chan Mcdwedeff 
Dave Palmer 
Swiffy Sampson 
John Sterling 
Jim Stinson 
Dave Teachoul 
Dook Walker 




ILLINOIS 

Paul Brodtmiller 
Walt Corlson 
Squirt Don.- 
Bill Dillon 
John Ell. on 
Jerry Fulk 
Jerry Gibson 
Jim Gillman 
Clyde Hohcnsten 
Bob Jaeger 
Gunnor Jenson 
Jim Johnson 
Dave Lloyd 
Bun Mann 
Mike Miller 
Ernie Olds 
Ted Olivcrio 
Chet Pilcher 
Bob Ouinn 
Robbie Robertso 
Bill Shannon 
Hal Smith 
Don Stone 
Dick Terrell 
Jim Visage 
Jack Wilson 



INDIANA 
Ross Cook 
Rex Davis 
Tom Edgar 
Bill Elpers 
Tom Freen- 
Joe Harrison 
Bob Perry 
Gene Sasso 
Joe Wucrix 
Tom Weisner 



OUTSIDE OF CONTINENTAL 
UNITED STATES 
BERMUDA 
Norm Frith 

HAWAII 

Al Andrade 
Bill Hull 

PERU 

Mario Sanchei-Carrion 

PHILIPPINES 
Vic Brillantes 
Bob Smiley 
Willie Viray 

PUERTO RICO 
Jerry Jones 



ARKANSAS 
Harry Barnes 
Skip Furlong 
Poppy Owen 
Joe Pope 
Bill Slaughter 
Gene Woodruff 



Millard Allen 
Dave Carre 
Don Cook 
Louis Cusachs 
Don Flood 
Steve Gauthreoux 
Jules Gervait 
Ross Hatch 
Dixie Howell 
John Legendre 
Andy Piske 
John Putnam 



MISSISSIPPI 
Vic Baricev 
Ken Costitow 
George Deceit 
Hal Ellis 
Guy Jorratt 
Herb Kuykendall 
Jim Smith 
Gene Sullivan 
Maurice Tyler 
Wayne Wills 



RHODE ISLAND 
Nick Brown 
Howie Burdick 
Walt Denham 
Dan Flaherty 
Ray Fronkenberg 
Link Mossop 
Bob Motherway 
Ben Short 
Danny Sullivan 



MAINE 

Bruce Clark 
Dave La Jeunes 
Ted Lewin 
Bill Niles 
Bill Whitaker 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 
Byron Cyr 
Pierce Ferriter 
Hal Lewis 



VERMONT 
Jim Detore 
Bob Park 
Steve Sargent 



VEST VIRGINIA 
Dave Chartrand 
George Heidrich 
Benny Poe 
Tom Scott 




Bob Allen 
Al Barlow 
Rog Betts 
Mickey Brown 
Slug Butts 
Leroy Collins 
Corky Corkins 
Skip Dyer 
Fred Evans 
Bill Green 
Bill Henry 
Rog H 
Sam Mays 
Jim McCoy 
Tom Northam 
Bob Smith 



SOUTH CAROLINA 
Charlie Baggs 
Cranny Boensch 
Dan Gorges 
John Henry 
John McCravy 
Jim Sikes 
Tigue Tobin 



GEORGIA 
Bob Baker 
Fred Culberson 
Charlie Hansen 
Af Henry 
Dale Herndon 
Wendy Powell 
Jax Smith 
Bill Stiles 
Wayne Weeks 



CONNECTICUT 
Mike Ahrens 
Dick Clock 
Jules Coolidge 
Steve Gardella 
Mike Gluse 
Jack Janetatos 
Hank Jordan 
Bob Keller 
Fred Lippert 
Ted Lovely 
Bruno Monson 
Dick Mozier 
Don Murphy 
Raleigh Piatt 
Jack Smaliman 
Steve Soltesz 
Con Stevenson 
Ed Toohey 
Rick Wilson 
Bob Zehnder 




DELAWARE 
Boom Cannon 
Jay Maston 
Jim Whelan 



MARYLAND 
Cliff Borden 
Clark BulMs 
Dick Carrigan 
George Clark 
Bill Cook 
Jim Evans 
Larry Hubert 
Gordy McGarry 
G. E. Morgan 
Al Morris 
Ed Mortimer 
Bill Musgrove 
Ken O'Dwyer 
Mark O'Hara 
Carl Picket 
Bill Price 
Pete Randrup 
Doug Rigler 
Jim Smith 
Norm Smith 
Barry Tibbitts 
Jim Van Metre 
Dick Varney 
Dick Walsh 
, Ed Wright 
I Pickett Wright 



NORTH CAROLINA 
Joe Anthony 
Jim Egerton 
Bill Everett 
Al Gaylor 
John Hicks 
Worth Hobbs 
Ed Hobson 
Bill Hunt 
Earl McCullers 
Lee McMillan 
Danny Michaels 
Poppy Miller 
Dick Shigley 
George Wilkins 



NEW JERSEY 
Jim Buddie 
Milt Burdsall 
Skip Cleveland 
George Connolly 
Nick Denunzio 
Bill Doerner 
Mike Dwyer 
Bob Forster 
Ken Godstrey 
Dick Guest 
Swede Hansen 
Herb Hoffman 
Hal Hussey 
Andy Jernee 
Art Keegan 
Jack Kelly 
Red Lynch 
Mike McBride 
George Mercuro 
Bob Milligan 
Charlie Mitri 
Al Newbury 
Jim Newcomb 
Pete Peterson 
Lou Pfeiffer 
Jay Ransom 
Bob Schatz 
Nick Schleicher 
Walter Schneider 
Marc Wolff 
Ed Zabrycki 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 
Buck Buchanan 
Ham Byng 
Jack Collins 
Bob Craven 
\ Dutch Deutermann 
Don Johnston 
Lloyd Kriner 
Dale McClure 
Jack Mclntyre 
Bob Morris 
Charlie Roberts 
Ed Sechrest 
Phil Sullivan 
Ted Taylor 



VIRGINIA 
Bob Allen 
Phil Brainerd 
Jim Flatley 
Hank Henry 
Jim Hogg 
Fred Hopewell 
Jack Kinert 
Hank Maines 
Mike Massey 
Wayne Miller 
Jim Murlland 

Bart Myers 

John Schulze 

Ted Schultz 

George Simpson 

Wally Skene 

Chris Stefanou 

Perry Stone 

John Webster 

Jim White 

Woody Woodbury 



MASSACHUSETTS* 
Jim Black 
Jim Brokaw 
Russ Burt 
Tim Cronin 
Paul Davidson 
Charlie DiBona 
Tom Farren 
Paul Fournier 
P. D. Graf 
Al Haddad 
Mort Hanson 
Vern Honsinger 
Phil Isaac 
Dick Jensen 
Choo Levis 
Chuck Mulloy 
Dick McDermott 
Dave Noonan 
Jerry O'Connell 
Ed Parker 
Al Reed 
Will Rich 
Dick Roberts 
Don Sacatob 
Leo Sheehan 
Steve Wise 



PENNSYLVANIA 
Ron Amon 
Ted Andrews 
Len Anton 
John Apple 
Bob Bachman 
Max Baldwin 
John Bauman 
Ed Bennett 
Pete Bennett 
Len Benzi 
Wally Bigler 
Jack Bossert 
Tom Brandt 
Bob Brown 
Matt Burt 
Chuck Chavarria 
Jack Clay 
Gene Denezza 
John Donahue- 
Bill Dunsavage 
Moose Eagye 
Tom Eaton 
Mike Elinski 
Tise Eyler 
Bill Flight 
Dick Gaines 
Ben George 
Walt Ghering 
Glen Good 
Al Granger 
Neil Groepler 
Law Groner 
Roy Gulick 
Frank Hadley 
Bob Harris 
Chauncey Hoffman 
Bob Jones 
Burt Laub 
Harry Lenhardt 
John Magagna 
Mai Malloy 
Cool Sam Morris 
George Mushalko 
Carl Nelson 
Hal Neuhard 
Garv Oaks 
Don Ogram 
Bill O'Keefe 
Vince Roper 
Jack Schaefer 
Fred Schilling 
Bob Schmitt 
Rich Seesholtz 
Ash Seip 
Jim Shillinglaw 
Bob Shumaker 
Dick Snyder 
Dick Swanenburg 
Jim Taylor 
John Wagner 
Glenn Warner 
Russ Weidman 
George Welsh 
Bob Williams 
Orv Wright 



NEW YORK 

Bud Alexander 
Jim Arnold 
Hal Bauduil 
John Boyd 
Dick Braun 
Jim Bruso 
Vern Bush 
Scott Chester 
Connie Coleman 
Jim Copeland 
Don Coyne 
Rudy Daus 
Bruce Dolph 
Neil Donovan 
John Egan 
Don Faust 
Rod Flannery 
Hank Friedel 
Paul Gambaran 
Chuck Garrison 
Jerry Green 
Don Grimes 
Charlie Hackeling 
Walt Hansen 
Lee Harding 
Bob Harmon 
Ted Herz 
John Hopkins 
Bob Houghton 
Ernie James 
Don Kennedy 
Mel Klein 
Ray Kostesky 
Frank Lamotte 
Phil Leahy 
Fred Lind 
Bill Loveday 
Mac MacDonald 
Gene McPartland 
Connie O'Shea 
Ed Parent 
Tony Perrone 
Bill Peters 
Rocket Reagan 
Paul Reese 
Bob Schade 
Ernie Scheyder 
Vince Schmidt 
Ray Schreiner 
Ralph Schwartz 
Tom Schwartz 
Mel Schweiger 
Jack Shanley 
Dick Shewchuk 
Pete Spink 
Dick Warren 
George Weigold 
Buzz Weltman 
George White 
John Wilde 
Frank Zechlin 



OREGON 
Boe Boeberl 
Hal Haddock 
Sam Hanna 
John Landi* 
Mac McDonell 



NEVADA 
Harry Hlckl 
Doug Osgood 



CALIFORNIA 

Don Alter 

St. v. Arnold 

Tom A*hwor1h 

Jim Blanehard 

Pete Booth 

Stan Booth 

Jo** Buctcelew 

John Buckley 

Norm Burgk 

Bob Cecil 

Chuck Chorneco 

Bob Craig 

Vern Dander 

Artmio Delgodo 

Rod Dre**or 

Phil Folo* 

John Forbrick 

Mick Grocno 

Duone Hei*ingcr 

Fred Ho.-m. - 

Ed Jamet 

Jim Komp 

Jim Kouti 

Chuck Knctile* 

Tom Kricger 

John Lolly — 

John Longenheim 
Tom Langley 
Frank Lewi* 
Doug Moyftcld 
Pot McCool 
Angu* McEachon 
Jim Milne 
Chuck Mi**lcr 
Chuck Murray 
Frank Murray 
Paul Nelson 
Sven Nel*on 
Tiger O'Connell 
Doug Ohmen 
Jim Orange 
Steve Porlin 
Sherb Schick 
Don Scovel 
Walt Stammer 
Joe Taff 
Joe Talbert 
Dick Tarbuck 
George Textor 
Jim Thomas 
Jim Townsend 
Tony Trent 
Dave Weggeland 
Dick White 
Larry While 
Ron Widner 
Jack Wilbern 



WASHINGTON 
Jim Barker 
Jack Binns 
Larry Marr 
Karl Peterson 
Perry Westmoreland 



IDAHO 
Von Bair 

Ken Dicker son 
George Kenaston 
Jim Lakey 



WYOMING 

George Bittner 
Bob Feslcr 
Ken Petch 
J. Westerhausen 



MONTANA 
Don Aitchison 
Ed Burke 
Fred Ernst 
Ray Hill 
John Nelson 




UTAH 

Ralph Jacobson 
Darrc-ll Jones 



ARIZONA 
Dick Bryant 
Jack Fellowe* 
Bob Grill 




Barney Barnhart 
Jim Cooper 
Jerry Fallin 
Doug Hayman 
John Macan 
Dean Sackett 
Cliff Schoep 
Ben Thompson 



COLORADO 

Tom Colman 
Chuck Curtis 
Fred Hale 
Stew Hannah 
Dave Maio 
Matt Ryan 
P. J. Wilson 



KANSAS 

George Biles 
Don Brown 
John Conway 
Jim Dickey 
Ted Fischer 
Jerry Johnston 
Gene Moore 
Ben Steele 
Leo Stockham 



NEW MEXICO 
Stan Catola 
Pat Ford 
Bob Francis 
Reed Lewis 
Dick Smith 
Herb Woods 



Audie Audilet 
Bob Berg 
R. J. Brown 
Tom Bruyere 
John Caldwell 
Don Douglas 
Gerry Gossens 
Mitch Hart 
Don Johnston 
Ben Jack Kinney 
Barry Leavey 
Jerry Masterson 
Frank McMullen 
Al McPherson 
Larry Nagel 
George Peterson 
Hugh Sams 
Willy Simpson 
Frank White 
Charlie Wilson 
Jim Wood 
John Wood 






FREDERICK GEORGE ADAMS 



L u din ton, M 



Claiming the best harbor on Lake Michigan .is his home, I- red alread) had ;i 
nautical aii about Inm when he landed a) Navj rech. With one year of highei 
education behind him ;it the I niversitj ol Michigan, Fred had little trouble 
adjusting i" Vcadenrn hit and excelling in the academic field. Fred's main 
interests in sports centered around i rack and ( ross country in which hi ■ ami <l 
letters Pli When ii came to the fairei sex, he had .1 Fascination foi 

student nurses, foi 1 med to make him feel right :it home. 



MICHAEL CORCORAN AHRENS 



I 



Mike set I ly in life and aftei graduation came 

to Navy via Hilder Prep. Being from New England, where thej learn Bailing 
before walking, he had no trouble earning a berth on the \ arsity Sailing 1 1 am. 
Winter would rind Mike chasing steeples 01 playing light weight football foi 
the Seventh. Mis liberty time was divided among the Newman Club, Boat 
Club, drag r the lack of skating at Na> and parties planned 

for the next leave. N time, Mike believes in making the most 

of ever) day, so he can fall into bed at night, exhausted and full of tin- jo) of 
accomplishment. 




DON EDWARD AITCHISON Billings, Montana 

\ yen for adventure led Aitch from tin- wooded rrails and secluded mountain 
lakes of Montana I where he was quick ro adapr to the Brigade. 

Spending his study hours in the rack, preferably in the sun. he yet maintained 
a starring average with ease. In addition to these academic achievements, he 
perfected a charm which never failed to please a drat: or a party crowd. As an 
athlete he soon exhausted the supply of boxing partners, and won many con- 
verts to his weight-lifting program. Aitch was living proof rhat difficult tasks 
could he made easy, and unpleasant ones adventurous. 




UNITED STATES 







^ 



SHERMAN GEORGE ALEXANDER 



Sherrill, New York 



After seven days of private life following high school graduation, Bud 
realized a lifelong ambition, and raised his right hand to become a midshipman. 
Always on the go, he seldom was ready for Morpheus at taps. His interests 
took him to the studios of WRNV where he brought the inhabitants of Ban- 
croft up to date on the latest from the sports world. His French education is 
best described in the phrase — "cherchez la femme." A good deal of time and 
mossbacks were spent at the Bell Telephone concessions and many weekends 
saw Bud on the "flying squadron." The rest of his time was spent at football, 
crew, and lacrosse, with occasional diversions to the slide rule. 



GEORGE MILLARD ALLEN, JR. 



Shreveport, Louisiana 



Shreveport claimed this hardy Southerner and solid Democrat, whose big 
heart and carefree manner won him many lasting friendships. Beneath his 
casual ways there was a sincerity and goodness that could readily be seen by 
all. Outside of being a good one man skit during the Dark Ages, Millard was 
a hard worker in the fencing loft of McDonough Hall. A destined military 
man, Millard came to the Academy via Marion Military Institute. Being a 
good man for any job, the day that Millard won his commission added another 
sharp lad with a lot of perseverance and efficiency to Uncle Sam's officers. 





RICHARD OWEN ALLEN. JR 



Greenbush, Michigan 



Had "Bagiogalluppi" entered Navy Tech when he graduated from high 
school, he would have been a member of the Plebe Summer indoctrination 
detail for the Class of 1956. In the intervening four years he attended Kenyon 
College, split logs as a lumberjack in the Michigan jackpines, and finally 
enlisted in the Navy. His deliberate and rational viewpoint gave him the 
ability to enjoy liberties to the utmost; on such occasions could be heard his 
definitely characteristic, but usually suppressed, violent laughter. Although 
not a cut by any means, Dick had an amazing knack to literally coast through 
the curriculum with very good marks. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



201 








UNITED STATES 



ROBERT ADDISON ALLEN. JR. 



Pensacola, Florida 



Bob, being .> Nav) Junior and having attended Severn Prep School, found 
little trouble in adjusting to Vcaderm life. His attractive black hair, together 
with ;i livewire personality brought him attention from every quarter. Most 
an) weekend he could be found dragging and eating submarine sandwiches 
i«» "i his favorite pastimes. Bob was constantly running someone aboul some 
friendly controversy, but his pet run was the one home to Norfolk. Mini 
workouts .1 week, h< tun ml. wen just n^lit for keeping in shape for t In Flying 
Squadron. 




DONALD JOSEPH ALSER 



Altadena, California 







(tut of sunn) California came "Mil; Don.'* with the <>nl\ water-cooled slnl< 
ruli in e> Before Ins arrival .it Navy, Dun had been an outstanding 

athlete and student .it John Mini College in Pasadena, and continued being 
the same ;it the \cademy. He w;is probabl) most .it home, during Ins four 
- here, out in I hompson Stadium, where he helped win man) Navy track 
meets with the javelin. I Inn tint; and fishing an tops on Ins hobb) list, < s|" 
ciall) ni the I !ii;li Si< rras .it homi . 1 1< could .>K\ .i\ s be counti il on foi .1 good 
time and Ins quick "it and eas) going nature made him liked In everybody. 
I" Dun. continued - wished l>\ all, in whatever tii-ld he undertakes. 



RONALD LEE AMON 



Wash . I' 



Having pi; tball f"i l»»ili Washington lliuli and Columbian Prep 

it was natural that Ron should continue his gridiron activitii s al the taadi 

.it on the Plebe team, he turned in twostellai ears for the 150 pound 
team as .1 Heel halfback before being elected Captain for his final season. 
Thoroughness characterized Run. and h Ian was del ailed to perfection. 

I sually quiet and reserved, he nevei hesitated to voice an opinion when he 
felt ir was warranted. Mways alert, attentive to duty and loyal to Ins friends, 
Ron will tit his uniform well. 





NAVAL ACADEMY 




ALLAN LEROY ANDRADE 



Honolulu, Hawaii 



Al "The Greek" is the pineapple land's big contribution to the class of '56. 
He came to USNA via Monterey Junior College, the University of Hawaii, and 
Bullis Prep. At the Academy he soon became known in the wrestling loft and 
on the volleyball courts. Al's favorite pastimes included going home, eating 
out on the weekends, and those long, long phone calls during study hour. He 
always managed to remain comfortably clear of the pitfalls of the academic 
departments. A ready smile and congenial nature were always Al's outstand- 
ing characteristics. 




CHARLES THEODORE ANDREWS Leechburg, Pennsylvania 

Ted walked out of the small coal town of Leechburg, into the confidence of 
all who associated with him. With a year in the USNR and a course of study 
at Wyoming Seminary Prep, Ted entered the Academy and proceeded to show 
all what could be done with a good effort and great amount of self-confidence. 
After academics, Ted spent most of his spare time with sports, especially Var- 
sity Football. One of his chief pastimes was giving council to the lovelorn who 
constantly sought his valued experience. His willingness to lend a helping hand 
when needed, and his pleasing disposition were the keynote of his stay here. 



JOSEPH DANIEL ANTHONY 



New Bern, North Carolina 



The Naval Academy did not change the easygoing, carefree manner that 
Joe brought with him from the ATO's at the University of the South. Although 
subjected to many attacks from the damnyankees, Joe has never struck the 
Stars and Bars. Hunting and fishing occupied a great part of his leave time. 
He did, however, travel independently to Germany during one leave. A former 
football player, Joe couldn't help but be a standout on the company soccer 
team. He was also active in extra curricular activities, being a member of the 
German Club, Trident Magazine Advertising Manager, and Battalion chair- 
man for the Reception Committee. 






203 






? 



-k 




LEONARD GEORGE RICHARD ANTON Shenandoah, Pennsyl 

Behind Len, when he came to the Academy, were a few well spent years in 
the Fleet. Plentj of hard work, ;i gi">d sins, i.t humor, and an int< nse inti rest 
in leading men brought him through \ VPS '" the Vcademy. rhe road was 
not alwa oni to travel, but if "as always the one which brought 

him closci t ■ » rlir realization of Ins ambitions \s able with one of Rust] 
Calli at tin keyboard of a piano, Len u.is .1 good man to 

have around. I with mediocrity, never willing to leave a job 

hall done, Len could always l>< counted on to do more than simpl) what was 
I of him. 



JOHN DUBELL APPLE. JR. 



/////. Pennsyl 



I ming from Saint l"s< ph's Prep in Philadelphia, Jack brought an enviable 
schol rd to the \cademy, and continued it here. However, academics 

by no me; pied all "I Ins tim< I lis other interests tool the form "I 

Stamp Club and Foreign Relations Club activities. Firm in his convictions 
lack spent n am an hour in spirited discussions with Ins classmates. Deeplj 
interested in all aspects "I Navj life, Jack thoroughly enjoyed cruises, and 
spent Ins summer leave undertaking submarine training in ordei to eval 
the merits of the Silent S< 1 



SPENCE MCFALL ARMSTRONG 



Columbia, Tennessee 




\ farmer from the fertile belt of middle I emussee. Mae spent a year at 
\ anderbilt University studying engineering and college life at the Sigma Chi 
house. At the Academy he coordinated an intramural program of soccer, foot- 
hall, and Softball with rhe ever present urgings of the Sub Squad. I le acquired 
the nickname of "Sam" from a classmate who gave no other reason for rhe 
moniker than that he looked like a guy that ought to be called "Sam." He 
would like best to lie remembered as the recording secretary of tin "Moon 
Lucas Fan Club" that claimed a lady bowler for an idol. Mac constantly pro- 
claimed that his choice of billets in the Navy was rhe Academy Dairy Farm 
where he would alwavs feel at home. 



UNITED STATES 



204 




r 




JAMES RICHARD ARNOLD 



Brooklyn, New York 



Before entering the Academy, Jim was employed on Wall Street. He 
attended Fordham University for a while, and spent a year in the Naval 
Reserve. Jim took all that the Academy had to offer in his stride, and breezed 
through academics with apparent ease. During his four year sojourn by the 
shores of the Severn, Pappy engaged in Battalion football, handball, water- 
polo, and company steeplechase and Softball. He also was an active member 
of the Newman Club and the Engineering Club. He utilized much of his time 
reading, engaging in amateur photography, and planning for the future. An 
individualist, Jim was known for his tenacity in clinging to facts as he saw 
them. 



STEVEN NIXON ARNOLD 



Los Angeles, California 



Steve may have left California to come to the banks of the Severn, but it is 
clear that the land of sunshine and flowers never left him. Approaching every- 
thing with the cool, casual, western manner, Steve invariably made a success 
of all he undertook — be it academics, athletics, or Tea Fights. Always a fast 
man with sweet words, he could be counted on to be at the hops. Gymnastics 
was his true love at Navy for he spent four years at hard work in McDonough 
Hall. That the work paid off, could easily be seen in his fine form on the side 
horse. His genuine friendliness and consideration will make Steve long re- 
membered by his friends. 



THOMAS ASHWORTH III 



Coronado, California 



Tommy was an exponent of the good weather of his home state, and a rabid 
supporter of Coronado High where he played football, basketball, and tennis. 
Athletic ability, good grades, and an even, friendly temperament were his 
strong points at the Academy. He received his appointment as the son of a 
deceased Naval officer, making the jump directly from high school to Annap- 
olis with no difficultv. Sports, with tennis in particular, were his main diver- 
sion, serving to* highlight his keen competitive spirit. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



205 










UNITED STATES 



GARLAND OTTIS AUDILET 



Yorktown, Texas 



i omingtoNavj after three years in the fleet, \mlii- arrived at the Vcadem) 
a 2 c \. I to join oui ranks .1 - .1 I'l. be. \udie could be recognized bj his bin 
1 1 \.is smile and the willingness to tackle anj i<>b. no matter li"« tough. 
W In- r her it u ;is selling Christmas cards or holding extra instruction for thosi 
ut us who found blinker hard to grasp, \udie was willing to help our. During 
the Crew season \udie \\ as always hard at work on the Severn pulling a port 
oai in one ol the top \a\\ shells. < >n Ins weekends he enjoyed spending a 
gn at deal ol his time with the < > \< '. \ gn at man to work with, and naturally 
modest about his accomplishments, \udie was a welcome man to have 
around. 




WILLIAM CHARLES AUER. JR. Minneapolis, Mini 

Hailing from rlu- land of the sk\ blue watt rs, Willie loved the outdoors and 
was alwa s read) to t .1 k . a hike, even if it was on the cobbled streets ol 
Annapolis, \ftei spending a yeai at the University of Minnesota, he joined 
a man's outfit, the Marines. \ \< ai and a half later, after months ol mam uv< is 
and dutj as a tank mechanic in the < iolden State, W illie found Pli I" summei 

no stiam Although he wasn't the studious type, Willie slipped » 1 1 gh 

academics at Navy with very little trouble. Being a confirmed Inlllulh al 
heart Ins greatest lov< ••••.is lying in the rack listening to that mountain 
music. In the afternoons he proved himsell might) handy with the epee ov< 1 
in Macdonough I [all. 



JOHN ROBERT BAALS 



/ - ... A ntucky 



ach," with a toothpick in Ins mouth and a bale ol cotton undei one arm 
toddled into I ecumseh Court in June ' ; 2. \ iewed Mother B. for the first time, 
and uttered the immortal words, "French Renaissance I know I'll love it 
here." He took up the Reg Hunk and slide rule after 2 1 ■, years at the Univer- 
sity of Cincinnati, where he had scoffed at the ROT( I I il lus major ac- 
complishments was boxing three rounds with Swede without being knocked 
nut. \ slash in math, skinny, ami steam, Just- left him as cold as did th< 
page Bull assignments right aftei noon meal. Sach often appeared shirtless 
ddn't sav 1111 to an\ one. 




206 






NAVAL ACADEMY 



ROBERT ALLEN BACHMAN Reinholds, Pennsylvania 

Bob came to the Naval Academy from the Naval Academy Preparatory 
School at Bainbridge, Maryland, after ten months service in the United States 
Navy. An ardent outdoorsman, his chief interests lay in the fields of hunting 
and fishing, where his experiences and knowledge of woodlore made him a real 
authority. While at the Academy Bob was a crew coxswain, dinghy sailor and 
was quite active in the German Club's many banquets. His Pennsylvania 
Dutch humor and unfailing ability to keep a lively conversation going, made 
him a good man to have around Bancroft Hall, especially when the going got 
rough. 




CHARLES CHAPLIN BAGGS Hampton, South Carolina 

Bidding farewell to that Carolina moon and donning his first pair of shoes, 
Charlie spent three years with the fleet before entering the Academy. His 
quiet efficiency and sense of duty soon gave Charlie the reputation of the 
right man for the job. In addition to fully mastering the daily routine, Charlie's 
ambition carried him on to long hours of Stage Gang work and sportswriting 
for the Log and Splinter. Habitually doing more than his share, Charlie played 
hard and well on many company sport teams. Always the first to enjoy a good 
time and the last to lose his good judgment, his days at the Academy were 
full ones indicative of many more to come. 



LAVON HENRY BAI R 



Idaho Falls, Idaho 



Von spent his early years in the wide open spaces of Idaho. Except for a short 
stay at Idaho State College, he never strayed from home until he joined the 
Navy. His two years of enlisted life were spent inside the continental limits, 
where he rose to Aviation Photographers Mate, 3/c. At Annapolis, he was 
often seen carrying a camera for the 1956 LUCKY BAG, a position he en- 
joyed most because it excused him from practice march-ons. Athletically, he 
shared his time with Sub Squad and company sports. Von enjoyed Academy 
life to the fullest, especially the extracurricular activities. 






207 






ROBERT EARL BAKER /> 

h w :is well on Ins waj to becoming .1 lawyer when he decided to altei Ins 
course and pursue tin- path "I an officer. Bob enjoys .1 good game ol tennis 
and has .1 deft hand foi playing bridge. His abilin i" express himsell l»>tli 
orally, and through composition has greatl) enhanced Ins academii standing 
in the class. Being a'membei "l thi Vrmj "t the Confedi rai y, and .1 pi rsonal 
friend of General Lee, Bob enjoys n miniscing on li"\\ the South won the Civil 
War. Bob's ever present Southern hospitality mil easilj gain foi him t In es- 
teem of all those who an fortunate enough t.. cnjoj Ins company. 



MAX MORRELL BALDWIN I'i /' ania 

Max cami Vcadem) from the I niversitj ■ •! Pennsylvania .1 facl 

he never allowed us to forget. His background ;ii Penn proved '"1" .> valuable 
• to Max, who was ;t man that had lirrli trouble with the academics. In 
rhc field iif athletics there w .is no problem foi Max either, for although he had 
never sailed before, Max was on the v - m foi the four years 

of his sr.iv here an I welcome aboard the yawls. Winn he \\ .isn't 

sailing, Max u:is one of the top men on the company steeplechase team and 
.I basketball player. Max's smile and capacity lor hard work made him 
.1 popular man. 




GLENN FRANCIS BALL 



1/ 1 h amme, Michigan 



Glenn found his way r<i Annapolis from Michigamme, when the) grow 'em 

short luit sturdy. He had an easy time adjusting to the life of a midshipman 
as he had previous military experience in the \ir Force, and a college hack- 
ground. Glenn, typical of most mids. enjoyed sporrs. leave, parries, and drag- 
ging. His drags most likely remember to this day. his pleasant disposition and 
breezy smile. Glenn had the habit of putting forth his maximum effort at all 
times, and that habit should serve him well when he realizes his ambition, and 
returns to the scene of his triumphs in the capacity of a Skinny Prof. 



UNITED STATES 








VICTOR JOHN BARICEV Biloxi, Mississippi 

Vic was always easy going, and benevolent to every person and thing he 
came in contact with. A true rebel, he spent a year at Marion Institute before 
coming here. Eating was one of his main pastimes, and it was a rare occasion 
to see him pass up food at any time. He was a tower of strength on the volley- 
ball team, and his passing was the downfall of many a football team, both in 
company competition and against the Plebes on those holiday games. Aloof to 
dragging, he preferred to remain a bachelor during most of his days at the 
Academy. 



JAMES NEWTON BARKER 



Spokane, Washington 



Jim came to the Academy from Gonzaga University by means of a Con- 
gressional appointment. From the very beginning of his four year stay on the 
banks of the Severn, Jim gained the reputation of being an excellent all-around 
athlete, but he confined his interest in varsity sports to football. He started 
as an end on the Plebe football team and continued on up the ladder to the 
varsity where his aggressiveness and drive were outstanding. In the intra- 
mural field, Jim was a standout pitcher for the company softball team, and 
an able batsman as well. 





ALLEN ELLSWO RTH BA RLOW 



Jacksonville, Florida 



In Al's military career, he has worn the uniform of every service except the 
army. Starting as a Marine Reservist, Al then went into the Air Force, and 
entered USNA via NAPS. Al was the legendary fellow who entered a class- 
room to keep the average down, while barely keeping his own safely up. Sub 
squad claimed him for two years, but he went on to bigger things by working 
as Associate Editor of the 1956 LUCKY BAG. To Al, only dragging or going 
to D.C. rated above the perpetual poker game. With Al's graduation, one 
wing of Mother Bancroft lost much of its philosophy and enterprise. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



209 








UNITED STATES 



HARRY FRANCIS BARNES Joiner, Arkansas 

From the cotton fields along tin- Mississippi came Harrj to partake in an 
officer's education within the walls of Navy Tech. Prior ro coming t<> the 
Academy, he had attended Vanderbilt Universit} for tu» years, there ths- 
playing Ins talents as a boxer. \t the Vcadem) he confined Ins activities to 
playing 150 pound Football. To him, the female sex was appealing, l>ur could 
never rake the place <>l his best loves hunting and western movies. Whethei 
it w as Christmas time or the "Dark ^ges," his talent as .1 comedian w .is evei 
present, and added much r<> his natural friendliness. Iln- halls of Mother 
Bancroft ;n< sun to miss Ham as he inters into Ins newly chosen career. 




HAROLD DUANE BARNHART 



Norfolk, Nebraska 



Haiin\ came to the \cademj from Norfolk, Nebraska, via a hitch in the 
fleet. I hinking that academics at the Vcademy weren't enough, he t'»>k up 
sail mi;, choir, foreign relations, and an active interest in the various engineer- 
ing clubs. ^ mi could usiialh find him doing an) one ol these things, and it not, 
he was out puTling in -points foi Nav) on the Varsitj Cross Countrj I cam. 
Barne) was serious when the situation warranted it. and yet it didn't take 
much to provoke his well known smile. His serious vein showed up right al 
with whatever he considered his duty, fhen just weren't enough hours in a 
daj foi Barne} to learn what he thought necessar) for a leader of men to know. 



HAROLD STEPHEN BAUDUIT 



- ■ • . \ ■ )'ork 



Boodit's greying hair spoke of man) experiences and man) .1 verbal clash. 
\ willing conversationalist on a wide rangi "I topics, hi was a formidabli 
opponent in an) argument. He donned the Nav) blue .it Newport, but soon 
obtained a transfer to the Naval \cadem) Preparator) School aftei acquiring 

ste for u"Kl braid. His seasonal tours with the Sub Squad pn v< nted 1 
sive varsit) spurts participation, but permitted tin- use of his height on the 
company volleyball team. Hal readily found an outlet for Ins speaking abilit) 
when those Bull periods rolled around. Perhaps the daily ten page letter 
helped account for the usual three hundred word epitome produced during the 
regular ten minute qui/. 



210 






NAVAL ACADEMY 



JOHN MORTON BAUMAN Kane, Pennsylvania 

From the home of the only "Lobo Wolves" in the world, John came to Navy 
Tech via the Naval Reserve and a D.C. prep school. He went all out for com- 
pany sports in the intra-brigade competition, but he hated the daily cruises to 
Hospital Point. As a result, he made it a point to play only one sport a year 
that required going over there. John was a strong point on the company 150 lb. 
touch football team and an excellent set man on the volleyball team. He also 
excelled, between seasons, as a member of the Radiator Squad. Whenever a 
practical joke was played on anyone, John was always right in the middle of 
it; but his innocent face always saved him from being accused. 




RONALD GERARD BEAGLE 



Covington, Kentucky 



Having been an outstanding athlete in high school and at Wyoming Semi- 
nary in Pennsylvania, Ron passed up numerous athletic scholarships to take 
a crack at Navy life. This quiet, easy-going Kentuckian had a quick and ready 
smile, and was always good for a chuckle, especially when the going got tough. 
Studies were no trouble to Ron, but he was famous for thinking up the most 
disconcerting questions to stump the profs. An "All American," "Lineman of 
the Year," and the fifth man in the opponent's backfield, Ron was really at 
home on the gridiron. He has quite an impressive record, but then; he is an 
impressive guy. 



JOHN ROBINSON BELLINGER 



Maple Heights, Ohio 



John came to the Academy directly from Maple Heights High School. While 
there he picked up a knowledge of football, and put it to good use for three 
years in high school. At Navy he continued with the game, playing four years 
of Battalion football, plus four years at his favorite sport, throwing the shot- 
put on the track team. He had always been interested in sports and spent much 
of his time expounding on the merits of the Browns and the Indians. "Bellows" 
always enjoyed the cruises, and came back with many a sea story to tell the 
Plebe generation. He had an affinity for falling in love on cruise, but come 
Ac year, the foreign lovelies were soon forgotten. 








211 









EDWARD INSLEY HUNT BENNETT. JR. . Pennsylvania 

W i called him " I l>> Hi ar," and :i \ irtual bear he was. in academics as well 
as athletics. During his four years staj .ir 1 SNA, red more than equalled the 
fine record that In- established .ir Mount Lebanon High School, in Pittsburgh, 
where he participated in football, track, and tennis. Other than his excellent 
.issi^ts in company fieldball, Battalion football .mil swimming, and on the 
Class Ring Committee, "The Bear" was noted tor his managi rial qualities on 
tin- Varsitj I acrosse field. His enthusiasm foi physical training could dail; I" 
evidenced by the incessant clink issuing from Ins room :is he worked oul al 
Ins favorite pastime, weight lifting. 



PETER CLARK BENNETT 



I'hiladflphia, I' inns 



bettet known ;is the Tiger, attended Noble and Greenough Prep 
Schools in Massachusetts before coming to tin \i ademj . ' Mo n the object ol 
practical jokes. Pete could usually induce onlookers to laugh with him insti ad 
of at him. He lists football, basketball and baseball :is Ins favorite spectatoi 
sports, and is an avid fan of his hometown teams. Peti might lie called a sort 
of traveling Chamber of Commerce for the (. it\ of Philadelphia. I le is a l< 
of tine clothes, flash) cars, and good liquors. In his free rime he could usually 
In- found playing basketball or working out with anyone who would wn stl< 
with him. 




THOMAS CLIFFORD BENSON 



Detroit, Michigan 



Tom, "L p-and-at-em" Benson, came ro the Academy from Northwestern 
Prep and the Naval Reserve. Many a "Dark Age" hour was pleasantly passed, 
listening ro the Benson treasury of unique but true experiences. Always active 
in company and Battalion sports, he excelled in soccer and water polo. Much 
free time was spent lending his gifred vocal chords to the Chapel Choir and 
Glee Club. A stern taskmaster with the Plehes. he was a constant source of 
information to these same Plebes, who found him to be as resourceful, intelli- 
gent and capable, as he was strict. The men associated with Tom, in his four 
years at the Academv. found him a real friend. 



UNITED STATES 



21. 





•-■: 



LEONARD FREDRICK BENZI 



Plai 



Pennsylvania 



Len joined us at the beginning of Youngster Year and immediately helped 
get us used to acting like upper class. Although famous for his lack of height, 
he was second to none when it came to outstanding varsity gridiron feats, and 
very few of us can remember when his nose was in one piece. An experienced 
master at having a great time with the minimum of facilities, his ability to 
always find fun was universally recognized. Sleep, and thoughts of queens 
usually occupied his few spare hours. Len was a fine competitor and will always 
have a ready smile for one and all. 



ROBERT FRED BERG 



Amarillo, Texa 



Hailing from the Lone Star State, Bob journeyed 2000 miles to join the 
Brigade in June of '52. Plebe summer found him taking to the Navy shells in 
an effort to make the crew team, for he was to spend many days, literally, on 
the Severn. Soccer vied with crew for his afternoon time, as he was always 
needed on the team. Sports, however, did not keep Bob from constantly 
teaching plebes the merits of Texas. Frequent trips to the Steerage, and letters 
to the girl were other favorite activities. But whatever Bob did, he did with a 
smile and an encouraging word. 





LAWRENCE Wl LTON BERG ER 



Hamilton, Ohio 



After a year at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Larry decided to bring his 
keen mind and jovial nature to USNAY. Coming from the Buckeye State, he 
was an avid rooter of State's top-rate football team, and a walking encyclo- 
pedia on all sports. To prove it, he could show you a set of matched golf clubs 
he won in a nationwide sports contest. His ambitions include being a stovepipe 
jockey, and the fact that he gets a glassy, far off look in his eyes whenever a 
jet zips over, shows he has flying in his blood. Happy snap rolls, Larry! 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



213 














N^- 



UNITED STATES 



ROGER SHERMAN BETTS 



Pensacola, Florida 



Probably the first words Rog ever uttered were, "Mama, when can I ^> to 
\nnapolis?" \ltcr recovering from rlu- shock of having to spend 18 years in 
the civilian corps, he endeavored to make the most of it. A staunch Navy 
Junior of the old school, he spent time in ever} part of the states plus Guam 
and London, and served a hitch in ;t Naval Air reser\ e squadron before coming 
to \.c\\. When not swimming backstroke in the Natatorium, he could In- 
found in the First \\ 1 1 1 ji basement pouring over cop) foi "Oui Little Vlaga- 
zine," the Sl'l.l NTER, of « hich he became head man. Nevi i one to sweat the 
academics, Rog managed, in between bridge hands, to hold up Ins ind ol ;i 
hull session in commendable fashion. 




DUANE UBBE BEVING 



Ackley, /■ va 



Born and i .used on Ins fathei 's farm neai Vckley, Iowa, Ubbe's tu si twent) 
years were devoted to the soil. During Ins second yeai .it Iowa .Mate College, 
where he was studying agricultural engineering, Ubbe decided o> put in a 
hitch with the regula'rs of Uncle Sam's \a\ j Being selected honor man of his 
companj in boot camp proved Ins strong desire to succeed, and Ins abilit) to 
do any job well. I In s, traits soon led 1 bbe to the "Home of F uture Admirals" 
where neither Plebe year noi academics off) red him much trouble. Keeping a 
starring average was routine, and I bbe could always l>< counted on to explain 
a difficult problem 01 lesson. His athletic abilit) was well proven on a varii I 
ol company sports squads. 

WILLIAM WALTER BIGLER Washington, Pennsylvania 

Walls is a Pennsylvania hoy and real proud ol it, too During Ins st.r. at 
Vc\\. he played a great man) different sports, but Ins favorite was football, 
cspccialh the 150 lb. brand. \ quarterback on the "Mighty Mires," he also 
played for his company touch team. Coming to Navy straight our of high 
school, he was one ol the youngest members of Ins class. \ little college work 
would have helped with the books, especially in his favorite subject, Russian. 
but he not through the pitfalls w ithout too much trouble, and emerged a grand 
uu\. whose pals will never forcer him. 





214 





NAVAL ACADEMY 



GEORGE EMERY BILES 

George came to the Trade School from Fort Riley, although he often claimed 
a number of spots throughout the country as his home. The son of an Army 
Colonel, he was never fazed by the thousands of times he was asked why he 
came to Navy. George, having finished high school in Kansas, received his 
pre-Academy training at Braden Prep in Cornwall-on-Hudson, New York. 
Since academics bothered him little, he had plenty of time to sleep and enjoy 
his membership in the Radiator Squad. But George was a hard worker who 
expected others to keep pace, as many a plebe could verify. 




JACK ROBERT BINNS 



Spokane, Washington 



Big Jack's entrance into the Academy fulfilled a lifelong ambition — beating 
the draft — and proved that no task is too great for a Spokane Indian. After a 
rather uneventful Plebe year. Jocko proceeded to establish enviable records in 
regard to One-Fifty-Football, Town Hall socials, and outrunning messengers. 
Jack's extracurricular activities also included a three year sojourn on the 
Varsity Sub Squad. His three biggest loves are sour-mash bourbon, rich 
women, and ships with gedunks, in that order. Whenever we think of Jocko 
we will think of his motto, "Never let studies interfere with your education." 



RALPH GORDON BIRD 



Dearborn, Michigan 



Ralph came to the Academy from the University of Michigan, where he had 
been enrolled in the NROTC program. A true outdoors sportsman, he spent a 
great portion of his leaves in the woods of Northern Michigan, either hunting 
or wading the trout streams. His hunting experience accounts for the fact that 
he was a very fine shot, and consistently one of the top competitors of the 
Rifle Team. A conscientious worker and a good friend to all, as well as an excel- 
lent student. Ralph was truly a credit to his class. 





~ 



/V ; ^** 



^ 



215 






GREGORY JOEL BITTNER 



Cheyenne, Wyoming 



Have you evei mei .1 person who knew whal you were going to sa\ before 
you said h : Well, that's Greg! Besides being well versed in the an "I psy- 
chology, (.ml: is gifted with an above average athletic ability; while at the 
\i.iil<m\ he specialized in golt and tennis not to mention companj football 
and steeplechase. Before entering the Academy, Greg lived in Japan foi two 
years where he was a member ol the Fai Eastern Command championship 
basketball team. Leaving basketball behind, he took up a strange, new, las- 
cinating game with the Steam Department. But ;is you can sec he won out. 



JAMES LAWRENCE BLACK 



SwampSCOlt, Massachusetts 



\ Connecticut Yankee transplanted to the thriving metropolis ol Swamp- 
scott, I" came to tin- Academj after attending Bullis Prep. He combined the 
lite ol a Mul with art, in w huh In- is verj proficient I" established .1 reputation 
throughout the Brigade with Ins football posters which often decorated the 
Rotunda, and with his valuable contribution <>t talent to the Brigade Activi- 
ties Committee. I lis ability <>n tin- piano livened many company parries, and 
his booming serve and deadly hunk shot made him an asset to the renins and 
basketball reams. Since Jo also enjoyed singing, he spent four years in the 
bass section ol the Antiphonal Choir. 




WILLIAM HARLAND BLACK Columbus, Wisconsin 

Bill came ro the Naval Academy after spending a year at tin University of 
Wisconsin. Being one of those fortunate people who always seemed to have 
plenty ot time to spend on things orher than academics, he managed to utilize 
many ot his talents while a midshipman. Besides designing, drawing, and 
building a fourteen cylinder engine as a member of the Mechanical Engineering 
Club, he mustered with the Drum and Bugle Corps for four years and played 
in the Midshipmen's Concert Band. For athletics. Bill spent most of his fall 
seasons knocking over ten pins for the First Battalion, his winters managing 
the \ arsiry Rifle I cam. and his springs putting the shot for Batt track. 



UNITED STATES 



!16 





JAMES WILLIAMS BLANCHARD. JR 



Coronado, California 



Doc is a Navy Junior, and so he has come to call many places home. Doc 
was born in Colon, Panama, and since has lived in Hawaii, California, Con- 
necticut, and other places associated with the Navy. After graduating from 
high school, he continued his schooling at the University of Hawaii, transfer- 
ring after one year to the University of Virginia. While at the Academy Doc 
played Plebe basketball and lacrosse, finishing his last three years as a member 
of the Varsity Lacrosse team. Doc was very active as a member of the brigade, 
establishing an enviable record while at USNA. 



EMIL NATHANIEL BLOCK, JR 



Neivark, Ohio 



It took a convincing talk by a Lieutenant Commander to implant the vision 
of USNA in Emil's mind, but once that vision was there, fleet examinations, 
NAPS and Baltimore liberty came in that order following five years in the 
Fleet. Plebe year and basketball. Youngster year and the weight loft in Mc- 
Donough Hall, second class year and dragging, ranked on top as successive 
Dark Ages passed by. A ready grin and a distinctive laugh marked a per- 
sonality that made Emil many friends both in the Hall and among the mem- 
bers of the opposite sex, and kept him with a full set of phone numbers. Unlike 
Napoleon, Emil Block has yet to find his Waterloo. 





FRANK LOUIS BOEBERT, JR 



Astoria, Oregoi 



Boe, who spent a year as a commercial fisherman before coming to the Naval 
Academv, does well in any sport. He has led his company in every swimming 
test, and is outstanding on the soccer field. In academics he never had much 
trouble, and the determination he showed, promise him an interesting career. 
A lover of Mambo and Classics, Boe is a good man at any party. Before head- 
ing Kast, he was in the Submarine Reserve and worked in electronics. His 
pleasing personality and tales of the West Coast have lightened many days 
for his classmates. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



217 








*= tic, iirufy s 

2^r 



UNITED STATES 



ARTHUR CRANWELL BOENSCH 



Mi. Pleasant, South Carolina 



( > 1 1 r of South Carolina, via Bullis Prep, Cranny emu- in tin- Naval Academy. 
Finding Ins size no obstacle, Crannj found himself playing Hist string Plebe 
I i otball; however, a knee injury ;ir the onset of Youngster year caused his 
dreams of future heroics on tin- gridiron to In- losi forever. I he remainder "I 
his m.iis .it I S\ \ were consumed with tennis, s.nlin^. academics now and 
tin- n. and frequent letters to his OAO Cranny's abilit) to make friends \\ ill 
be an attribute < asilj recognized bj tlmsi who are i" serve with him. 




PETER BLAKE BOOTH San Diego, California 

\ Navy Junior, Pete fitted into lifi at Goal I ech with the practiced i .is* ol 
one born into the Navy. I lis onlj regret in life u.is thai he wasn't born with 
wings so he could spend ;ill Ins turn- flying. \lt< i flying, his majoi interests 
were squash and sailing, although an) afternoon might find him in the ^\m 
getting 01 staying in shape. \ fierce competitor, he nevei took anything l\ mu 
down, and .is .1 result nevei lacked foi success. \..i much foi "Kultchur," 
but lime on genuine warmth of feeling and innate humor, he weni a lon^ waj 
with tin- effective use In- made "t Ins natural talents. 



STANLEY LEWIS BOOTH Santa liarbara. California 

in came u, Annapolis from the sunn) state nt California via the Fleet. 
Because he was fond "t afternoons <>n the squash coiirrs. listening to l).i\< 
Brubeck's jazz records, atching lorry winks, he disliked academic 

assignments winch inter! tan v.. is an active membei "t the N VI 11 foi 

whom he played tin- kiss fur four years. Passing Ins room, \<>u might havi 
heard one "I rlu- frequent, friend!) debates he had with Ins roommate Irom 
Florida as to which state had rlu- better sunshine. Sincerity and spirit will 
surely continue to place Stan high in rlu- estimates of his associati s 




218 





NAVAL ACADEMY J 



CLIFFORD ANDREW BORDEN 




Bethesda, Maryland 



Four years ago, Cliff exchanged a set of bell bottoms and an ET 3 rate for a 
Jacob Reed special (sans stripes). His crystal set and Tennessee Ernie helped 
him to while away Plebe Year without too much difficulty. Thompson Stadi- 
um's cinder path and McDonough's ropes were Cliff's usual haunts during 
athletic periods. His proficiency as a swimmer cannot be overlooked either. 
Following in true ET fashion, he spent many hours on the line at Radio 
Navy, WRNV. Someday he hopes to have his own T V station (3-D and color, 
of course). Cliff leaves USNA as he entered, ever good natured and with 
many friends. 




BERNARD WILLIAM BOSHOVEN 



Grand Rapids, Michigan 



Bosh, one of Michigan's native sons, left his fishing rod and rifle at home 
when he came East, but he never forgot the outdoor life. The change in the 
seasons always brought forth a desire to hunt geese or deer. This same liking 
for the out-of-doors prompted him to frequent the bus to the golf course on 
Saturday afternoons. Somehow finding time between the academics, Bosh 
applied himself to model shipbuilding, and his friends could watch the progress 
on his near perfect replica of the "Constitution." That genial grin, and willing- 
ness for a good argument made him welcome in any bull session. 



JOHN LEWIS BOSSERT 



Lewistown, Pennsylvania 



Jack came to Navy Tech from Lewistown via Bullis Prep School. An out- 
standing wrestler in high school. Jack wrestled in the 137 lb. class at USNA 
Plebe year, and was a member of the Varsity Wrestling squad for three years. 
A tendency to sink like a stone when immersed in water, made the "Rock" 
an old pro on the swimming club. As a member of the Circulation Department 
of the Log and Splinter, he helped the magazines to win many a new friend. 
His quiet, steadying influence was a strong force in his company, and he was 
always willing to drop whatever he was doing and give a helping hand. 




219 






ROGER ELDEN BOX Houghton Lake, Michigan 

R < >u discarded his duck-cut and pegged pants and entered the \.i\.il 
\cademj \ ia Castle I [eights Militai j Academy, Lebanon, Tenn. \K\ aj s a fast 
man with a paddle, Rog spent man) an afternoon at Hubbard Hall stealing 
pure lanolin to aid m Ins inmate's efforts to restore hair. ' Occasionally un- 
able r<> find a fourth tor bridge, Rog could In- found studying. During second 
class .i.ii. even though he had finalk mastered tin- slide rule, he was still 
unable to calculate the vast numbei "I formei flames who had marched to the 
a It. 1 1 without him. \ connoisseur ol fine liquor, In- could l>> counted upon to 
provide a bottle ol "Man-O-Man" Manachivits for any party. 

JOHN STANLEY BOYD New York, \ York 

After i"" years at College and sixteen months in tin fleet, [ohn sit his 
i tin Naval Academy. Plebe year found him manager of the Plebe 
Basketball ream ami a mainstay mi tin- companj basketball and volleyball 
teams. V g i entertainer, In- took a large parr in tin company parties 
ami happy hours. An avid music lover, his favorites wen- popular, hilllnlK. 
anil show rums. Likeable, enthusiastic, and cheerful, John was always r< ad] 
with a clever song or story. Liberty, beautiful girls, and parties especially 
appealed to him. With the world around him never posing too much of a 
problem, John always managed to make life run at a smooth tempo. 




PAUL HART BRADTMILLER 



Chicago, Illinois 



Paul came to \nnapohs from Chicago and spent all lour years trying to 
become accustomed to rhe change. After a year ar Northwestern University 
in the Air Force RO I C. he decided instead, in favor of rhe Naval Academj 
as the foundation for his career. I he Academic Department stood to him as a 
challenge which he more than met. standing very high in the class year after 
year. Besides excelling in academics, he became well known as a runner in 
Battalion and company sports, always striving for first place and generally 
winning ir. Paul's continuing search for personal perfection has served as a 
firm basis for his humor and friendship throughout the years. 



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220 





PHILLIP CARL BRAINERD 



Norfolk, Virginia 



From Oklahoma University Phil came to the Academy to be identified at 
his approach by the sounds of heavy heels scraping across the deck. With a 
distant gleam in his eyes, a pleasant smile, and a positive personality, Phil 
seemed to be able to break the spell of any four N day. Through four years 
he proved a superior credit to the sport of wrestling, and to those for whom 
he fought. While drags interested him frequently, Phil never conquered his joy 
at being chosen as one of the "Cover Boys" for "Seventeen" magazine. 



THOMAS CHARLES BRANDT 



Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



Tom, better known as T.C., spent a year at the University of Pennsylvania, 
majoring in civil engineering before answering the call, and coming to Navy 
via a Congressional appointment. A real bridge fiend and letter-writer, T.C. 
spent as much time as possible pursuing these activities when he wasn't play- 
ing Varsity Soccer. Not exactly a facile swimmer, T.C. devoted many after- 
noons to the sub squad, and even claimed the dubious honor of being the 
senior member. A star man and a conscientious worker, Tom proved that 
even the toughest obstacles could be licked by fierce determination. 





RICHARD GANTERT BRAUN 



Rochester, New York 



After living many years in a completely Army family, Dick decided to 
choose the Navv. He graduated from Brighton High School in Rochester's 
suburbs and attended Hilder Prep School before entering the Academy. He 
spent most of his time here on the soccer field where, playing at both halfback 
and fullback, he was a major asset to the Varsity Soccer Team. Dick's loves 
were his harmonica, which he was continually playing in the shower, and 
semi-classical music. Whenever bull sessions arose, Dick could always be 
found on hand to add his opinion and a little humor to the conversation. His 
keen sense of humor and his distinctive brand of laughter make him welcome 
company at any hour. 



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VICENTE JOSUE BRILLANTES 



Manila, Philippines 






Vicente, better known as Vic by his Friends and classmates, came to the 
\.iv:il Academy from tin- Philippines. IK- was a student at the Mapua Insti- 
tute oi rechnology in Manila in Ins third year of Civil Engineering when he 
decided to finish Ins education and training ar USN \. Vic was strongly inter- 
i sted in extracurricular activities, belonging t<> rlu- Catholic Choir, participat- 
ing in Battalion and Brigade Boxing, and of course, being a "whiz kid" in 
mathematics, a staunch member of the Math (.'Ink Good natured, he lias 
pat up with many a rib about Ins slight accent. Vic brought r<> us all a greater 
understanding, and profound respect for his country. 




CHARLES JACOB BROCKWAY. JR. 



. .-Ilabama 



I ). i you recognize the drawl : It belongs to none other than our dependable, 
mudcsi and easy-going friend, "Hoss." He joined rlu- ranks aftei a year ol 
prepping at Marion Institute, nevei realizing how much he was to miss thai 
ever-!oving Ham a sunshine. I hat cold Yankee winter and Espanol would sum 
tip his pel peeves, but at hast the lattei passed in two years. Mis fencing 
ability made him an easy winner on the Plebe Squad, and during the warmi i 
months, when he wasn't banging out home runs, he was tossing a football 
id. Hoss was equally proficient in the classroom, being especially adept 
m engineering coursi s 



JAMES CLARK BROKAW 



Scituate, Massach usetti 



"31ack Broke" was the guy who really went for the military life. Being an 
larine, he plans to go right hack into the (nips, 'though he was almost 
ed In the "sock bag blue." Flying is his dream, but it has to be done in 
Marine Green. \ squared away mid, Broke did Ins best to militarize the 
Plebes and maintain Academy discipline and tradition. On the athletic fields 
he was no Marinas, but t<>r "blood and guts" performance, he was your man. 
\s for being famous, he's noted for Ins bitter humor, his cigars, and his adven- 
tures with the opposite sex. 



1 '3ft 



m 








NAVAL ACADEMY 



DONALD LOUIS BROWN 




Fort Scott, Kc 



Seeking a more adventurous life, Don set down his beer mug, cast away 
college fraternity life, and said hello to Sing Sing on the Severn. (The college 
was Baker University and the frat was Kappa Sigma.) Besides being a lover 
of music and sports, Don spent most of his spare time reading, pasting away 
in his scrapbook, or simply playing pool down in Smoke Hall. While at the 
Academy Don held his sports activity down to the intramural level, spending 
most of his time on the Hospital Point soccer fields. He was always just the 
guy to date your drag's special friend because he had a way with the "wimmin". 




NICHOLAS BROWN 



idence, Rhode Island 



Harvard's loss was Navy's gain when Nick decided that his great interest 
for the sea must become his profession. His fine linguistic ability added much 
to the Russian and French Club banquets, and earned him first place for the 
Foreign Language course. His past experience and avid participation placed 
him at the top of the Sailing Club. A third of many facets can be found in his 
administrative talent, to which the Class Ring Dance Committee turned, as 
a key addition to its staff. Add to this a keen insight in human nature, a pro- 
found sensibility in all the arts, and a sharp but well-directed tongue and you 
have a slight indication of the combination that shall bear him to new heights. 



ROBERT HAMILTON BROWN, I II 



Tallahassee, Florida 



When "Mickey" arrived at USNA from Florida State University and the 
southern sun, he expected to devise an escape mechanism for Plebe year. His 
independence was temporarily shattered when the smoke cleared, and he be- 
came a conscientious midshipman. He retained his fondness for hillbilly 
music, and recorded the times with his camera. He played several company 
sports, was a frustrated tennis player, and found his strongbox a haven for 
more than currency. Mickey's favorite character was his father and he was 
always a staunch advocate of the hallowed adage, "Illegitimus Non Car- 
borundum.'' 





223 






ROBERT JOSEPH BROWN. JR 



I ■ .... / 



Bob, .1 typical Links [*exan, called \bilene Ins home town. I '<■ j^ i:itl tj ;t rt-ti 
from \bilene High School with ;i scholarship to Rice Institute, bul decided to 
n\ his luck ar Navy instead. His favorite pastime was eating, l>nr dragging 
ran .1 close second. If.uk. softball, and squash rated highest on his list of 
sports. Mis method of relaxation was to exercise with ;i set "f weights, and 
have .1 good work '>ut. He always said that aftei lifting weights he was so 
tired that he msr collapsed into the rack. I ic .1 > u;is best known for his sell 
I manner, commanding voice, and quick smile. 

ROBERT SAMUEL BROWN. JR. 

// ■ .■ II . Ha ri . Pennsylvania 

Bob, a Marine Corps junior, spent much "I his nine traveling throughout 
the world before settling down in Pennsylvania. After a year "I prep school 
in D.C., H<>h came to Navj l"ech where a Firstie promptly tagged him with 
rlu- nickname ol "Charley Brown," in honor of the famed comic srrip char- 
acter: a name destined to cling r<> Huh for life. Charlie Brown and academics 
didn't always get along as hesr the\ might; hut studies never gor him down, 
and Charlie always managed to hold his own. An ardent sailing Ian. he spent 
much of his time on the schooner "Freedom." \ winning personality and 
witty sense ol humor were great personal assets, winning Hob mam friends. 



- .^-o-X^ 




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GEORGE DAVID BROYLES 



Millers port, Ohio 



"I He Dave" comes to the Brigade from Millersport 'pop. 486) in the heart 
ol < Ihio. He got the idea of USXA when he was on an all-expense paid trip to 
W ashington and area tor being a stare winner in an American Legion contest. 
Alter high school graduation in 1951 he joined the U.S. Navy and entered the 
Academy through NAPS in 1952. He is (pure an agile lad in sports and his 
extra-curricular activities . . . ad-infinitum. He was top baritone in the 
Chapel Choir and the glee club and played a cool baritone sax in the concert 
band. He has a sharp eye for beauty, and loves to see a girl with long flowing 
rresses. 



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224 





JAMES WILLIAM BRUNNER 



Mikvaukee, Wisconsin 



Jim, a product of the beloved beer city, came to us by way of a Fleet 
Appointment and the Naval Prep School where he was an ardent sports 
participant. After his arrival in Crabtown, he became active in the Public 
Relations Club and the Christmas Card Committee, in addition to swinging 
a mean bat on the Varsity Nine. Whenever bull sessions were in progress, Jim 
was always ready, willing and able to add his sentiments; and could usually 
be found in the room with the largest crowd. He found great pleasure in hav- 
ing a good time with members of all classes, and could always be counted on 
for good company. 



JAMES WILLIS BRUSO 



Snyder, New York 



The trail to the Naval Academy was a winding one for Jim, as it led him 
through a post graduate year at Amherst High and then to Hilder Preparatory 
School before depositing him at Navy. We could all take lessons from Jim on 
the art of studying for exams — an ability that paid off more than once in his 
four vears here. Jim was an outstanding Battalion swimmer, and when not 
studying, he could usually be found in the Natatorium. He could also be 
found frequently in the phone booth, talking to his 0A0. Jim's sincerity and 
personality, which made him so many friends here, will serve him well wher- 
ever he goes. 





THOMAS EDGAR BRUYERE 



Longview, Texas 



The Navigation Department tried, but never convinced Tom that Polaris 
wasn't directly over Houston, and that the Southern Cross couldn't be seen 
straight up from Dallas. Having been a varsity letter man at Longview High, 
"Terrible Tom, the ticklish tackle" put forth for his company in volleyball, 
and basketball. He was the most famous for his three line solo in the Musical 
Club Show. Being a humorist at heart, he could always see the lighter side of 
life, and spent his four years at Navy with the philosophy that there is always 
room in the world for a man with a sense of humor. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



225 








UNITED STATES 



RICHARDGUYBRYANT / o, Arizona 

Dick came to the Naval Academy from the University of Arizona where he 
was pursuing a course in Mining Engineering. After one year at college, he 
decided to sir Ins sights on a commission, ["he system never bothered him 
much and the sami goes l"i tin academics, which always seemed to come 
pretty easily. I lis main sport was Battalion football, although he was acme 
in a number "I rlu- othei intramural sports. Dick was famous tor his ability 
to fix other people up with blind dates, although a couple of them were so 
blind they evidently couldn't rind rlu Vcademy. Mis easj going manner com- 
bined with ;i persistent desire ro finish whai he started, made Dick a man \m-11 
liked ;it rlu \cadem\ . 




? 



I 






CHARLES ALLEN BUCHANAN. JR. Washington, D. C. 

Following in the footsteps of Ins forefathers, Buck came to rlu- Academy 
from I .union Prep school. His inclination towards being an individualist pro- 
duced man) escapades that will long be remembered. Dividing Ins extra- 
curricular time between lacrosse and soccer, Buck could always be found 
giving ir his "max" whether it was against the Indonesian All Stars 01 \mn. 
Buck's conquest of the academics was somewhat harder than that ol the fair 
sex, but he came through because he kept at them until he had the range, 
Mways read) foi a pain. Buck will make himself quite a hit wherevei hi 
'. ith his <iiiu'k wu and winning smile. 



JESSE WALTER BUCKELEW 



Palm Springs, California 



\ man without a Congressman, Buck came to I SN \ through the courtes) 
of the Hi el il years of college on the West Coast helped him when it 

came to academics, and were often described with glowing enthusiasm. A 
pitcher with stuff on the ball, Buck helped man) of the hatters he tared on the 
Softball diamond, lower their batting averages. Me also I a last game of 

squash, followed by a short nap. Weekends and leave were Ins happiest mo- 
ments, and were always too short. \ happy-go-lucky mid, Muck never won ied 
about anything except the coming weekend, and the big plans he had be< n 
formulating all week. 



^^KT^ 





NAVAL ACADEMY 



JOHN EDWIN BUCKLEY 




Los Altos, California 



Being a Navy Junior, Buck's answer to, "Where are you from, mister?", 
ranged anywhere from Hawaii to Florida. He came to us via the Naval Air 
Reserve, where he spent three years acquiring all his knowledge about the 
flying machine. Once here, he tortured us with his musical talents, when he 
found the time after a full afternoon on the diamond, volleyball court, or with 
the saber. On those rare weekends when John wasn't dragging, his books and 
rack consumed most of his time. "Where there's a will, there's a way," typified 
John. With the driving determination, and knowledge of people which he has 
mastered, no hurdle can possibly stand in his way. 



JAMES WILLIAM BUDDLE Dover, New Jersey 

After spending a year at the University of Pennsylvania, Jim tired of gay 
college life and answered the call of the Naval Academy- Although he had 
hung up his running spikes before his appearance here, Jim occasionally came 
out of retirement. Academics left Jim with nary a gray hair. Being a frustrated 
Picasso, he managed to divert himself during ofF hours by turning out dubious 
masterpieces. Jim's other interests included the activities of the Russian Club 
and the Aeronautical Engineering Club. He also spent many hours reading 



books on various and unrelated subjects. 



WILLIAM CLARK BULLIS Rockville, Maryland 

Clark was born in Washington, D.C. but claims Maryland as his home state, 
as he lives there at present. He is right at home in the service, as there is 
nothing that he likes better than travelling, and associating with firearms. 
Coming to the Academy was no surprise to Clark, for his father was also a 
graduate. For some unknown reason, he attended Bulbs School where he 
played football and excelled in Bull courses. Perhaps that explains why he was 
such an avid member of the Foreign Relations Club. The extent of good na- 
tured Clark's worries was deciding which of his prettv female friends he would 
drag during the coming weekend. 






227 






HOWARD FREDRICK BURDICK. JR. 



Westerly, Rhode Island 



* 



Up "ii the coast ol Rhode Island the) raise sailors, so it was natural that 
Howie faun- r<> Navy lech. Between broken-toe and sprained-ankle time, 
Mown- managed to clock a lot ol minutes on the Navj l !ross-Countr\ team, a 
fact rhar gave him a decided advantage in the "thing squadron." Plebe yeai 
and "come arounds, ' youngstei yeai and cigars, an 1 second class year and tin- 
old Faithful slide rule, won the majority ol his attention during the succession 
of Canoe U. weeks until graduation came rolling around. Between purls ol 
those occasional cigars, sarcasm and ili\ wit Rowed, flavored with a New 
England twang and Yankee determination to succeed. 

MILTON EDWARD BURDSALL Bridgeton, New Jersey 

\\ est Point was the loser, when Milt gave tin Navy his noil and decided to 

attend the Academy. Fresh from the sands of South Jersey and Bradens Prep, 
he became well known during Plebe year lor Ins talented "Shuffling OH lo 
Buffalo." Not confining Ins dancing ahihtv to the Messhall, he coached the 
dance team in the musical club show. Com pan) soccer also rook up much ol 
his time. Milt's abilit) t<> temper his \ur and sense ot humor with good solid 
judgement made him a popular liberty partner, lie considered his rirsr week- 
end ar Virginia Beach during Second Class summer his best. He and several 
of his classmates really had the town jumping. 




NORMAN ALLAN BURGK 



Oakland, California 



Norm arrived ar the Academy with one semester at the University ol Cali- 
fornia and eighteen months in the Navy hehmd him. I his experience made 
him no stranger to the rigors of life ar Navy lech. Plebe year, academics 
caused their nervous moments tor Norm, but his inreresr in crew, and much 
hard work took him on to the glories of upperclass life. He proved to he very 
proficient in the academic departments, and his participation in company 
sports took up many an afternoon. He had many stories to rell of his travels 
during his leaves. Norm was always well liked and ready to give his help to 
those who were struggling 



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EDMUND BURKE. Ill 



Bozeman, Montana 



Eddie lived quite a few places, but that easy-going Western manner never 
rubbed off. Having many varied interests, he was active in the Automotive 
Engineering Club, Judo Club, and found time to work for the Lucky Bag. Ed 
enjoyed an evening workout and could usually be found practicing judo, 
punching the bag, or lifting weights. Although he usually tried to avoid the 
subject, he had some eventful times small boat sailing. With a great liking 
for travel and meeting new people, Ed will be right at home in the service. A 
quick smile, subtle sense of humor, and that easy-going manner characterized 
the genuine friendliness that Ed showed to all who knew him. 



M ATTISON ANDREW BURT 



Shamokin, Pennsylvanic 



Upon completing his apprenticeship at Severn School, Matt began the rigor 
of Plebe year, following close in his brother's footsteps. The academics seemed 
not to hold him back, and he found ample time to develop himself as a top- 
notch Varsity Lacrosse player, as well as to participate in numerous other 
activities. His palate seemed satisfied by football games, dining out, weekend 
movies, or an occasional hop. Among his dislikes were the long waits between 
leaves, and the unruly rush to the last bus after away games. Matt's person- 
ality, perseverance, dexterity, and comic-strip humor cannot be soon forgotten 
by any of us. 





RUSSELL HENRY BURT 



Springfield, Massachusetts 



Russ was generally known to his classmates as a quiet and ambitious chap, 
who refused to waste time or words. A proof of his manner of getting the right 
answer, is his academic standing. Always anxious to help a perplexed class- 
mate, he could be counted on to spare a few minutes from his studies. Soccer 
held a large interest in Russ's life at the Academy, and, although he never 
made top billing on the Varsity Soccer squad, he developed a keen interest in 
the game. Possessing a quiet sense of humor, Russ was one who could take a 
joke. If you attempted to argue a point with him, you generally ended up 
questioning your own argument. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



229 











UNITED STATES 



VERNON ROYCE BUSH 



Spencerport, A eu ) ork 



\ i in is a true 1 ankee, hailing from the bleak wintry climate of upstate 
New , > nrk. Upon graduation from high school, he cast his lot with rlu- Navy, 
and soon \\ as living rlu- plusli life of a Sonarman. Seeing more to the Navy 
than «as visible from a sonarscope, he entered the Naval Academy via NAPS. 
When not struggling with academics, Vern kept advertising books for the 
LOG. Leisure hums found the ex-"Ping Jockey" in rlu- rack. However, much 
cil Ins rum- was devoted to having Plebes memorize pertinent facts about the 
Marine Corps. Mthough Ins first love is the St. Lawrence River, his enforced 
detachment from it has brought about a fascination l<>r seeing more i>l the 
world. 




WHITMORE SPENCER BUTTS. JR 



ola, Florida 



In "Ship's" opinion, he had th<- misfortune of being born in California, but 
In- soon moved to Florida, which he now calls home regardless of where tin- 
's. iw sends his father. Slug could be found leading the compan) football and 
Softball teams and in between, dreaming ol lost treasures and tish to be caught 
in the ( lull ill Mexico. < In weekends Shin spent Ins time looking for that certain 
someone or listening to Dixieland jazz. I lis eas) cunt; manner and good 
humor, coupled with Ins old saying, "Everything comes to those who can 
wait" are Ins inseparable characteristics. 



WESTON HAMILTON BYNG 



Washington, D.C 



\ Navj junior who has lived in man) places both North and South of the 
vlason-Dixon line, Ham remained a confirmed Yankee. During Ins four years 
ar rlu- Academy, he was an active athlete, putting Ins versatility to good use 
on intramural sports squads. Mthough h<- never had any serious conflicts 
with rlu- academic departments, I lam admitted that he wouldn't make a 
verj good electrician. His favorite pastimes, when not engaged in athletics, 
were enjoying music and his rack, \lways even-tempered and quiet, Ham 
never got excited except when he was occasionally crossed by an unsuspect- 
ing Plebe. 





230 




NAVAL ACADEMY | 



JOHN MERRITT CALDWELL 




Austin, Texas 



Like most Texans, John was well over six feet tall. After one year at the 
University of Texas, he decided to join the Navy and see the world. Two years 
of enlisted duty, including a tour at NAPS, and John was on his way to the 
Wardroom. He spent most of his sports time here playing company football, 
basketball, and volleyball. Sundays found him viewing the pulpit from the 
rear as a member of the Chapel Choir. Unlike most of us, John could lie down 
and study without going to sleep and was surprisingly efficient studying this 
way. Diligence and conscientiousness mark him well. 




JAMES ROWLAND CANNON Bridgeville, Delaware 

Boom, prodigal son of Bridgeville, saw the light when he got his first pair 
of shoes and made his trek to the Severn. A follower of the "Five Year Plan," 
Boom said "two plebe years never hurt anybody." As an ex-white hat, he was 
well known for the liberties he pulled at NAPS, and for his tour at boot camp. 
Some of the pleasures he found at the Academy were: going into a coma until 
three hours after reveille, scaling the wall at pep rallies, reciting sea stones of 
past cruises, and trying to break even in the perennial bridge game. Although 
Boom lent his voice to the Antiphonal Choir, his favorite notes were those 
that ended the last bar of "Blue and Gold" at away football games. 



WALTER GENE CARLSON 



Westmont, Illinois 



Walt came to USNA from the Admiral Farragut Academy in New Jersey, 
and brought a diversified array of talents. His steady finger was of consider- 
able help to the Varsity Rifle Team, and his mastery of chess and gin rummy 
gave him the ability to whip almost anyone. Walt also was a model railroader, 
and the proud owner of an excellent layout back home. An OAO-less Red 
Mike, he just couldn't afford to drag after losing all his money to Crabtown's 
one-armed bandits. Walt can best be characterized by two quotations, to wit: 
"Still waters run deep" and " Tis the voice of the sluggard; I hear him com- 
plain, 'You have waked me too soon, I must slumber again'." — Isaac Watts. 






231 





DAVID MOREY CARRE. JR 



New Orlt-ans, Louisiana 



David cum- to I SN \ from New Orleans where he had spent one yeai at 
lulane University in the NROTC. He received his appointment and left the 
ROTC Voungstei cruisi to m.hi Plebe summer. During Plebe year, liis big 
di sin w ;is tn sr.i\ clear ol the !• irst ( l.iss; ;• I r In ni^li they did experience a few 
of Ins pranks. During Youngstei yeai he discovered the golf course and spent 
those weekends when he wasn't dragging, playing golf. His nickname, 
"Frenchy," comes from his French name and Ins extensive dragging, so he 
said. David's likes tend toward casual clothes, Dixieland music, and Scotch. 



RICHARD CONRAD CARRIGAN Silver Spring, Maryland 

Being a resident ol nearbj Silver Spring made Dick's life as a Mid much 
happier. Vlmost any weekend you would see Dick carrying out Ins favorite 
pastime of dragging. Straight from high school, he never had any trouble with 
academics and worked hard towards starring. Being a Greek with an Irish 
name was the source of much kidding for Dick, hur he survived that like 
everything else, with a smile. During the hours ol sports competition, Hick 
usually was one ol the backbones of the company teams, and could alwa) s be 
counted upon ro give his all during a game, which was quite typical of him. 




STANLEY GUY CATOLA 



Roswell, Nt ■ \l 



Stan left Ins home in the "Land ol Enchantment" upon completion ol high 
school, in order to come to the Naval Academy. His determination and will to 
succeed are his outstanding characteristics which inspire others to follow his 
example. In the line of sports, the game of squash offered him a challenge. 
After mastering the sport, he made it a regular pastime ro keep him in good 
physical condition during the seasons that he wasn't out for softhall or font- 
ball. It was only his modesty that kept him from becoming well known in the 
Brigade for his ability to play the steel guitar. 



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in 





ROBERT SALISBURY CECIL 



San Francisco, California 



Bob came to the Academy shortly after his graduation from high school. 
His ability to accept a new role of life was exemplified by his outstanding per- 
formance as a student, and as an athlete. Even as a Plebe, when life held few 
bright days. Bob earned his stars for proficiency in the academic phases of 
his training. An excellent swimmer, it was natural for him to choose that sport 
for his extracurricular interest. But studies and swim meets did not absorb 
Bob's entire stay at the Academy. Field trips with the Aeronautical Engineer- 
ing Club, banquets with the Spanish Club, as well as an active participation 
on the Reception Committee, rounded out his four years as a midshipman. 



CARLOS MARIO CHARN ECO. JR 



San Diego, California 



Chuck brought a California sunshine smile with him when he traveled east 
to Annapolis. His spirit was generallv as high as his academic standing, and 
any obstacle to him was merely something to conquer. His interests ran to 
photography, aeronautical engineering, and gymnastics, and he excelled in all 
of them. Chuck's ability to get a job done placed him among the top men of 
his class. No matter how large or small the task, he always did more than his 
share without complaint. With these characteristics. Chuck should have no 
trouble staying at the top. 





DAVID PORTER CHARTRAND 



Clarksburg, West Virginia 



Dave was among those who never denied that Bancroft was a good place to 
get away from, especially if it meant getting closer to West Virginia where he 
was raised. Having no trouble with academics, Dave was often found cashing 
in on his musical talents. This meant many long hours practicing with the 
"Neptunes," the famed quintet. His voice brightened many a hop. Dave 
spent many an idle hour dreaming about the hot car he was going to have 
come June '56, his aim being to convince the world that the best drivers 
come from them thar hills. 



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CHARLES NICOLAS CHAVARRIA 



ktul Lion, Pennsylvania 



M'ter .1 tour (it dun .is .1 Page m the I'. S. Senate, and a war at the Uni- 
versii \ ol Michigan as a member o( its N R( ) I C unit, Charlie lent Ins talents 
tn the Naval Vcademj . \ good student with a natural abilitj to do the right 
thing ar the ri^lu time, and an ease of getting along \\ i r h people, he made the 
"Joe College" to midshipman switch quickly and smoothly. His interests and 
abilities laj along mam Inns, but a large share of his time «.is devoted to 
Varsitj Gym, the \ntiphonal Choir, the Lucky Bag, the Glee Club, and 
dragging. Charlie's knack of getting a laugh \\ hen the outlook was the darkest, 
w a«. of great value to the rest ol n\ during the past four j cars, and it should 
alu a\ s serve him well. 




SCOTT ALBERT CHESTER Roslyn Heights, \ ) • < 

li it is possible in considei the Naval Vcademj an individual, it could be 
s.nd thai Scoti and the Naval Vcademj uot along well together, liotli con- 
tributed much to each othei .md are the bettei for the association. Scott came 
to tin Naval \cademj right from llij;h School where he was top man aca- 
demically, but had never participated in sports. \t the Vcademj he managed 
to maintain a stellar academic average while he won litters in Varsitj Cross 
Countrj and I rack. His entrance into Varsitj competition came to him as 

somewhat ol a siiipnsc as he himsell will tell, lie was also active in the 
Russian C'luk Boat (.'luh and the Math (.Tub. 



BRUCE ALAN CLARK 



// inter llurhur. \!<i m 



Bruce attended Deering lli^h School in Portland, devoting Ins spare time 
to the Civil \n Patrol and track. During his yeai ai the I Iniversitj of Maun 
he rook, an engineering course, was a member of the \rmy ROIC, and re- 
ceived freshman numerals in track. The Naval Construction Branch of tin 
Engineering Club gained Bruce as one of its most ardent followers. Although 
he learned ro s\\ im ar the earlj a^i ol lour, hi di vi ited Ins w inter sports season 
to the suh squad. Hunting, boating, photography, music, and reading con- 
tribute to his ability to enjoy life. 




234 





NAVAL ACADEMY 



GEORGE GRAFF CLARK 




Sevema Park, Maryland 



Prior to entering the Academy, George attended Severn Prep school. It was 
here that he gained an interest in the Navy and the Naval Academy. His 
appointment came through the Naval Reserve, to which he belonged for two 
years. Living in Maryland, George couldn't help but come in contact with the 
sport of lacrosse, and when not in the rack he could usually be found on the 
lacrosse field. Between lacrosse and studies George also found time for the 
fairer sex, as could be seen from the many pictures on his locker doors. One 
of George's dislikes was the great distance he had to travel to get home during 
leaves. It must have been all of ten miles. 




JAM ES MANSFI ELD CLARK 



Ashland, Ohio 



The transition from civilian life to Naval life was an easy one for "Clunk," 
for his easv-going manner and love of practical jokes remain with him still. 
The change from chemical engineering at Miami to Plebe "Skinny" was 
without difficulty for Jim — with a Rum River Crook in one hand and a bor- 
rowed pencil in the other, he breezed through his studies so he could devote 
time to his model building. Though some may wonder which is the sharper — 
his wit or his nose — man}' feel his sense of the inane was a good counter to the 
humdrum of "those davs." 



JACK DELANO CLAY 



Upper Darby, Pennsylvania 



Quiet, likable, and always busy, best describe Jack. Whether studying or 
working at his true love, track, he strove for the best. Jack sojourned to the 
trade school on the Severn after spending three years of study at Bullis Prep. 
During the fall of his Plebe year, Jack decided to try his hand at the game of 
running. Consequently, most of his time here was devoted to track and cross- 
countrv. Like many runners, Jack managed to stay just a stroke or two ahead 
of the sub-squad. Being a native Easterner, Jack's pre-leave and post-leave 
parties will long be remembered by many of us. 




6? 








235 






HAROLD ALLBEE CLEVELAND. JR. , Neu Jersey 

The small town ol Caldwell, New Jersey, claims two famous Cleveland's to 
its credit Grover, .i former President, and "Skip." \lihough he maj not be 
.in will known .is Grover, he has done quite well for himsell here ;ir Navy. 
In his Plebe year, Skip played football and was a 440 man on the nark team, 
receiving numerals in both spot is. Besides being active in com pan) sports, he 
has been the sparkplug "I tin- Second Battalion football team since the fall ol 
his Voungstei year. I all. blond, amiable, aggressive these four words 'I' 
M-i ibe Skip Cleveland. 



RICHARD VON CLOCK 



Niantic, Connecticut 



Dick exchanged his white hat for one with a blue rim after traveling far and 
wide. He did well in the course showing high scholastic and athletii merit. Mis 
onlj trouble was his inability to rnl> run dollar lulls together before payday. 

( )t his main spurts he liked tennis the most and helped lead Ins teams ro the 
championships they won. I lis favorite stud) hour pastime was solving those 
extra hard math problems and helping those who mst "couldn't see ir." His 
witty ideas made him the lite of man\ a midnight conversation. The Navj 

has done well and can point ro Dick with pride. 



CHARLES FRANKLIN COKER 



/.'/ kino. Oklahoma 



Charles came ro the Vcademy from the Sooner State. Afrer graduating 
from El Reno High in 1949, he attended El Reno College and the University 
ol Oklahoma. Nor being sen aquatic, he spent quite a bit of his time on the 
Sub Squad. Charlie was on the Varsity Crew Team and spent many afternoons 
rowing down the Severn. He was an auto racing enrhusiast. and also enjoyed 
horseback riding. USNA life rook its toll by leaving him with a receding hair- 
line, but it couldn't change his affable nature. 




UNITED STATES 








it* 



CORNELIUS EMMETT COLEMAN, JR. New York, New York 

Straight from high school — this lad. Though one of the youngest in the 
class he did more than hold his own. Never one to flee, Connie applied his 
speed and endurance to track, where he stood high among Battalion milers. 
Out of season he staved in shape with company steeplechase and cross- 
country. OAO had one meaning to Connie — one among others. It seemed as 
though he had a different girl for everv mood. He is characterized bv his cheer- 
ful smile, interrupted at times by a very dignified look of amazement when 
plans go afoul, and by his fluent conversation enriched with just a touch of le 
francais. 



MERRILL FRANCIS COLLIER 



New Richmond, Ohio 



Truly an outstanding member of his class, Merrill served as Class President 
and served, also, on the Honor, Hop, and Brigade Activities Committees. 
Dynamic was the word to describe him, and he adapted quickly to any new 
situation that arose. Coming from the fleet, where he served in the Korean 
Theater as a 3/C Electronics Technician, Merrill brought to the Academy 
a tennis racquet and a ukulele, both of which got plenty of exercise. Singing 
also caught Merrill's interest and he could often be heard crooning to the 
accompaniment of the NA-10 at the hops. Always sought out for his sound 
advice and timely humor, Merrill was a popular spirit lifter when the days 
looked darkest. 



JOHN BURD COLLINS 



Washington, District of Columbia 



An exceptional liking for the military service is Jack's most apparent 
quality. Coming to the Naval Academy directly from high school, he soon 
realized what the service demands, and was quick to adjust himself accord- 
ingly. Finding little difficulty academically Jack turned to the various sports 
offered at the Academy. He did exceptionally well on the swimming and 
Varsity Squash Squads. Jack's accomplishments thus far in his military 
career reflect his ability to perform his duties both quickly and efficiently. 



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237 





1 B9P> i T 












UNITED STATES 



LEROY COLLINS. JR. 



Tallahassee, Florida 



I he biggest hurricane to come up From the Land of Sunshine hir the Naval 
Academy late in June ol '52. ["he original "crazylegs" soon become one of the 
must popular muls in Crabtown. Roj attacked Ins studies with such a furj 
r h ;i r even Skinny couldn't ^ct him down. I hen, as il academics were meant to 
consume onl) .1 small portion "I the day, R03 w.is seen spending many hours 
in the shops o( Isherwood. Most ol Run's weekends were taken up dragging, 
and here he was .1 master. He didn't reserve .ill Ins talents in si for the girls 
man) a bull session found him read) to take part. Mis laugh had us own 
tonic, and Ins personality demonstrated the effect ol this likable medicine. 

THOMAS MC CULLOCH COLMAN Grand Junction, Colorado 

Right after Imn left Grand Junction, they found Uranium near l>\ and it 
is rumored that they would have found it sooner il I om hadn't raised so much 
Just with Ins hot-rod. Coming to Nav) fresh out ol In^h school, he found little 
trouble with the academics, so he proceeded to supplement them with si ii m 1 
fiction. Radio and electrical engineering wen .ilso crammed into Ins schedule 
via the Juice Gang. His sense of humoi elled onlj bj his abilit) to win 

friends; and, e\ en though Ins retelling ruined man) good jokes, he \\ as always 
n ad) with a humorous anecdote. \lulit\ is Ins companion in the future. 



GEORGE SYLVESTER CONNOLLY. JR. Maplewood, New Jersey 

1 oming to th< Naval Vcadem) after two years at Newark College of 
Engineering, George considered most ol the academics fruit. \ versatile 
athlete, he participated in virtually all sports with equal ease and capability, 
showing outstanding proficiency ;it basketball, winch he churns as his favorite. 
\ subdued practical jokester :it heart, George knew how to play ;i joke, and 
better yet, how to take one. Aside from his sports and pranks, he became par- 
ticularl) famous tor his ability to sleep anywhere anytime. His easygoing 
attitude gave him the ability to take all obstacles in stride. 




238 




3* 




NAVAL ACADEMY 



JOHN EDWARDS CONWAY 




Paola, Kansas 



John came to the Academy from the plains of Kansas in open mouth aston- 
ishment at seeing so much water in one place. One of the youngest men in our 
class, John made the big jump from a small high school in Kansas without the 
benefit of any college training. The Fall season found him losing weight for 
ISO Pound Football, but the rest of the year he was a firm believer in the rack 
as the salvation of man. After Youngster year it was a toss up whether he was 
prouder of his N sweater or his National Defense ribbon. Some day John plans 
to go back to Kansas and spend his time drilling oil wells. 




RICHARD DONALD COOK 



Alexandria, Loui 



Don came to Navy through a Naval Reserve appointment after completing 
one year at Louisiana College. He excelled in every form of athletics encount- 
ered at Navy, and was especially famous for his savage blocking on the com- 
pany football team. No matter what sport he played, he put everything he had 
into it, making him welcome on any intramural sports squad. Don enjoyed 
dragging at Navy and whenever there was a hop you could be sure of finding 
him there, cutting a neat rug. When he finds a spare moment, Don will prob- 
ably be found playing bridge. His friendly nature and great enthusiasm for 
everything he attempted made Don a great asset to the Naval Academy. 



ROSS EARL COOK 



Ffitchton, Indiana 



From the heart of the Hoosier farmland, Ross joined the Class of 1956 
following a year at Vincennes University. When not on the athletic field or 
acting in the capacity of company or NACA representative, Ross could be 
found wrapped up in a card game or writing letters. Although he never lettered 
in a varsity sport, he certainly deserved one for the Sub Squad. He was a 
natural aviation candidate, not only because of his great love for flying, but 
also because of his vast experience with the "Flying Squadron" after the hops. 
To you, Ross, here's wishing for ceilings unlimited, and many happy landings ! 





239 










WILMER PAUL COOK Annapolis, Maryland 

Hill came t.i us via the Universit) of Maryland and the \ii Force ROTC 
w here he \\ as first introduced to the rigors <>\ military life ( ?). Born and raised 
in Crabtown, Bill never missed an opportunity 'legally or otherwise) to escape 
the solemn gra) u .ills foi .i bit of home life. Academically, he never ceased to 
Imlil f hi interest "I Ins instructors. Weekdaj afternoons he could l>< found 
playing midfield <>n the Battalion Lacrosse team. Radio was Ins hobby, and 
man) were the study hours he spent m n^ to coax .1 se< ondai j current out "I 
the radiators "I the First Wing. Bill's witticisms, practical jokes, and unfailing 
good linniiir considerably lightened the long days of the l)aik \ges. 



JULIAN LOWELL COOLIDGE. II 



\ orwalk, Connecticut 



Forsaking .1 chance to g<> rn Harvard, fewels came to the Vcademj from 
Hotchkiss. As ;i member "I rlu- Varsity Swimming I earn he could always be 
found in the Natatorium during the Fall and Winter months. In spring he 
kept trim with :i well plaj ed set of tennis two nr three rimes a week. I Ine 1 ould 
readily see rliar he was :i pipe smoker of long standing by the way he selected 
:i briar from the collection in the rack, expertly rilled ir. and putted awaj 
pleasantl) while going about his business. A game and good fellow, Jewels 
was always ready ro join in any weekend escapade his tnends suggested. 



JAMES LEE COOPER 



Xorih I'latie. Nebraska 



Resigning his position as Boj Governor of Nebraska, bur not his rank of 
Admiral in the Nebraskan Navy. Jim stepped our of high school nghr into the 
Vcademy. W hile rhe rest of us were clutched up with the rigors of Plebe year, 
ip" easily rook everything in stride and snll found time ro play basket- 
ball on the '56 squad. Jim's unique sparkle came as a result of his keen insight 
and undersranding. Never found wanting in any situation, Jim could always 
be counted on for a helping hand, a kind word, a quick smile or, perhaps, a 
beautiful drag. With an eye on the future, Jim took advantage of every oppor- 
tunity to improve himself. 




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240 




JAMES ROGERS COPELAND 



Peru, New York 



Jim took the big step from Peru Central High to the Naval Academy with 
little trouble. When he discovered that Bancroft Hall contained a fine amateur 
radio station and an Aeronautical Engineering Club, he felt right at home. 
Deeply religious, Jim devoted much of his time to NACA and Bible Study 
Groups. He also enjoyed the Foreign Relations Club meetings because he be- 
lieved in keeping abreast of world developments. His favorite athletic activity 
was pulling the number two oar for the Varsity 150 lb. Crew Team. Likeable, 
sincere and hardworking, Jim set a good example for us all. 



CHARLES WESLEY CORKINS. JR 



Pensacola, Florida 



To Corky, a Navy junior, coming to the Academy was the fulfillment of a 
long awaited desire. An average student, he had a few ups and downs, but 
always managed to retain his happy, friendly attitude. If Corky enjoyed any- 
thing more than making friends, it was making them laugh. The Aviation Club 
and Public Relations Committee claimed most of his time, but he devoted 
many afternoons to cross country and steeplechase. Showing his drags the 
best of Navy athletics, and frequenting the Saturday night hops were stand- 
ard weekend procedure, but occasionally Corky would forsake his feminine 
friends in favor of a bridge game in a smoke-filled room. 





DELBERT JASON CORY 



Dayton, Ohio 



Del, a graduate of Central High School in South Bend, Indiana, came to the 
Academy after spending one year as a chemistry major and an NROTC stu- 
dent at Purdue University. He appreciates good music, and is capable of pro- 
ducing same on the trombone. Most any day, strains of classical music could 
be heard emanating from his room. His sport interest included fencing and 
playing football for the "Sizzling Second." He has many hobbies which include 
everything from butterfly collecting to spelunking; and he works hard at any 
task he undertakes. His intense religious interest gained him much respect, 
and made him a leader of Brigade religious activities. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



241 











UNITED STATES 



KENNETH LYNN COSTILOW Grenada, Musi* i ippi 

Ken came to USNA from the Bayou State via the fleet. After spending two 
years as a whitehat, he took the opportunity to come to Annapolis. In prep 
school at Bainbridge, he majored in liberty and finance. At Annapolis he con- 
tinued to enjoy his liberty on Wednesday afternoons and weekends except 
when it conflicted with his training for the Light-weight Crew Team. Aside 
from crew, his varsity sport. Ken played fieldball for his company team. His 
talents ranged from Sundaj school teaching to being a man of letters. Although 
tin Academy hie cramped liis Southern independence, ir never dampened his 
spirit. 




EDWARD JOHN COVEY 



Lansing, Ohio 



H2 



Ed, was. In inclination an officer, by temperament a gentleman, by dint of 
haul work a star man and an earnest oarsman, by virtue ol regulations, a 
bachelor. He came to us via d stroyi i dutj in Korea, and Bainbridge NAPS. 
\n ardent advocate of Navj spoits. Navj ships. Navy airplanes, and Italian 
spaghetti, Ed brought an unusual degree of humor and mature judgment into 
the Seventh Company. I le never did undertake his threat to use his E I experi- 
ence and rewrite the juice hook so that it was understandable, hut he did suc- 
ceed m writing many new words into the Spanish Language during the club 
meetings. 



DONALD EUGENE COYNE 



Yonkers, New York 



In mi his name to his red hair. Don was an Irishman and never hesitated 
to remind anyone who forgot. Here was a man that was liked and respected by 
everyone. Always ready to lend a helping hand he was called upon often and 
never tailed to answer. His chosen sport at the academy, cross country, exem- 
plified his attitude in everything he did. for it takes a strong will and a strong 
heart to succeed at this sport. Although the Varsity Cross Country I earn left 
him little leisure, he still found time to take an active parr in the Foreign Rela- 
S Club and the Newman Club. Don will he best remembered aspiring to 
his motto: "never waste a minute." 






NAVAL ACADEMY 



ROBERT JAMES CRAIG 



AHadena, California 



Bob came to Navy Tech from NAPS where he demonstrated his outstanding 
ability as an athlete. Prior to his entrance into the Navy, he attended John 
Muir College for two years, along with his life long buddy and four-year room- 
mate at the Academy, Don Alser. Everything except Spanish came pretty 
easy for Bob, including the well deserved most-valuable-player award in the 
Oyster Bowl game with Duke. OfFthe athletic field, he enjoyed his other love — 
the sack. Lasting patience and an easy going attitude, for which he was always 
admired, lightened life at the Academy for him, and undoubtedly will help 
him succeed in whatever field he undertakes. 




ROBERT PATRICK CRAVEN 



Washington, D.C. 



Bob came to us from D.C. and Bullis Prep. An avid sportsman, he could 
frequently be found discussing the advantages of spinning rods, Canadian 
trout and fine Scotch whiskey. When not shooting magnanimous scores down 
at the pistol range, he could be found over at the wrestling loft picking up new 
tricks on judo. Although he arrived at USNA barely out of swaddling clothes, 
his speckled grey hair and worldly ways would lead one to think otherwise. On 
weekends he could frequently be seen with one of the fairer sex, and at social 
gatherings, he was always called on to deliver a few of his choice oratories in 
that fine Irish manner. 



FORREST WAYNE CRONE 



Behndere, Illi 



Squirt came to the Navy school from the average mid-western town of 
Belvidere, Illinois. Before deciding on a service career, he spent half a year at 
Illinois State Normal University and a year at Marion Institute in Alabama. 
Being a good athlete, Squirt devoted four years to the Crew team, three years 
of them on the Varsity squad. He was active in other extracurricular activities, 
and as chairman of the 19S6 Class Crest and Ring Committee was largely re- 
sponsible for the fine job done there. Not a man to be outdone, Squirt excelled 
in eating, finding time to sleep, and enjoying himself at parties. 






243 





TIMOTHY JOSEPH CRONIN. JR 



Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 



Uthough claiming allegiance onh to USMC from whence he came, I im 
showed considerable interest in the life at the Academy. Besides being quite 
proficient in academics and .1 commendable athlete, he spent much of his 
time on extracurricular activities practicularl) thosi that would help him 
satisfy his curiosity about electric and electronic equipment. It asked, he 
would probabl) answer fli.it tin- visits to flu natatorium wire the least enjoy- 
able part nt' tin- curriculum, hut nevertheless, In- winked on and overcame Ins 
difficulties in that field, lie often stated Ins disapproval ol alcohol and tin 
opposite sex. Imt on occasion In- could In- seen taking a social drink or escorting 
.1 \ oung lady. 

HENRY FRED CULBERSON. JR. Gainesville, G 1 

"Big Fred" was well prepared for \cadem\ lite, having spent two years at 
North ( ieorgia Military College. I lis independence made In in extreme!) popu- 
lar Plebe year, and he consequent!) spent a good part ol Ins tune in first class 
rooms. A tine athlete. Fred was on both tin- Plebe Football and Baseball 
I e.mis. hut injuries prevented him from participating in varsity athletics. 
First, last, and always a lover, nothing was so rare as to find I' red without a 
drag when the weekend rolled around, lie studied religiously and spent his 
spare time figuring what to do upon bilging out. Not succumbing i" .<> ademics, 
however, lied staved on. an asset to the company and the pride ot Dixie. 




CHARLES GLENN CURTIS 



Saguache, Colorado 



Chuck Curtis was born and raised in the small town of Saguache, and didn't 
see too much of the rest of the world before he started his college career. He 
attended the University ot Colorado for one year prior to entering the Naval 
Academy. An intelligent man with some definite ideas and the ability to learn 
easily, Chuck was also a very tine athlete. His favorite sport was skiing, but 
he didn't get too much practice at it while at rhe Academy. He was also a good 
football player, lacrosse man, and company tieldball player. Chuck had a good 
many friends during his stay at the Academy and was admired by his class- 
mates. 



: l^i UNITED STATES 




LOUIS CHOPIN CUSACHS 



Natchitoches, Louisiana 



Choppy came to USNA from his hometown Northwestern State College 
with his athletic career behind him, and carefully limited his exercise to pipe 
smoking and debating. His academics never gave him as much trouble as 
deciding which club meeting to attend. His crusade to convert the Mess Hall 
to a French cuisine never quite succeeded, but he did adopt pineapple fritters 
and creamed chipped beef. An individualist, Choppy would join any bull 
session at the drop of a bottle, and his poetry sometimes found its way into 
the Trident Magazine. Nobody could use more imagination in explaining the 
workings of an irregular Catalan verb, but few would want to. 



PAUL BERNARD CUSICK 



Marion, Ohio 



After graduating from high school, Paul decided to travel. To satisfy this 
desire he enlisted in the Navy. Just before his tour was up, Paul decided that 
he liked the Navy life and decided to come to the Academy. Here at the 
Academy, Paul took up gymnastics, a hitherto strange sport to him. He 
managed to become an accomplished gymnast in his four year stay at Navy, 
much to his pleasure and Navy's gain. His interests varied from sports to 
dancing, and from listening to good music to playing his harmonica. A happy 
go lucky attitude enabled Paul to get along well with everyone, and should 
continue to be an asset to him in the future. 





BYRON ALTON CYR 



Portsmouth, New Hampshire 



A cheerful smile and a carefree attitude accompanied Byron to Canoe U. 
after a hitch in the Navy and a trip through the future admiral factory, 
NAPS. He managed to tear himself away from his Mario Lanza records often 
enough to participate in company soccer, Batt golf and Plebe Pistol, all the 
while lamenting the fact that Navy didn't offer hockey. His mania for fresh 
air knew no bounds and his roommates were often treated to the wintry blasts 
off the Severn. Byron mixed bridge games with other leisure activities, to the 
great satisfaction of those who enjoyed his infectious laugh and slam bidding. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



245 








UNITED STATES 



VERNON ALLAN DANDER 



Stockton, California 



\ ii i) came to the Academy from Stockton College in California, where he 
lettered in track and Football and stood number one academically. Here at 
Navj Vern continued his rim- record, llis studies were tops and he proved his 
athletic ability on the Varsity Football ream. I lis favorite pastimes were 
racking our and hunting prize winning scenes with his camera. Once in a while 
you'd riml him trying to get ahead in a fast game ol solitaire, too. During 
second class year Vern had a turn before the camera himself, ami appeared in 
a national magazine spread about the Academy, with some of Ins equall) 
debonair classmates. 




RUDOLPH HALOUK DAUS New York City, New York 

Moti\ and In Ins desire to serve in the Naval Service, Rudy chose the Naval 
\cademj as i In- college \\ lure he should complete Ins education, alter spending 
a Near at I'ordhain I . following a liberal arts curriculum. By virtue of his 
European heritage, Rud) speaks French ami lurkish fluently, and this has 
held him in good stead on many an occasion. I lis versatile nature was dis- 
played in the main activities in which he took parr while at the Naval Acad- 
emy. Besides organizing a trick drill team, he fenced three years on the Var- 
sity leam. lie was active in the French Club, ol which he was elected Presi- 
dent, and on the Reception Committee. Yet he still managed t" keep up his 
academics. 



PAUL JOSEPH DAVIDSON 



Fairha ■ . 1/ as rachusetts 



I pun graduation from the Massachusetts Maritime \> ademj . Paul de< idi 'I 
to try the course again at the Naval Academy. "Dad" Davidson soon came to 
he known as the answer man in academics. I lis extra instruction in Steam and 
I lid n a nee helped keep m an \ a classmate passing for the course. Paul's genuine 
personality won a hosr of friends for him at Navy; his foremosl trait being 
modesty. During the fall and sprint Paul could be found with the crew squad 
on the Severn, while in the winter he gave Ins company basketball team that 
extra go. Although he led a routine life in the eyes of the Executive Depart- 
ment, Paul made up for it on those summer cruises. A parry was never slow 
with energetic Paul present. 




246 






NAVAL ACADEMY 



JOE REX DAVIS Indianapolis, Indiana 

"Now you have to look at this matter from the positive angle." That's 
Rex's philosophy on living, and one of the reasons why he was so popular 
with his classmates. Never a brooder, he was a real Hoosier all the way. Rex 
was no Radiator Squad man, either, as his ability as a runner and his frequent 
participation in all varieties of athletics testify. He was always ready to lend 
a helpful ear to any of his company-mates with problems involving the fairer 
sex, and the consistently good quality of his own drags indicate that he knew 
what he was talking about. Around Bancroft or on liberty, Rex always 
merited the popularity he had with his many friends. 




SIDNEY FANT DAVIS. Ill 



Toledo, Ohio 



Sid arrived at USNA after having traveled the Great Lakes route, and from 
the start, awaited the day when he could ask some Plebe, "What's the second 
largest coal export city in the world, mister?" He will be remembered for his 
ventures with the New York Stock Exchange, the ritual of morning stock 
quotations, and the ups and downs of a certain aircraft company. It must be 
recorded that any Plebe who survived his witty tongue lashings, weathered a 
real storm, and should have it easy from here on. If Sid has his way, he'll 
someday settle down to the occupation and title of Country Squire. 



DAVID LOREN DEBUS 



Manitowish Waters, Wisconsin 



Dave came to USNA from the lake country of Northern Wisconsin. Even 
after a year at the University of Wisconsin, he got his grades through hard 
work and application. Dave put his musical talent to the Brigade's benefit by 
holding down his share of the sax section of the NA-10, and by taking the 
annual trip to Hood College for his participation with the Chapel Choir. Pull- 
ing his share of the athletic load, he played on company fieldball, Softball and 
cross-country teams as well as Plebe Lacrosse. Always conscientious in every- 
thing he had a hand in, including liberty, Dave took everything as it came 
along, concentrating on one thing at a time, to produce 4.0 results. 






247 




4 






*•* 





GEORGE MORETON DECELL. Ill 



Brookhaven, Mississippi 



\ Southerner in the truest sense ol the word, C ■ < < . r l^ ■ cami to us via the 
fleet and college, where he excelled in Football. During his Plebe year he tried 
Ins utninst tu transform the \cademy into a country club, but tin. ilk settled 
foi .1 stake in the QSN \ golf course, w here he spent many an aften n pound- 
ing ■ • ii r ;i winning score. Academics competed with bridge for his attention, 
bur he always found time to sing in the choir. George's righting spirit proved 
an invaluable asset on the football field at Navy. An inspiration to many a 
plebe, Gi g demonstrated outstanding leadership ability. Manj a classmate 
will value Ins warm friendship during the years to come. 

ARSENIO LOPEZ DELGADO ^California 

Vrsenio, better known by his friends as Hud. hails from the little Southern 
California border town of Calexico, where, he chums, they make the world's 
lust tamales. After spending three broadening years in California colleges, 
among them two at UCL \. Vrsenio made his way tu the Naval Academy. 

I [en . hi set "lit to prove that a desert citizen can develop a sincere apprecia- 
tion for the ways of the sea. Vrsenio made use of his spare time by being a 
member of the Photographs. Aeronautical Engineering, and Foreign Lan- 
guages clubs, \lthough Arsenio claims tennis to be his favorite sport, there are 
many who would say, in witnessing his feats after the liberty bell has rung, 
that he makes an excellent track man. 

EUGENE JOHN OE NEZZA Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

ne, who was born and raised in Pittsburgh, will always be remembered 
as one of the city's most ardent boosters. He would gladly extoll the virtues of 
smoke-tree Pittsburgh to anyone who had several hours to listen. Gene came 
directly to the Naval Academy from Central Catholic High, which prepared 
him well academically. His favorite subjects were history and math, and his 
nemesis. Dago. He spent much of his time on the company and Battalion ath- 
letic squads. But when liberty call was sounded, Gene could inevitably be 
found enjoying his favorite pastime, the movies. 



UNITED STATES 



24- 





WALTER SAM DENHAM, JR 



Newport, Rhode Island 



Walt, a gift to USNA from the big state of Rhode Island, entered via the 
Marine Corps. He always maintained he was the smallest man in the company, 
but the toughest. His two favorite pastimes were girls and classical music. His 
favorite piece of music was Beethoven's 9th. Walt liked to argue either 
side of a question just for laughs. He always enjoyed the sports program 
in the afternoon, especially soccer. His chief complaints against USNA were 
not enough rack time, and too many days between weekends. His well known 
cry "They can't do this to me" is probably still echoing in the Fifth Wing of 
Bancroft Hall. 



NICHOLAS JAMES DENUNZIO 



Morristown, New Jersey 



Nick came to the Naval Academy from the beautiful state on the east coast 
known as New Jersey. Born in colonial Morristown, he graduated from Morris- 
town High School, and attended Rutgers University before making the big 
change to Annapolis and the Academy. Nick alwaj^s did well in academics, as 
shown by the stars on his collar. His favorite subjects were Calculus and 
Plebe Skinny, while his biggest dislike came in the form of Steam — Youngster 
style. Short in stature but long in brains, he was, nevertheless, an ardent 
booster of the company sports squads. Nick's love of a good discussion usually 
led him to take the viewpoint on a subject opposite to the majority. 





JAMES VINCENT D ETORE, JR 



Burlington, Vermont 



Jim was brought up on the shores of Lake Champlain, so when he left the 
green hills of Vermont it was natural that he join the Navy. After finishing an 
enlistment, he decided on a Navy career and entered USNA. With his previous 
military training he took the system in stride and encountered little difficulty 
with academics. Despite his easv-going manner, he was a hard worker; not one 
for the radiator squad, Jim liked to keep in shape. His favorite sport was play- 
ing outfield for the company Softball team. His favorite diversions from 
Academy life were summer and Christmas leaves, and an occasional drag from 
time to time. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



249 








UNITED STATES 



DAVID WARD DEUTERMANN 



Washington, D.C. 



\ttt i a year and a half in the Fleet, the Dutchman chose Annapolis over a 
large, comfortable, coed college, and has been bewailing the fact ever since. 
I It-Ill constantly ar bay by the academic departments, Dutch managed to 
squeeze in a year apiece on the Plebe and Varsity RiHt- Squads before dis- 
covering that Tea Fights were both more entertaining and athletic. A couple 
nt seasonal stints on the Battalion gym teams. Log illustrating, and night 
operations off Carvel Hall complete the Dutchman's picture, as Mother Ban- 
croft loses one ol her more distinguished denizens by way ol diploma. 



NATHANIEL OTIS DEVOLL 



Milwaukee, Wist 




Nat hails from the land ol the Braves, and he w as quick to remind people ol 
it during baseball season. \n avid sports enthusiast, he spent a good deal of 
his time on the Varsitj Squash courts, but his real love was baseball. Somehow 
Nat acquired the enviable talent ol getting good grades w ithout studying, and 
lacing each new day with a smil< Despiti these sparkling qualifications, he 
had <me weakness blondes. Nai didn't drag often because his weekends were 
occupied with sports. Hut whenever he did, Ins date was always a queen. Nat 
was a tun competitoi and a likable man who added a gnat deal to his class. 



CHARLES JOSEPH DIBONA 



Quincy, Massachusetts 



Charlie made his waj to Vnnapolis from another historic city. Quincy, 
Massachusetts. During his four years ar the \cath -m\ . he managed the 18th 
Company soccer team, and spent winter afternoons pounding on the podium 
tor tin Naval \cademv forensic Society. Another of his fa vorite extracurric- 
ular activities was building an impressive list ol female companions from 
North. East, Smith and West. Charlie was well liked and his superior aca- 
demic abilities were always available to his classmates in the Hall, especially 
when the g"inc got a little rough in Second Class Skinny. His personality 
and abilities will assure him of a successful career and a good rime in the 





250 




NAVAL ACADEMY 



KENNETH ALVIN DICKERSON 




Pocatello, Idaho 



Ken came to Navy by way of Pocatello and Idaho State College. Although 
he found the Academy quite different from Idaho State, he soon became ac- 
customed to life at Navy. His free time was usually spent in engaging in ath- 
letics of one form or another. His only regret was that Maryland had no snow — 
since his leaves were usually spent skiing. A natural athlete. Ken took handily 
to lacrosse and his winter afternoons were spent on Hospital Point with the 
heavyweight football team. Try as he might, no one was able to change his 
loyalty to the gals out West. 




JAMES ALLEN DICKEY Medicine Lodge, Kansas 

Jim came to the Naval Academy from Kansas State College and a tour of 
duty at Pensacola with the Naval Reserve. During Youngster year, he ac- 
quired an aquatic nickname but not because of his ability in the Natatorium. 
His extended social life did not interfere with his academics, because he often 
spent otherwise idle weekends in the books. A pet peeve was the service in the 
eating establishments in town, but he spent many liberty hours imbibing the 
"mud" they served so slowly. Thursday nights found him mustering with the 
Varsity Choir, for he loved to sing. 



ROBERT EUGENE DIEDRICH 



Stevens Point, Wisconsin 



Four years ago. Bump ended his long journey to Crabtown in his most 
prized possession, a canary-yellow, '34 Ford with green sidewalls. But with 
the coming of the shaving from the fifth wing barber's school, he temporarily 
put away his thoughts of girls and good times, and got down to being a "Star" 
in both academics and his favorite sports, (ugh!) steeplechase and cross 
country. Bump constantly displayed a happy disposition at the Academy, and 
certainly made the best of his leave time. He has always been ready and willing 
to help any and all who needed it, right down to the "Ploobs", 






251 






EDWARD KENNEDY DILLARD lialeyville, .Hah, mm 

Having graduated from Haleyville Nigh School whin he was outstanding 
on rlu- gridiron, Ed enlisted in tin- \.iv\. After two years in the fleet, he ex- 
changed his blue jacket for rlu- gold buttons of a Midshipman. I lis Southern 
manner, smile, and get-along-with attitude made Ed a favorite with 

his classmates. I lis determination and hard work were reflected in his stead} 
improvement with regard to the academic side "I Academy life. Athletically, 
Ed did more than his share on rlu- company intramural teams, where he was 
an especially good football player. His easy smile, friendliness, and modesty 
were rlu- outstanding qualities for which he was admired. 



WILLIAM MAURICE DILLON 



Berkeley, Illinois 



Bill split the three year period separating his high school graduation from 
his entrance to rlu- Academy evenly between the LTniversitj ol Illinois and 

the U. S. \rmv. Parr of his service time was spent at the U. S. Military 
Vcadem) Preparatory School. However, it didn't take him long to discovei 
the error of his ways, and he soon was standing firm on Severn's shores. 
Among his lists of the pleasures of life, beside the more obvious subjects of the 
fairer sex and dancing, are football, sailing, and the current trends in the 
automotive world. On rlu- athletic side, we could find Bill spending weeks on 
end in the practice pool improving himself under the guiding hand of the sub 
squad instructors. 



HAROLD JOSEPH DOEBLER. II 



Topinabee, Michigan 



Joe, a former page hoy and Coast (uiard Junior, adapted readily to the 
Navy life. Not of the top scholastic clique, he thought starring was having all 
marks above 3.0. lie liked to divide all that "extra" time between dragging, 
photography, and possibly an occasional sailing or engineering trip. He might 
be remembered most for his uncanny ability to finish each swimming require- 
ment in a dead heat with the clock. Some day. in that far distant future. Joe 
thinks he will return to that little town in Michigan that boasts of having the 
largest sawdust pile in the world. 




UNITED STATES 



252 




WILLIAM CHARLES DOERN ER 



Palisades Park, New Jersey 



After graduating from Leonia High School, spending one and a half years 
at Pace College, and serving in the Marines for two years, Bill decided to look 
for greener pastures and came to Navy via NAPS. While at the Academy, 
Jake, as he is known by most of us, finding no barriers in the academics, 
divided his time between sports and the fairer sex. While active in many 
sports, Jake won fame on the soccer field with his undying spirit and drive. 
Weekends found him either dragging or surveying the situation at one of the 
local social events. To Jake, the Marines are second to none, but he will be a 
welcome addition to whatever branch of the service he chooses. 



HAROLD EDMOND DOLENGA 



Detroit, Michigan 



The transition from campus life at Wayne University in Detroit, Michigan, 
to a Plebe year was quite a shock, but somehow Hal survived it all. The Sub 
Squad, Skinny Department, and Russian course were among his many con- 
quests here at the Academy. Hal got plenty of exercise by trying to keep one 
jump ahead of the Academic Department and by bringing up the rear in many 
a crosscountry and steeplechase meet. Debating was his great love and he was 
a difficult man to beat in an argument. Hal's occasional visits to the Language 
and Engineering Clubs, to which he faithfully paid his dues, occupied what 
little leisure time was left. Of course, he also found time for the girl from home. 





BRUCE HAMI LTON DOLPH 



Cornwall-on-Hudson, New York 



Born in Brooklyn and reared in Cornwall-on-Hudson, which is only five 
miles from West Point, Bruce grew up with a strong desire to attend the Naval 
Academy. After a year at the University of Rochester, his chance came to 
fulfill that wish. While at the Academy he added life to almost any occasion 
whether it was just a leisurely conversation or a fast game of handball. His 
ability to inject humor into any sort of an otherwise depressing situation 
made him quite an asset to any organization. Bruce's favorite pastime was 
golf, but he liked almost all sports. He was the only man in the Academy that 
talked faster than Walter Winchell. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



2S3 








UNITED STATES 



JOHN FRANCIS DONAHUE 



llavertozun, Pennsylvania 






Entering the Academy from Episcopal Academy, John immediately became 
a starter for Karl Kitt's Plebe wrestling squad. As the rigors of Plebe year 
meshed with those of Youngster and Second Class year, Coach Ray Swartz's 
wrestling squad used our little 123 pound stick ot dynamite verj effectively. 
In addition to all types of athletics, John's hobbies include sleeping and 
eating. A Philadelphia native, John served in the Naval Reserve before mak- 
ing his hig jump to Crabtow n. Although June and C iraduation separated John 
for man} of his classmates, a mental picture ol bis winning smile will always 
be with ns. 




NEIL DONOVAN 



fi rook/ vii. New York 



K 



I he halls of Bancroft have never been the same, since the day this smiling 
I rishman decided to leave the ferrj boat \\ histles ol deai old Brooklyn in favoi 
of the YP horns of the Academy. In Neil, the service gained not only a 
mechanically minde'd officer, but a vivacious personality as well. I In pom 
man's Cyrano brought with him a loudness for machines ol any kind, good 
music, bigger and bettei patties, useless souvenirs to clutter up the room. 
pizzas, and. m fact, food m general. Lacrosse, football, VVRNV, and model 
building took up most ol his spare time; that is. when he couldn't go on 
liberty. 



DONALD MOBRAY DOUGLAS 



Beaumont, Texai 



Don rccei\ ed Ins early training at Beaumont I ligh School and upon gradua- 
tion, attended Marion Institute for two years prior to entering the Naval 
Vcademy. An avid sports fan, Don closelj followed Navy as well as national 
sports teams. He participated in Plebe and intramural soccer, as well as com- 
pany football. Although the rigors of Plebe year combined with academic 
difficulties, consumed a great deal of his spare time in bis first year, Don 
showed a marked improvement throughout the rest ol the time he spent at 
the Academy. Don was a popular man of subtle humor and a very likeable 
personality. Not even his practical jokes could discourage people from seeking 
his friendship. 



254 






NAVAL ACADEMY 



FRANK JAMES DRAYTON, JR. Detroit, Michigan 

The Academy received a very likeable person when Frank came here. He 
was a hard worker and a constant driver on the football field and in his 
academics also. What he lacked in the Bull Department he made up for in 
engineering ability. Frank has always been good at plugging formulas and has 
followed this three word formula — PICK your course of study, STICK to it, 
and STUDY it. One thing for certain — whatever he undertakes will be done 
in all sincerity and to the best of his ability, for he takes a personal pride in 
even the most menial of tasks. 




RODERICK ARTHUR DRESSER 



Carmel, California 



Rod could always be counted on to come up with a solution to any given 
problem. There was never a challenge which he would not accept. You could 
find him every afternoon in the weight lifting loft where he diligently worked 
to keep himself in good shape. Rod's second love, after food, was a good party 
and a good crowd. Speaking of crowds, Rod was always the center of one, for 
his variety of stories never ceased to amuse those about him. He was always 
ready with his quick wit which made him so popular with the opposite sex. 
Rod, however, took one thing seriously and this was his home state of Cali- 
fornia. 



DONALD LEROY DUDROW 



Xe 



Ohio 



One year of college and NROTC was enough to convince Dud that the 
place to learn to be a naval officer was at the Academy. Hiding a fertile brain 
behind a quiet and unassuming manner, he was forever hatching up and 
carrying into effect, ideas conceived on the spur of the moment. Dud had 
quite a talent for fixing things and spent many hours working over his radio. 
His was a rather full love life, but he still managed to evade any entangling 
alliances. As Dud was not very interested in athletics, he turned his talents 
to the finer arts of polishing brass on the Batt yawl, and scrubbing down the 
bilges. 






255 





WILLIAM PETER DUNSAVAGE Mahanoy City, Pennsylvania 

I as; tu get along with, Bill was :i Mid with man) friends. As an ardent 
sports enthusiast he was often seen finishing in first place in steeplechase, 
track. "i cross country. Youngster Cruise to Rio made him a travel lover for 
life. He spent his summer leaves touring the continent of Europe and making 
many new friends while enjoying the pleasures of the European cities. Anxietj 
for his Mother's cooking always brought the traveler home aftei a tour of the 
fai ofl places. Bill was noted for his girls. Buick convertible, and pood marks. 
Ilis love tor polkas and dragging led linn to almost every hop. 



MICHAEL JOSEPH DWYER. JR. 



Elizabeth, Nezv Jersey 






From tlu- coastal state of New Jersey, came Mike to Navy lech. Before 
becoming a stalwart on the line for the Third Bart, football team. Mike was 
in the Navy. He took his bootcamp at Great Lakes, and then went to Bain- 
bridge and NAPS. \\ hile at Bainbridge, Mike excelled in his favorite sport of 
football. During his tenure at Canoe I .. Mike was outstanding in academics, 
and was always sought by his classmates for the gouge-of-the-day. Although 
football was his favorite pastime. Mike could usually he found in the rack. I lis 
w ill 1 ng ear for troubles will be missed by many of his classmates because Mike 
always had time to listen to other's rales of woe. 




NATHANIEL BROWN DYER JR 



Bradenlon, Florida 



Bidding a fond adieu to the beaches and gals of the "Sunshine State," Skip 
came to his new home in Mother Bancroft via a SECNAV appointment. No 
matter how bad things seemed, he always managed to come up with his by- 
word "Let's have a party" and cheer the gang up. Softball and volleyball for 
the company, and the "Pogo Papers" comprised his extracurricular activities, 
along with as much fun as could possibly be derived from those "Oh, so good" 
liberties and leaves. Skip firmly believed that a sense of humor could make 
even the most disagreeable situation bearably pleasant, and he proved his 
point. 



^ 




UNITED STATES 



25< 




VERNON ALAN EAGYE 



Charleroi, Pennsylvania 



Moose spent a year at Bullis Prep and Allegheny College before coming to 
Navy. Being sports-minded, he enjoyed dragging girls who shared his pleasure 
in supporting the Navy teams. Not a varsity competitor himself, Moose, 
nevertheless gave his all for the company volleyball, fieldball and steeplechase 
teams. Undertaking hard work was something he never shirked, for he found 
joy in accomplishment. Possessing genuine warmth of personality and a fun- 
loving spirit. Moose seemed to enjoy everything he did. This enthusiasm swept 
him over all the obstacles of four years without diminishing, and infected 
many of his friends. 



THOMAS EDWARD EATON 



Irookhaven, Pennsylvania 



When Ebbie tossed away his cap at graduation he fulfilled a long held ambi- 
tion to become a naval officer. Ebbie traded his civvies for Navy Blue after 
one year at Wyoming Seminary getting ready for the entrance exams. The 
best place to find Ebbie was in the rack, taking ten before chow, or escorting 
his O.A.O. around the Academy. Conscientious and hard working, he made 
many friends with his easy going ways. His sports love was baseball, and every 
Spring found him over on the diamond working as catcher for the team. His 
greatest asset in life was the faculty for taking life easy and with this, and a 
true love for the Navy, Ebbie will surely be very happy. 





THOMAS RANDALL EDGAR 



Fort Harrison, Indiana 



Tom was an "Army Brat" who preferred the Naval Academy to West Point. 
He spent two years at Michigan State College in the depths of Forestry before 
emerging to enter the Academy- If you were to ask him where he was from, 
he would answer "all over." He had lived in just about every state of the 
Union before joining the ranks of the Boys in Blue. Ever since Tom was big 
enough to manage a ball and glove, he has been playing baseball, and he con- 
tinued his love for the sport as pitcher on the Varsity Baseball Team. He was 
both athletic and intelligent, but not one to brag about either. Tom was easy 
to get along with and well liked by everyone. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



257 







UNITED STATES 



JOE DUKE EDWARDS 



Bruceton, Tennessee 



Since Duke had lived in tin- South :ill his life, he was quick to show his pro- 
Southern attitude on anything to do with the Civil War. One could argue 
forever with him hut could never convince him that the South was not the 
bi si place in which to live. Entering the \cadcim on a college certificate from 
Memphis State College where he was enrolled in the AFROTC, Duke joined 
in various activities in the Brigade. I lis specialty was the Antiphonal Choir, 
lie likes to sing but was often heard to comment that only those in the choir 
appreciated his talent. Throughout his company Duke was noted lor his 
statement while on Youngster Cruise, "Wake me up when the ship sinks." 




JOHN JOSEPH EGAN 



. I slur in. New York 



Jack was horn and reared in New York City, \ftcr graduating from La Salle 
Academy, he did a short tour in the Marine (.dips and then exchanged his 
greens for the blues' of Navy, lack's hobby was ceramics, and this interesi 
rilled both his extra time and any available space in which he could stack his 
ha ml i work. It w as not always easy for Jack to tit into Ins uniforms after those 
all-too-infrequent leaves. \ fond appreciation ol smi oth music and a cheery 
word or smile for all. ate Jack's trademarks, his quiet, unassuming manner 
and perception will be an asset to any organization of which he is a member. 



JAMES WHITE EGERTON 



Louisburg, North Carolina 



1 1 in drove up to the gates of the Vcademj in Ins yellow Plymouth, made a 
deal with a car hungry Ensign, and jumped into the rigors of I'lcbc Summer. 
Since then, his smile and mild manner have always made him welcome in any 
group and have won him many friends. On the athletic fields, Jim represented 
his company in cross-country and steeplechase. He didn't drag often, but 
whenever he did. the Southern belle that he was dragging was always the 
queen of the ball. What was Jim's greatest accomplishment 1 Converting his 
^ ankee roommate into a rebel! All in all. Jim's friendliness and interest in his 
work make him a man well worth knowing. 






NAVAL ACADEMY 



DUANE CAMERON EGGERT 




Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



Coming from the University of Wisconsin, Dewey brought a wide experience 
and versatility to the Academy. A lover of fine arts, he enjoyed browsing in 
the library and attending concerts. Although he was active in many clubs, his 
favorite pastimes were singing in the Antiphonal Choir and working as Asso- 
ciate Editor of the 1956 LUCKY BAG. Dewey's most valuable asset proved 
to be his ability to take things in stride, which helped him star with ease. 
Preferring intellectual to athletic activity, he liked nothing better than a 
game of chess or a lively discussion. A quiet sense of humor, a pleasant dis- 
position, and a willingness to help have made Dewey wonderfully easy to get 
along with. 



MICHAEL ELINSKI, JR 



Wilkes Barre, Pennsvlv 



After many years of hard labor deep in the anthracite mines of Wilkes Barre, 
Igor found the Naval Academy soft. The switch from pick and shovel to books 
and slide rule was not hard for him and his ability to speak Russian was of 
special envy to many of his classmates. Most of Igor's sport time was devoted 
to the Varsity Gym Team. His specialty was the flving rings, and his skill was 
such that he succeeded in receiving many offers from Barnum and Bailey. 
Another of Igor's pleasures was wrestling, and he made an honest attempt to 
spend a part of each and every study hour doing just this. 

JOHN EARLE ELLIOTT Hoopeston, Illinois 

The favorite son of (Hoopeston came to Navy Tech after a year at the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, and a year and a half in the fleet. Some of his extra-cur- 
ricular activities included NA-10, Drum and Bugle Corps, Chapel Choir, and 
women. After he gave each of these activities their fair share of time, he some- 
times found that he was pressed for time to study. John's pet peeve was first 
period class, due to the fact that his early morning vocabulary was limited to 
"yes" and "no." His favorite pastime was a good party anywhere and any- 
time. John's natural friendliness characterized the easy going way he tackled 
life. 







259 






(^ 



HAL ROBERTS ELLIS. Ill 



Hazelh urst, Mississippi 



\ true son of the Confederacy, Hal entered tin- Academy after graduating 
from Marion Institute. Mthough he did not pla) any varsity sports while at 
the Academy, Hal- was a strong and steady member of the company's soccer, 
Reldball and Softball teams. \ hint to anyone who mighl want to get along 
with Hal in tin- morning, would he not to awaken him anj more than neci 
sary, and to feed him hominy grits and gravy for breakfast. Although Hal 
and Ins ^ ankee roommates didn't always sic eye to eye on some things, they 
all agreed with his policies of more leave, and graduation. 



WILLIAM WENDELL ELPERS 



Fort liranch, Indiana 



\ connoisseur of tine whiskies ami fast automobiles, Whiskey Hill, as he 
was affectionately known to his classmates, also gained renown by Ins ■ i 
successful efforts ar recovering our monthly insult from the inhabitants ol 
Robber's Row. in the form of advertising for tin LOG. But, Mill is best re- 
numbered lor his avid bur fruitless endeavors in the held of academics; a 
fervor surpassed only by his hopeless bur Herculean efforts at avoiding his 
most persistent temptress, his beloved rack. Never understood by members 
ot the fairer sex, it can be truthfullv said that Bill never fully understood 
them either. 




JAMES PETER ER 



Minot, North Dakota 



Jim was born and raised on the rolling prairies of North Dakota, several 
miles from the geographical center of the Xorrh American continent. After 
finishing a year at Minot State Teachers College, he packed up for Annapolis. 
During Jim's stay at the Academy, he was very active in public relations, re- 
porting football, baseball, and basketball games. On afternoons when PRC 
wasn't occupying his time, he could be found on the third wing squash courts 
picking up points for the Twenty-fourth Company. His ability to take a job 
and do it well will always be remembered bv his friends. 



UNITED STATES 



260 





FRED HENRY ERNST 



hitte, Montana 



After a year at the School on Mines in his home town, Fred found the Naval 
Academy more to his liking and so became a Third Company live-wire. 
Although he was always an important figure in intramural handball, squash, 
and basketball circles, each springtime would find him taking off at every 
opportunity for his favorite interest, a day of leisure and fresh air on the golf 
links. A dependable friend and welcome companion, Fred is destined to have 
a happy and successful future due to his agreeable nature, and the abilities to 
relax and enjoy life or work his hardest, as the situation demands. 



FREDERIC HEIGE EVANS 



Miami, Florida 



Fred calls Miami, Florida, Havana, Cuba, Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania — 
name it and he's lived there — his home towns. Appointed through the Naval 
Reserve Program, Fred attended Severn School for one year before entering 
the Academy. A sailing enthusiast, Fred could be found, during the Fall and 
Spring seasons on the decks of the schooner, "Freedom," with a cup of coffee 
in his hand. Heavyweight football occupied his spare time during the winter 
months. His favorite pastimes while at the Academy included drinking coffee, 
listening to dreamy music, and going on liberty. Suffering through the years 
of academics, Fred found comparative ecstasy during the summer cruises. 





JAMES ALLEN EVANS 



Bethesda, Maryland 



Jim's interest in sailing and aquatic sports made him a natural for "Canoe 
U." From his first knockabout lesson to his last yawl race, he demonstrated 
a wealth of practical seamanship knowledge. Before entering the Academy, 
he tried his hand at everything from digging ditches to being an ice man. 
But in 1951 he gave up these lush positions, turned down an NROTC scholar- 
ship, and came to rest in Mother Bancroft. With his versatility and extensive 
background to fall back on, Jim quickly adapted himself to the rigors of life 
as a mid. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



261 








UNITED STATES 



WILLIAM AUSTIN EVERETT 



Fayetteville, North Carolina 



Bill's military career started in June of 1 ( >5() when he entered Ins home town 
National Guard Unit. During his second summer camp training period, he re- 
ceived rlu- news rh;it he had been given an appointment to USNA. In order 
to learn more about the Navy Hill enlisted and finally entered rhe Academy 
via NAPS. Naturally quiet, Bill's main interest at rhe Academy was keeping 
up with his studies. Vfter rlns came physical naming, which ro Bill meant 
gymnastics and track. With an everpresent twinkle in his eyes and a smile on 
his face. Bill was one who was alwaj s welcome anytime, anyplace, and in any 
company . 




FREDERICK POWER EYLAR 



Aberdeen, Ohio 




Fred sp< nt most of his life prior m entering rlu- service in a small town on 
the beautiful Ohio, lie enlisted in the \ir Force, later attending the Naval 
Vcademy Prep School, before entering the Academy. No one who knew Fred 
ar the Academy will ever remember him as a scholar, for studies came hard 
for him. However, he realized the amount "I work he had before him and 
labored diligently to reach his goal. I lis kindness ami helpfulness should 
always be remembered by his classmates, for many were the rimes that Fred 
ga\<- up his free hours to insure that others had a good rime. Fred, and the 
phrase "true friend," will always be synonymous among the fellows he lived 
with at tin- Academy. 



ARMAND TISE EYLER. JR 



West Chester, Pennsylvania 



I ise's pi! - Vcademj days found him living in many different places, hut he 
settled down long enough to graduate from Episcopal High in Alexandria. 
Like most of us, Hse found his tour of duty ai I SN \. anything but a free ride. 
The best explanation was his belief that "all work and no play makes Jack a 
dull boy." lise's varied interests included soccer, popular music, girls (when 
he wasn't pinned) and primarily, sailing. He participated in all the important 
races including the long one to Bermuda, and was rhe proud possessor of a 
Royono command card. It can be said rhar I ise enjoyed and supported 
service life to the utmost. 



262 





NAVAL ACADEMY 



PHILIPPE BUN AU-VARI LLA FALES 




Monterey, California 



Phil is the fortunate type of individual who stumbles unconcerned down 
life's path, tripping over diamonds on his way. His happy-go-lucky attitude 
was an inspiration and sometimes a trial as life's plums fell upon his shoulders. 
Phil's standard commentary on life and any item of interest was — Fruit. His 
lack of allegiance to California irritated some of his fellow Cahfornians, but it 
might best be explained by the fact that Phil gets along anywhere. Phil's 
athletic talents were varied, but his forte seemed to be soccer where he ex- 
celled at center forward. Phil's weakness was young ladies, a letter being the 
only catalyst needed to make him worthless for a week. 






JERRY WALTER FALLIN 



Omaha, Nebraska 



Jerry came to Navy from Springfield, Missouri in the Ozark hills, but that 
was his only connection with the Ozarks. He had a definite distaste for hill- 
billy music, and swears he has worn shoes all his life. His love for all sports 
took him out on the intramural fields more than the three required times a 
week. His favorites were swimming, boating, water-skiing, and baseball. 
While on leave he also enjoyed hunting and fishing. Like all mids he was 
strongly attracted to the opposite sex and found himself right at home on the 
dance floor. A willingness to lend a helping hand whenever needed could 
always be counted on from Jerry. 



THOMAS JOSEPH FARREN 



Fall River, Massachusetts 



Tom came to the Academy via Durfee High School, but not before he had 
spent some time at Providence College in Rhode Island. None of us were ever 
able to figure out how he was persuaded to leave the joys of Horseneck Beach 
for the rigors of Plebe summer. He was a devoted member of the Radiator 
Squad despite his boast that he never missed a company cross country or 
steeplechase meet. He rather enjoyed leave, liberty, and sports, while An- 
napolis weather and the radio commercials of the local stations headed his list 
of dislikes. Blessed with a most determined optimism, he was never depressed 
with life during his stay here. 





263 




1 



<% 

a 




l»*» 




DONALD OTTO FAUST Brooklyn, N etc York 

Don, bettei known as Otto, entered the Vcademj from Ins beloved home- 
town of Brooklyn, where many :i sandlot was lighted by his brilliant playing. 
\s .1 Brooklynite,. Don was always read} and willing to tell the world about 
how good the Dodgers wire, and how the) were a lead pi pt- cinch to take the 
series next year. \' Navj rech, Don's athletic ability was a great asset to his 
company's teams, especially in field ball and Softball. His favorite habitat was 
the rack, and never let it be said thai he let his studies stand in the way of a 
good game of pinochle. Don « as one of those mids at \av\ who really enjoyed 
and appreciated classical music or a good hook. 



ALEX EDWARD FAZEKAS 



Cleveland, Ohio 



\\ admits to hung a gourmet of fine Hungarian food, an immaculate 
dresser, and a second \rthur Murray on the dance floor, hut beyond this, his 
inherent modesty forbids him from revealing more. His partisanship of any- 
thing Buckeye comes from his tour of duty as a civilian at Ohio University. 
\t ( >. I . \1 developed a great deal of college savoir faire. In tact few things 
have as much savoir (aire as did he on weekend afternoons, draped gracefully 
across his rack, listening to records. An avid golf fan, he often dreamt of the 
links, and the coming weekend on the course. One of his more salient points 
was the inherent ability to smile on Monday morning, even while facing a 
Nav P-Work. 



JOHN HEAPHY FELLOWES 



Tucson. Arizona 



Jack entered the Naval Academy after completing a course of prep school 
work at the Hill School in Pottstown. Pennsylvania, and a tour at the Naval 
Academy Preparatory School. Although he cursed the day the slide rule was 
invented and had a particular dislike for Newton, he didn't get into any 
serious trouble with the academic departments, and rather liked the Bull and 
Navigation courses. Studying law was one of his main ambitions, even while 
at the Academy, and he often dreamed of the day he would be able to do some 
graduate work in it. Jack was a fine athlete in almost every sport, and was a 
great help to his company intramural teams in his four years here. 




^> U N I TE D ST A T ES 



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264 





PEIRCE GEORGE FERRITER 



Portsmouth. New Hampshire 



Though Peirce claims Portsmouth as his home town, he has lived in so many 
parts of the country that he can hardly be called a New Englander. By a 
strange twist of fate he suddenly found himself in the Navy, and this course 
led him to the Naval Academy via NAPS. During the long winter months 
Peirce could be found each afternoon in the wrestling loft with the other 
varsitv grapplers. Experience and natural ability made him a rugged opponent 
for all adversaries. Peirce's keen interest in music varied from classical selec- 
tions to jazz, with the latter being his favorite. Peirce always maintained an 
even disposition and love of a good time bv eagerlv anticipating the next leave 
while meditating on the last one. 



ROBERT JOHN FESLER 



Moran, Wyoming 



A product of the Jackson Hole country of northern Wyoming, Bob attended 
high school in Canon City, Colorado, and spent a year at St. Mary's College 
before joining the Air Force in 1950. As a gunnery sergeant aboard B-29's 
he was based at Barksdale Air Force Base, from whence he came to Navy- An 
ardent sailor and Teller of Salty Stories, Bob's tales of the 1954 Bermuda 
Race, in which he sailed on the Highland Light, led many to believe that this 
event should be made an all-hands rate. He was also well known, however, for 
an uncanny ability to ferret out a good party, and could always be found in 
the midst of one at the Annapolis Hotel in DC, the night before leave was up. 





: 



THEODORE ARTHUR FISCHER 



Wichita, Kansas 



Anybody need a staple remover? Brass polish? Silver ink? The word was, 
"See Ted." If anybody needed anything out of the ordinary, chances are Ted 
had it. A lover at heart, he was the guy who bought more crests than an3^body 
else, but never seemed to have one on his tie. Although he came here because 
of baseball and with only that in mind, he soon became interested in dramatics, 
and spent many hours with the Masqueraders. Always smiling and with a 
quip on the tip of his tongue, Ted gained many friends throughout the Brigade. 
His easv going naturalness will always stand out to anyone lucky enough to 
meet him. 



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UNITED STATES 



PETER K. FITZWILLIAM 



Sheboyga n , // isco nsin 



From a long line of seafarers, Pete came to Navy lech, via Panama, Rio 
de Janeiro, and Norfolk. Starting his amazing soccer career in Rio, he came to 
lend Navy his talents, contributing a great deal to many of their victories. 
Ilis excellence in all sports, along with his warm smile and ability to make 
friends, predicted success in any field. Not confining his talents to sports, Pete 
was also very talented with the trumpet, and won a permanent tour year posi- 
tion on the N \-10. Mis mastery of Portuguese enabled him to become an im- 
portant member of the Portuguese (.'luh. Ilis frankness and warm smile will 
be a welcome to am wardroom. 




DALE LAWRENCE FJELSTED Northfield, Minnesota 

\tici spending some time at tin- Universit \ of \lmncsota and Northwestern 
Preparatorj School, Dale left the life of wine, women, and song and the land 
of skj blue waters, to journey to the hanks of the Severn. .Around the campus 
Ins diversions included listening to modern jazz, building models, frequenting 
that spor known as the rack, ami dragging. Ilis sporting interest rook him to 
Hospital Point with company and Battalion soccer teams. With four dark 
ages left behind. Dale figures he can rake on an\ obstacle. 



FRED PAUL FLACK 



Kansas City, Missouri 



From the rolling plains of the Midwest, Fred came to the Naval Academy. 
\ftei a taste of cxtracumculars and sports in high school, he decided to slow 
down at I SNA; he concentrated on Forensic Activities and the general run 
of intramural sports. Fred tilled the qualifications of a good plebe by "volun- 
teering" for cross country and steeplechase. With a National Honor Society 
background, Fred was determined to enjoy the Academy, and managed to do 
fairly well in academics without real drudgery. His attitude toward studies 
typifies his character; easy going and relaxed, with a knack for a quick come- 
back. 




266 





NAVAL ACADEMY 



DUNDAS INGOLDSBY FLAHERTY 




Newport, Rhode Island 



Although Dan had as many home towns as any other Navy Junior, he al- 
ways longed to return to the sunny shores of California, his last stop before 
entering the Academy. Naturally savvy, Dan had an aptitude for assimilating 
enough knowledge to enable him to wear stars. A connoisseur of classical 
music and pipe smoker deluxe, his room was guaranteed to be filled with smoke 
and the strains of Chopin and Grieg. Dan was equally at home in a classroom, 
a squash court, or a bull session. Usually of a serious nature, Dan also possessed 
a lighter side that made him a welcome addition to any group, especially if 
it was one in which a spirited discussion was going on. 




GERARD JOSEPH FLANNERY. JR 



Bronxville, New York 



Rod, during a tour of duty on a can in the Med, met his future company 
officer, and subsequently decided to further his knowledge of the sea by attend- 
ing the Trade School on the Severn. At the Academy, Rod distinguished him- 
self in many respects: the underaged belles he dragged; his unfailing attendance 
at early mass when exams rolled around, and his affinity for the cool amber 
fluid. Rod was noted for his drive and hustle in everything from intramural 
sports to bird-dogging in the Yard. Pet Peeve: noisy window closers. His idea 
of a perfect weekend: Wheels, women, and "Make it nice." 



JAMES H ENRY FLATLEY, I I I 



Norfolk, Virginia 



If home is where you hang your hat, then few men at Navy have used more 
hat racks than Jim. In the manner of all Navy Juniors, Jim constantly shifted 
back and forth and up and down across the United States, and even made a 
few trips abroad. After a year at Columbian Prep bracing for four years at 
Navy and enjoying the nation's capital, Jim came to the Academy. He made 
eyes pop with his physical prowess. No matter what the sport, Jim was out- 
standing. Playing Varsity Soccer he acquired the name "Twink" from his 
teammates. A large part of the time he spent studying, was mainly spent search- 
ing for the duty formula in Skinny. 





267 






RAYMOND JOSEPH FLEMING 



Merrill, Michigan 



Anyone who ever heard a hair-raising laugh resounding through the Sixth 
Wing, and then was shocked further by .1 piercing, yet somehow cheerful, 
voice of many decibels gloating over th< success "I .1 new practical joke, will 
remember Ray Fleming. Ray's delight in telling stories, especially \\ irh his 
falsi- British accent, added i" the life "I many parries. Reading was one of his 
favorite pastimes, and staying out of the red in the Book-of-the-Month Club 
well rook can- of his monthly insult. Scores of other lesser hobbies made Ray a 
personality long to be remembered for helping those around him break the 
humdrum of everyday life. 



JOHN WILLIAM FLIGHT. JR. 



Il,i erford, Pennsylvania 



After attending Phillips Andover Academy mar Boston, Mill spent a year 
and a halt' at I la\ erford College in his hometown. He enlisted in the Navy in 
'51 and received Ins hour training at Bainbridge. Before coming to the Acad- 
emy he was stationed at Jacksonville as an airman. Must of Bill's afternoons 
were spent either on I pper Laurence Field playing soccer, or in the wrestling 
loft; that is. whenever he could resist that compelling call to the rack. Bill's 
presence assured unique conversation about anything from the corridor hoys' 
"had times" and "good times." to the loveliness of round-faced Southern belles. 



DONALD THOMAS FLOOD 



\ • Orleans, Louisiana 




"How to Enjoy Life and Have a Good Time Anywhere or Anytime" could 
be called the story of Don's life at the Naval Academy. Always ready for a 
party on liberty or leave, and a hard worker during the week, whether it was 
academics or athletics, Don made a great many friends for himself here. 
Although a football standout in high school and junior college, he used his 
athletic ability to the advantage of the Varsity Crew ar Navy, with his oft 
season time being spent playing Matt football or company fieldball. He was 
forever proclaiming New Orleans as the greatest city in the world and was 
ready to convince any doubter of this fact with a few stories from his last 
leave. 






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268 




EVERETT WILLIAM FOOTE 



Akron, Ohio 



Forsaking the pleasure of civilian college, "Hoot" came to the Academy via 
NAPS, and the Regular Navy, where he had spent several profitable years 
discovering that his ambition was to live the life of a submariner. Despite 
minor difficulties, he soon proved to be equal to the task of academics, and 
soon set about gaining the reputation of a boudoir bandit, and a past master 
of professional knowledge, much to the irritation of the Plebe generation. 
When all the monuments have been erected in the yard, "Hoot's" doubt- 
lessly will have engraven on its chrome-plated pedestal the words of which he 
was so fond, "What I've gone through for a free education!" 



JOHN WAYNE FORBRICK 



San Rafael, California 



John came to the Academy after serving in the Navy for two years and 
completing the course at the Naval Academy Prep School. An avid fan of 
music, he spent much of his free time listening to the offerings of Shearing, 
Kenton, and Brubeck. A member of the N Club, John pulled the number 
Five sweep on the Varsity Crew team, which was no small feat when you 
realize that Youngster year he was pulling with six of the men who won the 
Olympic World's Championship Race. The bushy woods of Maryland were 
no substitute for the tall redwood forests but he easily adjusted himself to 
his new environment. 



PAT DUGGINS FORD 



Pie Town, New Mexico 



Pat, leaving his horses and cactus behind, decided that riding waves was 
better than riding broncos. He was graduated from Quemado High School in 
1948 and spent his next two vears alternately studying Petroleum Engineering 
at Highlands University in Las Vegas, New Mexico, and working for that 
lauded rail line, the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe. The advent of the 
Korean War brought Pat into the Marine Corps — from whence he entered 
NAPS, and finally, the Naval Academy. Here he returned to the broncs 
again, this time in the form of the side horse with the Gymnastics Team. 
Pat's ready humor and easy-going manner lent an aura of hght-heartedness 
to some of our otherwise Dark Ages. 



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UNITED STATES 



ROBERT MICHAEL FORSTER 







Bogota, New Jersey 



Bob came to the Academy after going through Bogota I ligh, and attending 
Brooklyn Polytech for one long year. Fortunately for us, he didn't lose any 
of his high school football talent, as his record on the ISO-Pound Football 
Team testified. He spent most of his free time sleeping, and dreaming about 
his drag for the coming weekend, or else reading the latest current events. 
Bob saved his real determination for sports, but he always managed to find 
time to get good grades in the subjects that caught his interest. Likeable and 
easj going Bob, as his friends would tell you. was destined to succeed. 




PAUL ROBERT FOURNIER 



Lowell, Massachusetts 



Red came to us from the fleet via NABS, with an excellent philosophy on 
enjoying life. He took Ins pleasure in other people, and seldom failed to rind 
nun ii al filling. 1 be way be pulled his classmates through Plebe and Youngster 
French is a fear winch won't be forgotten by mam after departure from 
LJSIS \. His prowess on the soccer field and the lightweight gridiron stood the 
lighting First among the best. In other activities he bore the brunt of mam- 
tales involving the Matatorium, and could always be relied on for a French 
Club after dinner speech for some visiting dignitary. 



BOB LAWRENCE FRANCIS 



Santa Fe, New Mexico 



Bob could always be counted on to make a sad moment j;a\ with one of his 
unpredictable remarks. Our. quote, "Mister America." unquote, was well 
known throughout the Brigade through his contacts as Vice-President of the 
class. Hop Committee Chairman, Reception Committee member, or am- 
group where a dependable man was needed. His way with the women was 
something to behold, and he never missed a chance to drag. A natural athlete, 
Bob enjoyed changing sports each season and always contended that no one 
could beat him at handball or squash when he really -.canted to win. A well 
liked man in any circle. Bob need never worry about friends. 



270 




NAVAL ACADEMY 



RAYMOND FRANKENB ERG 




Newport, Rhode Island 



Working his way into the Academy from the fleet, via the Naval Academy 
Preparatory School, "The Little Muscle" was a welcome addition to our class. 
A fine athlete, tied down at times to the books in a hard fought battle to get 
his commission. Ray liked football and wrestling as sports. He had time to 
work on the Ring Dance Committee and the Trident Calendar, also. Ray 
was living proof that good things do come in small packages. A quiet, happy 
person to have around, much of his attention was focused on the opposite 
sex. Ray was tremendously proud of his Naval background, and was always 
in there pitching to make the best he could out of everything. 




CARROLL RH EY FRANKLIN 



Fulton, Mi. 



Fulton. Missouri ("i" pronounced "ah") laid claim to our Carroll. It was 
after a year at Westminster College that he came east to the Naval Academy. 
Having been a Plebe football manager. Youngster year found him spending 
many long afternoons looking out for Erdelatz's boys. Still, he found the time 
to give his company sports squads a big boost in cross country and steeple- 
chase. He was also a good soccer plaver. Carroll could often be found with the 
gang at the "Little Campus" and was a movie fan from the word "popcorn." 
A good man with a great many fine talents, we were sorry that graduation 
had to be the parting of our ways until some later date. 



THOMAS LEE FREEMAN 



Kokomo, Indi. 



A man with natural drawing ability, Tom utilized his talents by putting 
out some terrific posters for the company intramural squads, and tutoring the 
Plebes who were unsat in mechanical drawing. His good speaking voice won 
him a job as a disk jockey for WRNV. Recognition must also be given to 
Tom's abihtv to concentrate; he liked to study with the radio on. His primary 
athletic interest was in football, and he devoted much time and effort to the 
Mighty Mites. The top item on his list of dislikes was smoke, so if you ever 
want to do him a good turn, don't exhale that EI Ropo in his face. 






271 






HENRY WILLIAM FRIEDEL. JR. 



North Troy, New i ork 



I Link decided at an earlj age to see the world, so he left the old home town 
and enlisted in tin- Navy. Alter .1 short Mediterranean cruise, BUPERS 
realized Ins potential and sent him to tin Vcademj via tin- Naval Academy 
Prep School. \n ex-boiler tender, In- decried tin- lack of a spring loaded, 
steam driven slide rule that would have helped in those last ditch stands 
against rlu- \cademic Department. I lis athletic prowess was demonstrated 
by his consistent poinl scoring in cioss country, and by Ins underwater record 
lor living submersibles established in the McDonough tank. 



NORMAN LEA HUTCHINGS FRITH II 



Pembroke, Bermuda 



Wlu-n Norman the Flea came to I SN \ from that island paradise. Ber- 
muda, he must have brought some ol its native sunshine with him. He alwa\s 
hail a smile and a bright hello lor everyone. \nv activity he worked with, 
whether rhe radio station. Juice Gang, or Sound Unit, was literally attacked 
by the Flea, lie loved to sail and the same persistence shown in other fields 
was brought to hear on Navy's class "A" boats. It gained him a spot in the 
1954 Newport to Bermuda ^ achr Race, where competition was very keen. 
Flea's tnends will always admire him tor rhar go an' getum quality which 
stood out in all his associations while at Navy. 




GERALD ALBERT FULK 



Decatur, Illinois 



Leaving the green fields and country roads of Illinois behind him, Jerry 
readily took to the sea and salt. One of the few of us with a real sea story, he- 
still proudly boasts of riding out a hurricane one hundred miles off the Virginia 
Capes while on sub cruise. Sailing on the \ amarie. swimming for the ol' 3rd, 
broadcasting over \\ RW , all were second rate with Jerry because his real 
love was squaring away the plebes. "Got your garters on. Mister 1 " "In- 
fantry dress George in three minutes:" Frankness and sincerity are Jerry's 
keynotes, and he held a ready friendship for all those who knew him. 



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272 





GEORGE MORGAN FURLONG. JR 



Pine Bluff, Arkansas 



It's a long trek across the plains of Arkansas to the sunny shores of the 
Severn, but Skip made the entire trip by way of Memphis, Arkansas, and the 
Naval Academy Prep School. After a couple of years at college and a tour with 
the fleet he found that things here at the Academy were different; especially 
the absence of women. Skip was a manager of the football team, a stalwart of 
the Chapel Choir, and an excellent student. He was as tacit as a rockbound 
coast, and just about as unyielding in his convictions about how to enjoy life. 
Skip was a serious guy at heart and his thoughtfulness, sincerity, and courtesy 
kept him on the top of the lists of all who knew him. 



RICHARD STOCKTON GAINES 



Montrose, Pennsylvania 



"Stock" brought us a love of cars and racing boats, a certain amount of 
electrical talent (he's a ham operator) and an ability to get high grades with- 
out too much effort. "You do the Bull, I'll do the Skinny, and we'll shake on 
the Steam." His varied activities made him a hard man to find. However, a 
hurried search of the athletic fields, the Radio Club, any bridge or chess games, 
any piano he could find, or the drag houses in town would usually unearth 
him. His favorite advice, was "Don't worry about the system — thev never 
fry upperclass." 





PAUL RAYMOND GAMBARANI 



Jackson Heights, L.I ., Nezu York 



A likeable character with a tremendous sense of humor, Paul came to us 
from the depths of the Dumbarton Oaks and three years of Civil Engineering 
at Manhattan College. He was a good guy to have around, if you needed some- 
one to drag that "other girl" at the last minute. After three years of cross 
country, steeplechase and an occasional tussle with the obstacle course, Paul 
settled down to his first love, the rack. Always a firm believer that studies 
shouldn't interfere with his social routine, he logged in many thousands of 
hours in the rack as a mid. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



273 








UNITED STATES 



STEPHEN GEORGE GARDELLA.JR. 



Ansonia, Connecticut 



Steve came to Navv Tech from the southern-most state of New England 
after he graduated from Fairfield Prep School. Steve worked ar his academics, 
but his thoughts were always on those wonderful leaves and the girls back 
home. Dining class hours, he enjoyed French and Youngster steam most of 
all. lie always regarded the Math Department as a hear trap tor the unwary. 
I le became manager of the varsity ISO lb. loot hall team, and saw them through 
three great seasons. The resi of the year, he expended his efforts on the sports 
squads of the 22nd company. He was a fan of the New York Yankees no less 
than of the state of Connecticut. 







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DANIEL TYLER GARGES 



Charleston, Smith Carolina 



A high school -diploma from Tokyo. Japan, and a year at Sullivan's Prep 
gave Dan his preparation for Vcademj life. Dan always had a word of cheer 
for everyone, and a smile that won him many friends. During football season, 
Dan yielded to the weight requirements of the 1 mi's and put awaj all ideas ol 

enjoying his Mom's pecan pies, which, among other culinary items, could 
easily seduce him. When it came to dragging, he was the rover boy who could 
always draw a prize from his hag of tricks. 



CHARLES HENRY GARRISON JR Poughkeepsie, New York 

From his home on the Hudson, Chuck heard the roar of thi Severn and 
answered the call alter attending Admiral Farragut Academy and serving in 
the Naval Reserve. A fine athlete in high school and prep school, he contributed 
much to his company's efforts in sports competition. I hough his knowledge of 
Shakespeare was questioned Plebe year, Chuck got along well in academics. 
His basic quality of sincerity plus a tine sense of humor made him a worthy 
friend and classmate. 







274 








NAVAL ACADEMY 



STEPHEN ERNEST GAUTHREAUX 




New Orleans, Loui 



Steve spent four years at Jesuit High School, and one at Louisiana State 
University before heading north. Anything less than the Academy could not 
have brought him to leave his beloved South. He took off his light blue uniform 
of AFROTC and donned the darker one of the Navy when an appointment 
showed itself. At the Academy, Steve lent his musical talents to the Drum and 
Bugle Corps, and a melodious voice to the Catholic Choir. Even on a foggy 
Monday morning during the Dark Ages, he would always have a good word 
to cheer up the troops. Whenever confronted by a difficult task, Steve could 
be counted on to master it. 




ELVIN LORRAINE GAYLOR 



Jacksonville, North Carolina 



After two years at Campbell College, Al decided that the Navy was the 
place for him. He enjoyed weekends in Annapolis the most, and would drag 
as long as the monthly insult lasted. The weekdays, however, he looked upon 
with horror. Always having good intentions for study, Al worked hard for 
even the smallest results. A natural athlete, he became interested in squash and 
in little time was an accomplished player, putting his skill to good use on the 
Varsity Squash Team. His never-say-die spirit served as an inspiration to his 
classmates. 



BENJAMIN WESLEY GEORGE 



Middleport, Pennsylvania 



Ben, the official Navy representative of the Pennsylvania Dutch, was first 
attracted to the Navy in high school. There, in a school play, he had the role 
of a skipper. After working for a few years, Ben enlisted in the Navy and 
entered the Academy via NAPS. When not dragging, Ben could usually be 
found either in Hubbard Hall, or back in his room listening to his collection 
of long hair records and lifting weights. Ben will always be remembered as the 
easy-going, pleasant guy who received all the CARE packages from home. 






275 






JULES JOSEPH GERVAIS. JR 



\ i ■ OrL an r, Louisiana 



Leaving his pre-law course at rulane University behind, Jules came north 
to Annapolis. ["he engineering curriculum was 180 degrees out o( phase with 
the libera] arts in which lie reveled. Hut with th< d< ti rmination and hard work 
that characterized Jules, he emerged with a good class standing. A hrm be- 
liever in physical conditioning. Jules was often seen working on the gymnastic 
equipment or playing basketball in Ma Donough Hall. He loved to spend 
afternoons reading or listening to classical music. But when the weekend 
rolled around. Jules could he seen dragging one of his main- female friends. 



WALTER LAVERNE GHERING 



lidinboro. Pen nsylvan ia 



\\ alt calls a farm outside Edinboro, where he was horn and raised his home. 
He showed his enthusiasm for getting ahead by breaking both arms in his 
efforts on the high school football team. Subsequent to receiving his diploma 
in 1948, \\ air was employed as an apprentice machinist by Gem ral Electric 
for a few years, after which time he enlisted in the \a\ . . Mere he served as a 
fireman before getting a fleet appointment to USNA. With his mechanical 
background. Walt had no trouble with Steam. Skinny, and associated subjects. 
Hemg older than the average mid. be was ever available lor words of advice 
or a discussion of " I he Universe and Dr. Einstein." 



JERRY LEE GIBSON 



.1/'. lemon, Illinois 




Jerry was 159 pounds of dynamite when he stepped into the boxing ring. 
He demonstrated his pugilistic talents by winning the Brigade Championship 
tor his weight division. Jerry had a number of varied interests, chief of which 
was dragging his OAO. He sang in the Chapel Choir and the Glee Club. He 
was a good violinist and joined the Chiefs' Orchestra for the annual perform- 
ance of "1 he Messiah." Jerry was also an active participant and leader ot 
religious activities in the Brigade, teaching a Sunday School class of local 
Navy Juniors in the Chapel. He spent most of his rare free rime in the rack. 



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276 





JAMES WILLIAM GILLMAN 



Rock Island. Illinois 



Previous to Jim's entrance into the Academy he had his fling at college life 
at Saint Ambrose College in Davenport, Iowa. Hailing from the Tri-Cities, 
himself Jim is a sound advocate of Mid-West football. Being quite a football 
player in his own right he quarterbacked the ISO's through three successful 
seasons. Weekends were his joy. If not on the girdiron or dragging one of his 
many queens, he could be found in the rack resting up from the tedious aca- 
demic week. All in all Jim has had a very successful stay here at Navy-Tech. 



MICHAEL ROBERT GLUSE 



Waterbury, Connecticut 



After three years in the enlisted Navy during which he advanced to Avia- 
tion Electrician's Mate 2 c, Mike decided to continue his career in the Navy as 
an officer. After his long military experience, Mike found no trouble adapting 
himself to the demands of the Naval Academy. His experience with elec- 
tricity was invaluable while at the Naval Academy and brought many class- 
mates to his room for extra instruction. Finding it easy to maintain a high 
scholastic standing without excessive work, Mike turned his talents to Var- 
sity Squash. After a year on the JV Squad, Mike advanced to the Varsity 
Squad and was a key man during his last two years. 






KENNETH HARRISON GODSTREY 



Ridge field Park, New Jersey 



After graduation from Ridgefield Park High School, and a year of prep at 
Admiral Farragut Academy, Ken came to the Academy via the Naval Re- 
serve. While academics were not the least of his worries at the Academy, he 
found time for his favorite pastime, the proverbial wine, women, and a song. 
A passion for Southern drawls (feminine), and "pah-ties" made his dark ages 
a little brighter. His participation in the intra-mural sports program varied 
from boxing to 150 pound football. His ready smile was a factor in Navy's 
attraction to the femmes. 



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iJ U N I TE D STATES 



GEORGE BISHOP GOLLEHON 



Delavan, Wisconsin 



Well known around Bancroft for rhe smooth strains ot his trombone. George 
was a disciple <A rhe modern forms of music, lie brought his instrumental 
versions to the X \-l(l. and his vocal renditions to the Chapel Choir. George's 
only idiosyncrasy was the habit ot' sitting on the hot radiator right after 
reveille on those cold winter mornings, bur In- will also be remembered for 
that nostalgic look that stole over him as he recalled the year spent in the 
S \E chapter at rhe Qniversit) of Wisconsin. Serious but affable well describe 
starman "( ientleman ( ieorge." 







GLEN EDWARD GOOD Williamsporl. Pennsylvania 

Wherever there was fun and frolic, there you were apt to rind "Goodie." 
tor he was endowed with a knack for enjoying himself and the company ot 
his classmates. Hut "Goodie" had his serious moments, especially around 
exam tunc. He cam< '■■ tin Vcademj after a three sear birch in the Fleet, ami 
his nautical knowledge was a thing to inspire awe in more than one plebe. 
lbs interests at USNA ran the gauntlet from the Antiphonal Choir to basket- 
ball and soccer, lie was a valuable addition to any sports squad, and will long 
be remembered as a sparkplug on or off the field. 



GERRY FRANCIS GOSSENS 



1 1 n us tun, T 



Equipped with the unique experience of having graduated from high school 
m Saudi Arabia. Gerrj spent a pre-academy year at Columbian Prep. His 
extracurricular time was divided among turning out sports copy tor rhe log. 
terrorizing the squash courts, and sailing over the cross-bar at the high jump 
pit. Having an intense dislike of cold air. Gerrv waged a constant battle with 
his roommates to keep the windows closed on the cold winter nights. Gem s 
genial nature and competitive spirit have won him an indelible place in the 
memories of his classmates. 




278 





NAVAL ACADEMY 




PAUL DAVID GRAF 



// orcester, Massachusetts 



"PD" entered the Academy, leaving in his wake, two years in the fleet at 
San Diego and Bainbridge, and a well spent year within the Ivy covered walls 
of Yale University. He first showed his talents behind the footlights of Mahan 
Hall with the Masqueraders, however this was not due to his lack of 
interest in the more physical side of our life. Occasional Saturdays found him 
hosting one of the many teams that came to Navy in search of a victory. 
"PD's" ability to best tough times and his sincere desire to aid others in more 
dire straits than himself, made him a friend of all who knew and worked with 
him. 




FRANK MONROE GRAHAM 



Dayton, Ohio 



After a glorious year in Hawaii as a Boatswain's Mate, Frank realized the 
original purpose of his enlistment, a career via the Naval Academy. His all 
around record, which included duties as varsity Basketball Manager, four 
years on the Reception Committee, and positions on the company cross 
country and volleyball squads, showed that his skills and talents were aswide 
as they were varied. "Cracker" was always pretty serious about his work, but 
still managed to have a good deal of fun when the occasion allowed, and a 
system like that is one good ticket for a great deal of success. 



ALBERT LAWRENCE GRANGER 



Ridley Park, Pennsylvania 



"Come on guys, how about a little smile?" This and his bent "schnoze" 
always got a chuckle out of his fellow coolies. Coming to us from Valley Forge 
and "Hail Severn School," he easily adjusted to the rigors of Plebe year and 
the art of dragging. When not writing letters or studying in the bag, Al could 
always be found over at the gym sweating off those fall liberties for the ISO's. 
Never a clutch man, the formation bell seemed to signify to Al that it was 
time to shine his shoes, get dressed, and clean up the room. Aside from his 
aversion to hillbilly music and snoring wives, he made many friends and 
took the toughest problems in stride. 






279 






JOHN CARLETON GRANT 



Detroit, Michigan 



Wayne University and Ypsi College, plus a few happy days at the Univer- 
'I Miami, gave John whai Mothei Bancroft might have missed. Noted 
for Ins love of good parties and sailing, John was at the height of his glory 
while doing both. VIong with rlu- other fine things in life, liis appreciation of 
a choice automobile is second ro nunc. Many long hours pounding the quaint 
cobblestones of Annapolis as .1 member of th< LOG staff, plus Plebe Wrestling, 
Brigade Boxing and company football helped r<> till his agenda. John will be 
remembered for off-key singing, hours in the shower, and Ins lovi "I lush air. 



GERALD EDWARD GREEN 



llammondsport, New York 



Indicative of budding ambition, Jerry \ aledictorian, Class of '51, 1 1 IIS 
headed west ro the University of None Dame. I lis first taste of the Navy 
NROTC was mighty palatable, so in the spring of 1952, Jerry decided it 
was Canoe U. or nothing. Academics being no great pitfall ( stars 1, he spent 
most of his time on extracurricular activities Varsity Soccer, gymnastics, 
Concert Band. Glee Club and the Photo Club ro name a few. However, he- 
did make study hour inspection on Baker Tuesdays, [f you could put together 
a cute little de-icer, a nice thick steak and a bottle of Taylor's wine. Jerry 
would consider that heaven on earth, for he loved nothing better than wining 
'n dining, plus dragging 'n dancing. 



WILLIAM HENRY GREEN 



Fort Lauderdale, Florida 



"Wild Bill" hailed from the sandy beaches of Florida, the land of beautiful 
women, sunshine, and strong men. all according to him. Bill was always a good 
man for a parry, and known throughout his company for his jokes and lively 
sense of humor. Dago left its mark on him, but at the end of Youngster year, 
the books went up in a cloud of smoke amid much rejoicing. He divided his 
athletic ability between Battalion football and water polo. Before entering 
the Academy. Bill attended the University of Florida for a year. He was a 
conscientious worker on the class Ring Committee, and through his efforts 
we were kept well informed on the progress of the rings. 



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280 





ROBERT MICHAEL GREENE Taft, California 

A good all around athlete, Mick could always be counted on to join in any 
kind of sports competition. He was a firm believer in keeping good grades, 
and was very conscientious about working for them. In graduating from 
USNA. he fulfilled his foremost childhood ambition, and next most important 
in his future are the wings he hopes to win. Mick's boundless energy moved 
him to helping others when he was able. His lively humor and good natured 
cooperation, combined with genuine leadership qualities form the basis for 
success in the service. 



ROBERT JAMES GRILL 



Phoenix, Ar 



Bob came to us, a veteran of three years of U.S. Air Force service. While 
at the Academy he participated in intramural sports which included cross 
country, steeplechase, and lacrosse. He was always on hand to lend moral 
support, when it was most needed. He possessed the knack of keeping a cheer- 
ful attitude, even when things were at their lowest. A member of Radio Sta- 
tion WRNV, the Electrical Engineering Club and the Newman Club, Bob 
has rounded out a practical education which will benefit him and the Service 
wherever he goes. 





DONALD LAWRENCE GRIMES 



Wellsville, New York 



Don has quite an extensive background with regard to the services. Prior 
to his entrance to USNA, he attended the Merchant Marine Academy and 
was a member of the Army reserve while matriculating at Alfred University. 
Don admitted his first love to be the rack; however, neglecting this love, he 
rose to be Advertising Manager of the Log. He also squeezed in time to make 
the Plebe and Varsity Rifle Teams, and to run company cross country. Don 
combines an affable personality with determination to carry him through life. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



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UNITED STATES 



NEIL FREDERICK GROEPLER 



Stony Creek, Pennsylvania 



"Grepp" came to good old USNA, after a year :ir Hilder Prep School in 
W ashington, I). C. He had spent two years in the Naval Reserve during his 
pre-academy days, and thus found himself right at home at Navy. When he 
w as not busy leading the 2 1st Company volleyball team to victory, his favorite 
pastime at Navy was playing his classical, hi-fi records. One of "Grepp's" 
favorite topics was his farming experience, for he worked on his grandfather's 
farm every summer he had the chance Neil's best trait was his friendliness. 
He always had the right saying at the right time, lie was well liked by his 
classmates, ami will undoubtedly be well liked by those he has contact with 
in tin- future. 




SHELDON LAW GRONER Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania 

Law, the model midshipman, came to the \cademv via the Naval Reserve. 
( )nce lure. Ins calm, easy manner made him man) lasting friends. Law, being 
a capable and natural athlete, always plugged awaj at Varsity Football. His 
spun and determination helped to mold the team into a hard-plaving, winning 
outfit. Most of the academics came easj to him, but occasionally he spent a 
little extra time on skinny. V conscientious student, Law's ambition and never- 
give-up attitude gave one confidence that he could be trusted to complete 
thoroughly any .task given him. 



RICHARD PAYNE GUEST. JR. Woodbur , New Jersey 

Coming to the Academy from Wyoming Seminary. "ka/.ak" put his ath- 
letic talents to good use for the glorj of the- Navy Football Team. A con- 
sistent and hard worker, he socked them hard both on the gridiron and the 
baseball diamond. In his spare time, he keeps himself happy flipping over his 
vast collection of Glenn Miller records and spending a good portion of his time 
with the femmes. It was claimed by some that he held the all time record 
lor SIR, bur at any rare his well rounded disposition and friendly "How ...' 
doin'?" were always welcome throughout the limits of Bancroft Hall. 



282 





NAVAL ACADEMY 



ROY MOYER GULICK, JR. 




Doylestozvn, Pennsylvanic 



A Marine Junior, Roy might claim his home as anywhere from California 
to Cuba. In fact, his longest stay anywhere was probably at the Academy. 
He was very proud of his origins; many a Plebe spent time for Roy learning 
about the USMC. Golf was Roy's most plied pastime, and he contributed 
much of this talent to various teams while at the Academy. He was also well 
known for his art work, making quite a few posters for the company cause. A 
movie in town, the next meal, and spirit for all the teams, enabled him to pass 
his four years with a smile for everyone. 




CHARLES CREIGHTON CHRISTOPHER HACKELING 

New York, New York 

Seeing the Navy at periscope depth as a white hat, Charlie, a big, likable 
New Yorker, nevertheless decided it was what he wanted, and came to the 
Academy after a year of prepping at NAPS. While at the Academy Charlie 
gained a reputation as a mean man with the boxing gloves, and was undis- 
puted company boxing champ. He also participated in Batt bowling and 
wrestling, and came highly recommended as a handball player. Aside from 
sports he was an avid reader, and went undefeated on the Batt debating 
team. This would all point to Charlie's being a Bull slash, which was evidenced 
bv the shovel he took to class. 



ALBERT GEORGE HADDAD 



Cambridge, Massachusetts 



Dynamic is the word for Al. Possessing keen insight and imagination, he 
never had a dull moment at the Academy. Think of the weirdest hobby and 
he has it. He did anything from eating up Ernest Hemingway's novels to 
building model airplanes and then burning them in Thompson Stadium. His 
greatest vice was his guitar, and his murderous renditions drove his class- 
mates wild. Despite all these activities, Al still found time to devote much of 
his talent to the "Blue and Gold" by his efforts on the track field. If you ever 
had the luck to be associated with Al, it was undoubtedly an interesting 
experience, if not an exhausting one. 






n 



283 






HAROLD AUSTIN HADDOCK 



Klamath Falls, 



Harold graduated from high school in 1948 and received His first taste of 
military life as an NROTC midshipman :ir Oregon State College. After two 
years, he decided th;ir the Navy was much n> his liking, so he enlisted. W hile 
stationed at Agana, Guam, he received His appointment and orders to report 
to Bainbridge. Vt USNA Harold specialized in company and Battalion sports 
until he joined the Varsity Sailing ream and became an ardent sailing fan. 
\\ irli a yen for sailing, travel and photography Harold looks to the service 
tor opportunity ro pursue these inti 



FRANKLIN RICHARD HADLEY CoatesvilU, Pennsylvania 

In rlu- summer of 1951 Frank hade farewell to the steelmills ol Coatesville, 
and launched himself on a career in the Xav\ . \trer a short hitch at NAPS, he 
entered the Academy and. throughout his four years here, proved himself ro 
be a stand-out both in the classroom and on the athletic field. Cross country, 
football and basketball were his major sports pursuits, although he was a 
"natural" in any sort of athletic endeavor, and in constant demand by the 
intramural sports managers. Next to keeping a good average in academics, 
the most important thing to Frank was keeping the ladies happy, which he 
managed with the true finesse of a natural born Romeo. His presence was 
desirable on any occasion, whether it was work or play. 




WILLARD HARVEY HAGENMEYER JR. 

Crosse Pointe Park, Michigan 

After four years at Culver Military Academy. Hill had little difficulty in 
adapting himself to the rigors of Plehe year. A staunch believer in extra- 
curricular activities, he devoted much of his time and energy to participation 
in many different clubs and activities here at Navy. I!is nor too well hidden 
wild streak, and his desire to see the world have led Bill to spend many of his 
leave periods traveling in both the United States and foreign countries. Not 
troubled by academic or Executive Department entanglements, he had time 
to give firm support to intramural athletics. 



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284 





FREDERICK WILLIAM HALE 



Arvada, Colorado 



Fred hails from Arvada, Colorado — suburb of "The Mile High City." 
After a year at the University of Colorado, he entered the Navy. Nine months 
later, Fred received a laundry number. Two years in the Musical Club Show 
gave him an outlet for his musical genius as a french horn artist. His ability 
to mimic provided his classmates with a constant source of laughter. A man 
of strong will, he managed to be true to his OAO during his entire four years 
at Paddle U, no mean accomplishment in itself. This unwavering loyalty 
makes Fred a man Uncle Sam can always count on to uphold his ideals. 



HUGH ELLIOTT HANNA, JR 



Scio, Oregon 



When Sam came to Annapolis from Oregon State College, he brought with 
him many gems of wisdom and a high capacity for learning. He derived great 
pleasure from helping those floundering in the seas of academics, and from 
reading the latest science news. The Juice Gang and Physics Club both bene- 
fitted from his quest for knowledge. Sam also believed in enjoying life to the 
fullest. His friends were sometimes bewildered by the passion with which he 
attacked a good book or a second piece of strawberry pie. Good-humored and 
ever mindful of the world about him, Sam was an entertaining companion 
and a true friend. 





STEWA RT WIGHT HANNAH 



Denver, Colorado 



Coming to the Academy from Denver, Stew was immensely proud of both 
his home town and state. As a midshipman, free time was spent playing 
tennis, dragging, or taking part in the inevitable bull session. Stew's interests 
were not only limited to extracurricular activities, however. His conscientious 
attitude toward the books, as well as toward almost every other thing that 
he tackled, was reflected not only in an above average academic standing, 
but also in the admiration and respect of those with whom he worked and 
lived. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



285 








*f UNITED STATES 



CHARLES JASPER HANSEN. JR. East Point, Georgia 

A citizen of the Sovereign State of Georgia, Charlie came to the Naval 
Academy on an honor school appointment from Georgia Military Academy. 
Much n> the chagrin of almost everyone else, he was a fond lover of hillbilly 
music. He tried his hand at a variety of sports including crew, sailing, and 
handball. Although he had ro rake twice as man} steps as everyone else, he 
could always be counted on for one point in that old wintei classic, steeple- 
chase. Charlie continued his good record in academics at USNA, having a 
natural aptitude for the sciences. \ truer son of the solid south could never 
be found. 




EDMUND EARL HANSEN 



Belleville, New Jersey 



Ed came ro the \cadcnn from tin- Fleet, where he was on the Navy Boxing 
team. He continued his boxing ar tin- Academy, where he (ought for the 
Third Battalion ream which won the Championship three years straight. 
When he wasn't practicing in the ring, you could rind him pitching for the 
company softball ream. Ed liked all types of music, but alter his Youngstei 
Cruise, I. arm American became Ins favorite. Ed was always looking for merri- 
ment, and his dry humor made him a hit on all occasions. I !<■ be< ame .1 terror 
to the Plebes, who soon learned ir was easier ro stay "squared away" rhan to 
\ 1 si r rhe "Swede." 



WALTER HANSEN 



I'urt Eu/en, New York 



Determination? this guy had it. Anxious and read) on the gridiron (a few 
concussions to prove ir . or maneuvering behind a ping pong paddle. Swede, 
as he is known by his friends, gave jusr a lirrle in r more than his all. Coming 
to Navy via Gettysburg College, this quiet, friendly guy just couldn't resist 
the many opportunities to enjoy himself ar Navy, so he took advantage of 
them. I hough very partial to fun, football, and femmes, his serious moments 
reflected a character that demanded both the respect and admiration of 
teammates and friends. 




286 




\z*z^ 




NAVAL ACADEMY t ^V * 



DONALD CHARLES HANSON 



£#*< Claire, Wis 



After two years at Wisconsin State College and a year and a half as a 
"weekend sailor," Hans came to the Naval Academy to find himself well in 
his element. Never one to worry "too much" about academics, he spent his 
afternoons working with the Varsity Soccer Team during the fall and spring, 
and with the Company fieldball team during the winter season. It is said that 
the only reason he went out for soccer was to get the training table chow. 
With his disarmingly mild manner and easy-going sense of humor, he made 
many new friends and never knew the meaning of extra duty. He was always 
ready to answer liberty call, but never before chasing down the mailman to 
get his mail. 



MORTON HOWARD HANSON 



Lynn, Massachusetts 



Although Mort's hometown was Lynn, it was difficult to believe that he 
didn't grow up out West, after hearing him play his guitar. With four years 
as a Naval Aircrewman behind him, Mort was offered a Fleet appointment to 
the Naval Academy, and consequently went through NAPS. The Naval 
Academy was just one more duty station to Mort, and it failed to change his 
favorite pastime of talking about airplanes, and playing the guitar. The fact 
that no one could feel ill at ease in his presence made Mort an invaluable 
asset to the Reception Committee. Those who happened to match wits with 
him found him a master of sharp retorts, as well as an interesting conversa- 
tionalist. 



LEON SYDNEY HARDING 



An Sable Forks, New York 



Lee, the favorite son of Au Sable Forks, came to the Academy after spend- 
ing one year matriculating on the Union College campus in upstate New York. 
The change of his stomping grounds didn't seem to cramp his style too much, 
though, and the quality of his drags reached a legendary status in Academy 
circles. Between bouts with the academics, Lee put his six foot two, 190 
pound frame to good advantage in company and Battalion sports. With his 
good humor and easygoing nature he made an impressive number of friends 
in the time that he spent here at the Academy. 






m*** 3 



1 




287 




fc& 






ROBERT GRANT HARMON Hempstead, Long Island. New York 

Since Bob comes from an \nm Family, his decision to enter the Naval 
Academy was a hard one ro make hut a good one as far as his classmates 
were concerned. Before he came to the \cademy, he attended < icorgetown 
University, and was an active member of the Naval Submarine Reserve. Hob 
had little trouble with academics, and spent much time with extracurriculai 
activities. When he was nor being heard on WRNV, he could be seen working 
nut on the ha ml ha 1 1 or tennis courts. I lis good humor and pleasing personality 
helped make our staj at the \cadem3 a pleas. mi one. 



LYELL FOSTER HARRIS 



Madison, Wisconsin 



After spending a year in engineering ai Wisconsin, Lyell followed in his 
brother's footsteps, and came to Navy lech. Wirh an emphasis toward study- 
ing and thinking about that certain gal, Plebe year passed smoothly. I he 
fall ol Youngster year that inevitable "'Dear John" arrived and many plans 
were cancelled. Lyell spent tour years watching the girls at p-rades from 
the ranks ol the Drum and Bugle Corps. He was the first one to laugh when 
things looked particularly dim. such as the Sunday night before a Nav p-work 
after a weekend of dragging. 




ROBERT HENRY HARRIS 



Tamaqua, Pennsylvania 



Boh came ro the Naval Academy after graduating from Tamaqua High 
School, and spending a year at Wyoming Seminary getting ready for the 
entrance exams. Consistently a star man. he found lots of time to devote ro 
rowing on the Crew squad and swimming in the Natatorium. Even his hobbies 
of photography and model building didn't keep him from contributing gen- 
erously of his talents to the Ring Dance Committee and the LUCKY B \< i. 
He could always be counted on for a good idea for any project, and the pride 
he felt for the military way of life was constantly reflected in his bearing, and 
the zeal with which he tackled any problem. 



UNITED STATES 



288 





JOSEPH WILLIAM HARRISON 



Attica, Indiana 



Entering the Naval Academy via Purdue University, Joe quickly proved 
his excellence in athletics and academics. As a member of the Varsity Track 
Team, with broadjumping his specialty, he won his letter and nickname, 
"Mighty Joe." Though track was his major athletic accomplishment he was 
extremely interested in all sports and was always ready with a prediction of 
coming events. Having been an engineering student before coming to USNA, 
Joe waded through the academics with ease, and was often sought to help 
someone less fortunate than himself. 



MILLEDG E ALFONSO HART, III 



New Boston, Texas 



Milledge Alfonso Hart, III, known as Mitch, came from a long line of 
Texans. The big grin and ever present handshake brought Mitch to USNA 
via New Boston High School and Texas A.&M. Before entering the Academy, 
Mitch spent the summers doing Red Cross work in the swimming holes 
around East Texas; however his chief interest during the school year was 
declamation. As would be expected from his desire to battle with words, 
Mitch had cradled ambitions of becoming a lawyer. With USNA laying 
claim to Mitch, he altered his desire and devoted his literary skills to the Log 
for four years. 





ROSS Rl EPERT HATCH 



New Orleans, Louisiana 



Ross was born in Mamaroneck, New York, but after sixteen years he moved 
to New Orleans. This refined gentleman of Basin Street attained an undying 
love for the Deep South as could be evidenced by his love for Southern food, 
Southern belles, and last but not least Dixieland music. Ross was a stalwart 
on his company football and squash teams, and on the other side of the wall, 
wine, women, and song occupied most of his time. He was probably the only 
Mid who could say "y'all" instead of "sir," and get away with it. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



289 








UNITED STATES 



DOUGLASS FREDERICK HAYMAN. JR. 



Shelton, Nebraska 



Doug's trip from the great plains of Nebraska to Navy lech was inter- 
rupted In a one year stay at the University of Nebraska where a never- 
faltering loyaltj to the scarlet and rlu- cream ol the Cornhuskers was instilled 
in him. A star football player in high school, Doug continued his athletics in 
company cross country, steeplechase and Softball. His good looks and pleasing 
personality made him a great hit with the members of the opposite sex. His 
quiet manner ami desire to do his best, coupled with a willing hand tor those 
that needed help, make him one of the most popular members of his class. 




290 



GEORGE CONRAD HEIDRICH Charles Town, West Virginia 

"Hugs" entered the Academy via Bullis Prep ami Charles I own High. 
Being very interested in the athletic program, "Hugs" became leading scorer 
on the company^ basketball team, ami also played Softball and touch football. 
He enjoyed occasional dragging, a frequent poker game, parties nl .my sort, 
and bits of time with the "blue dragon." I lis struggle with the fourth class 
steam committee left him with a burning desire to return to USNA 
Plebe steam prof. After his four year toui mi the banks of the Severn, "I 
has his sights set mi the "Wild Blue Yonder." 



as a 

Hugs" 



DUANE LAWRENCE HEISINGER Frt fornia 

Duane, more commonly known as Ibis, came to us from the west coast and 
if you ask him, there's no place in the world like it. Before moving East to 
Vi\\ lech he spent two years at Fresno State College and a fifteen month 
tour in rlu W Force, with a short hitch at NAPS, [fit is said that he doesn't 
stand out in a crowd it's only because of his height which borders around 
\\ hat he lacked in height, though, he more than made up in ability and 
personality, and he held down a secure spot among the top men of his class. 
Besides waging some rugged battles with the book-learning, Duane managed 
to keep up his favorite pastimes of sports, photography and dragging. 





o^.*^_ 



S* 




NAVAL ACADEMY 



ROY CHARLES H EJH ALL 




Glen Lake, Minnesota 



A veteran of two years in the Navy, Roy brought his experience and eager- 
ness to participate in activities to USNA. He loved music, and belonged to 
the Glee Club and Antiphonal Choir. Playing the accordion at company 
parties was one of his favorite pastimes. He was an expert pistol shot, firing 
with and managing the Varsity Pistol team. When not down at the pistol 
range, he would be found in the radio shack on the top floor of Bancroft, 
twirling dials or repairing a radio for one of his classmates. Roy acquired his 
amateur radio license while at the Academy, and hopes to increase his knowl- 
edge of electronics. 




ALBERT LUTH ER HENRY, JR 



College Park, Georgia 



Al came to the Naval Academy from the Sovereign State of Georgia. He 
was graduated third in his class from Georgia Military Academy, where he 
received an honor military school appointment to USNA. While at the Naval 
Academy Al was a member of the Antiphonal Choir and the Italian Club. 
Although he did not participate in any Varsity sports, he was an active 
member of the Batt handball team, and also played company soccer and 
steeplechase. In the field of academics he managed to hold his own with 
"Bull" being his favorite subject. One of Al's major virtues was his firm belief 
in good old Southern hospitality. 



JOHN ARCHIE HENRY, JR 



iville. South Carolina 



One of the South's most avid supporters in the class, has been John Henry. 
John entered immediately after completing high school, and successfully 
coped with all the academic departments had to offer. Public speaking was 
his favorite subject, and speaking or writing for the Bull Department gave 
him the chance to shine. Coming north to the Academy had some effect upon 
the frequency of John's "ya all," but nothing dimmed his eager friendliness. 
He always was first with a word of greeting. Plebe year was made a little 
easier for John, whenever he was asked for another old fashioned revival 
hymn, with "When the Roll is Called" gaining the most popularity. 






291 






RICHARD THARPE HENRY 



Ouantico, Virginia 



\ six foot, 165 pound, package o( good-natured playfulness, I lank has no 
trouble making friends and holding them. I 'is spun is catching, and Ins pres- 
ence "ii anj team is reallj appreciated, since he can't be disheartened. His 
natural co-ordination in sports, especiall) swimming, gave him many 4.0s in 
P. T. Vlong rlu- line "I extracurricular activities, Hank appreciated all types 
til" music except hillbilly, and spent many hours producing enjoyable listening 
on WRNV. Being a Marine junior, he lias traveled quite a bit, claiming to 
have crossi d the equator six times. I lis read} smile and friendl) manner will 
be welcome anywhere whether ir be a foxhole, a cockpit, or a wardroom. 



WILLIAM FREW HENRY 



/. West, Florida 



1-5 ill hails from the "Sunny Swamps" of Florida, known to the chosen few 
as "(liul's Country." Skull, as he is affectionately called by his friends, for 
obvious anatomical reasons, came to USN \ by way of NAPS, and the Navy. 
An all round athlete. Hill excelled in lacrosse, and was justlj famous for his 
"hot stick work" on the 1 hird Hatt. lacrosse team. He prided himself, and 
rightly so, on being a connoisseur of fish stories, females, and the fine art ol 
racking out. Bill's rebel yell will always be remembered echoing through the 
halls, and will be a lasting tribute to his loyal devotion. 




DALE COLLINS HERNDON Atlanta, Georgia 

Dale entered the Academy after graduating from (irady High School in 
Atlanta. \\ ith this background it is easily understood why his friends soon 
became familiar with his favorite expression, "back in high school." Soon 
after becoming a midshipman. Dale began an earnest participation in ath- 
letics, and three out of his four years were spent contributing to the feats of 
the 150s. Although academics were never a serious problem to him. Dale 
could not help blushing every time the first semester of Plebe Bull was men- 
tioned. Dale's keen appreciation of jokes and clever remarks made him a 
popular listener and entertainer. 



UNITED STATES 



292 





ROBERT THEODORE HERZ 



Larchmont, New York 



Ted came to the Academy after a year and a half at Cornell and fourteen 
months in the Navy. Since his favorite hobby was sailing, he was an active 
participant on the Varsity Sailing Team and a holder of a yawl command 
card. One could not have a more loyal and sincere friend than Ted. Even 
when things were at their lowest, he always had a word of encouragement for 
those around him. Ted was not a star student, but neither was he satisfied 
with just a passing grade. No matter what he attacked, he was successful, 
and no job was too big nor too small for him to handle. 



HARRY EDWARD HICKS 



Reno, Nevada 



Harry came to USNA from the gambling halls of Reno, a direct representa- 
tive of Harold's Club. He was the first graduate of Manogue High School ever 
to enter the Naval Academy. His favorite activities were boxing and sub 
squad, and his most famous utterance on academy life was, "I ain't sweating 
it," and he didn't. His favorite pastimes were girls, liberty, cribbage, and 
sleeping; while his proudest feat was, as he put it, defeating the skinny de- 
partment, four out of four. Harry didn't care much for E. D. and the obstacle 
course, or the reveille bell which always seemed to disturb his sleep. 





JOHN RUSSELL HICKS 



Wilmington, North Carolina 



Another of the large group who joined our ranks from Marion Institute, 
John charmed everyone with his Carolina accent. Living near the sea all his 
life, he took to life at USNA like a duck to water, and quickly became known 
as top skipper on the battalion yawls. Classical music was one of John's big 
loves, and Sunday afternoons he could often be found making like a sackrat 
while the finest in Brahms, Beethoven, and Bach poured from the phonograph. 
Academics were the least of John's worries, for he was real star material. To 
John we give our blessings for the best in his future endeavors. 



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UNITED STATES 



ERNEST CARTER MICHAEL HIGGINS Hopkinsville, Kentucky 

Mike, "Never-a-dull-moment" Higgins, came ro Canoe U. directly from 
li i jili school. Always looking for the one he couldn't find, usually left lliggly 
with his Ole' Kentucky jug. His interest in the good of the company was 
shown in his desire and efforts on company and Battalion sport teams. He 
i njoyed classical music, good reading, and sailing. Though displaying all the 
qualities of a Kentucky gentleman, he was a firm believer in indoor sports for 
week end entertainment, A firm believer in the good of man, and women too, 
he possessed the highest ideals of honesty and dependability, applying them 
from the hast to the largest task placed before him. 




RAYMOND WILLARD HILL 



Helena, Montana 



Following his brother Earl '54, Ray came to us in the summer of '52, 
anticipating a very enjoyable staj at I SN \. Ray's ^if r to the Academy was 
his melodious voice, which could be heard at most Saturdaj night hops along 
with the famed NEP-TUNES. Ra} possessed a variety of ambitions which in 
the future will lead him just about anywhere. He was a classical music en- 
thusiast, and enjoyed a quiet evening with a good hook. Sportswise, he took 
up fencing and. in a short while, was wielding a mean foil. With a good sense 
of humor and a Mean Biummcl air of his own, Ray makes for a good party 
companion. 

FERMOR WORTHINGTON HOBBS. Ill 

Rocky Mount, North Carolina 

\lthough \\ orth came ri^ht our of high school from the fair state of No'th 
Car'linah, he attacked Navy's academics like a Harvard grad. Endowed with 
plenty ol brains and having only Bull as an obstacle, he starred by determined 
concentration and hard work. His standing first in P. T. acknowledged his 
adeptness in both varsity and company sports. Never seeming to he able to 
find a job too tough to handle. Worth was universally admired for his stead- 
fast ability to do things right and well. His cheerful smile, readiness to help 
a triend. and outstanding capabilities put him right at the top of his class. 




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NAVAL ACADEMY 



EDWARD N EWTON HOBSON 




Boonville, North Carolina 



Ed was born and reared on his father's dairy farm in the tobacco growing 
country of North Carolina. Here he gained a keen interest in the outdoors, 
and to this day is an avid lover of nature. After completing three active years 
at the University of North Carolina as a member of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, 
Ed embarked upon the rigors of Plebe summer along with the rest of the Class 
of 19S6. Always a ready and willing helper, Ed has participated in many 
activities. He was a member of the Make-up Gang, Musical Club Show, and 
the French Club. Ed carries with him into the service a keen, practical mind 
and the manners of a true Southern gentleman. 




FREDRICK CHRISTIAN HOERNER 



Santa Monica, California 



Fred came to the Academy after a year at UCLA, and some time in the 
Navy. His first love was, is, and always will be, sailing. No one will ever know 
if he was avoiding Sunday morning formal room inspections, but he was never 
around for the usual weekend festivities if there was a possibility of being on 
the Chesapeake for a sailing race. Fred started gymnastics as a Plebe, and 
worked his way to the Varsity as a flying ring specialist. He liked music, 
especially classical. He spent Sunday mornings in Chapel with the Antiphonal 
Choir. When the conversation lagged, Fred always had a few choice words to 
add for sunny Southern California. 

CHAUNCEY FRAZIER HOFFMAN Washington, Pennsylvania 

After three years of engineering at Rensselaer, where he was a Delt, Chaun- 
cey fulfilled his ambition to come to Navy. His Plebe summer boxing feats 
brought him the title of "Champ," which was a favorite nickname. "Champ" 
quit the ring after his first successful summer and concentrated his athletic 
abilities elsewhere; namely the wrestling loft and the football field. One of his 
most famous deeds brought him the dubious honor of receiving a brick and a 
half after one particular Baltimore trip. His love of good parties, and the 
ability to help make them a success should be long remembered by his class- 
mates. 






295 






HERBERT FRAZIER HOFFMAN. JR. Ocean City, A / 

Mailing from < Icean City, Herb came to the Naval Vcademj I nun Episcopal 
Academy, where he had participated in track as a pole vaulter. However, he 
shifted Ins interest to sailing when lit- came to \nnapolis. In thai respect, the 
shift was a good one because he was a valuable asset to the Sailing team 
during his four j ears here. I lerb's easj going manner made a good combination 
with Ins quick humor, and won him man) friends. Like some <>l us. who were 
nc>r sold on the rigorous life ol the Academy, Herb looked forward ro liberty 
and leave with great anticipation. Quick, good natured, likeable, and a per- 
son whose varied interests made him well worth knowing, we were proud to 
call Herb our friend and classmate. 

JAMES ROBERT HOGG Alexandria, Virginia 

\lthough able ro qualif) an) Nav) port as home, Jim is originally from 
Crabtown and came here via Severn Prep School. Outstanding, besides his 
red hair and genial manner, is his ability to render a sincere suggestion to any 
problem and meet the trials of a Mid with a fresh and energetic approach. 
I hough not a hookworm, he managed to run par with the academics and dis- 
played a special Hair for the liberal arts phase of the education. A letterman 
in Squash, he was adept in all racket sports and actively enjoyed his daily 
work-outs. Popular with him were quick smiles and a knack for keeping 
c< illegiate h a berdashery . 



CLYDE GILBERT HOHENSTEIN 



Park Ridge, III 



Alter acquiring his pre-collegiate education in nine different schools, 
"Hoppy" settled down for a more permanent stay at the Academy. Being a 
Navy junior, he quickly adjusted to military life and embarked upon the 
duties and problems of Plehe year. Hoppy's years were busy ones as was 
shown by his extracurricular activities. These included singing in the choir, 
serving as Associate Editor of Red' Point and as an X AC A council member 
along with his duties as Log and Splinter representative. Perseverance and a 
broad smile are Hoppy's trade marks. 





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296 




VERNON CHAPIN HONSINGER 



Winchester, Massachusetts 



Chip, one of those rare individuals who finds time for everything, owes his 
success to a combination of hard work and methodical efficiency. Never one 
to waste a minute, he devoted the time left over from studies to varied ac- 
tivities including sports, stamp collecting, and playing the harmonica. His 
enthusiasm for sports, basketball and wrestling in particular, led him to spend 
many afternoons as a spectator, while his own physical efforts went to the 
Varsity Soccer team. Renowned for his infectious grin and dislike for Navy 
eggs — any style — Chip was well liked by all who came in contact with him. 
Best of luck and smooth sailing to a guy with the will to get ahead. 



FRED NYLAND HOPEWELL 



Ghucesitr. I \r~inia 



Fred came to us by way of Bainbridge and NAPS. After two years in the 
Marine Corps, he traded his green for blue . . . temporarily at least. Fred 
started early on his spit-and-polish career at Staunton Military Academy. 
From there to Hampden-Sydney; but the civilian college life was not for him, 
so he went into the Corps. Fred really hit his stride in the company sports 
program. His name was on just about all of the 12th. Company winning 
teams and the back of "Mr. Intramurals" B-robe bears witness to this fact. 
Fred's amiable personality and easy going attitude will always be appreciated 
by those who serve with him. 





JOHN ISAAC HOPKINS 



Brooklyn, New York ■ 



Among Brooklyn's many contributions to the Naval Academy were few 
who stood out as prominently as John. One could never mistake his football- 
player size, once having seen it, and John used it to good advantage. To hear 
him talk, one would have thought he was a typical Brooklyn dealer, but after 
associating with him for a short while, his actions belied his Flatbush twang. 
Football, in which he was elected Captain, and Lacrosse took up most of his 
time; but John still managed to enjoy his favorite hobby — puttering around 
on cars. 



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ROGER BIGELOW HORNE. JR. 



// fsi Palm Beach, Florida 



Prior to entering the Naval Academy, Rog went through his first Plebe 
year ar The Citadel. Perhaps rliar is rhc reason he was so adept at squaring 
away the Plebes here. Proud of the tact that he was from West Palm Beach, 
he never let us forget that the sun was shining there when ir was raining here. 
His activities in high school sports were carried over to Navy's intramural 
program where he activelj participated in company soccer, football and soft- 
hall. He loved parties and found that he could best express himself around 
a i<>\ ial bunch. 




DONALD LEWIS HORVATH 



and, Ohio 



Having spent two years in the Naval Air Reserve, Gypsj was no stranger 
to \.i\\ life when he came to the Academy via Bullis Prep. Bringing with 
him Ins accordion* and those favorite polkas, he was already an accomplished 
musician when he turned his talents to singing in the Antiphonal Choir. No 
letter man. bur quire an athlete, much of his spare rime was spent on the 
tennis courts, or in the swimming pool staving off tin- Sub Squad. I lis favorite 
expression, "Who wants fat ban. anywa) ?", showed his ready wit and good 
sense of humor. \ firm believer in ustmg whenever he felt tired, Gypsy 
claimed the rest gave him the ambition that characterized everything he did. 



ROBERT HOUGHTON Flushing, New York 

\\ itb fourteen months of Navy life under his belt. Hob graduated from the 
Naval \cadem\ Prep School at the top of his class, scoring a 4.0 on the 
entrance exams. In addition to the brains. Bob has the brawn, and almost any 
afternoon he could be found above the wrestling loft tossing a few barbells 
around, or in the boxing ring sparring with an unfortunate opponent. Bob 
was chairman of the Production Committee of the Class Crest and Ring 
Committee, and he possesses a strong liking for semi-classical music. 



298 





NAVAL ACADEMY 



ARTHUR KIMBALL HOVATER 




Doth an, Alabama 



With his sights on the Academy from the start, Kim spent a year in the fleet 
in preparation for the big day when he would finally be a Mid. Spring and fall 
afternoons found him on the Severn with the Varsity Sailing Team. Winter 
afternoons found him leading the Seventh's steeplechase team around Holland 
Field. Many of the Seventh's wins were due to Kim's frequent first places. 
Most of his evenings were spent writing letters to the OAO, and studying in 
an attempt to keep the grades up. Being a southern gentleman, Kim always 
looked forward to returning once more to the "Sunny South". 




WILLIAM JERRY HOWELL 



Arcadia, Louisiana 



Before coming to USNA, "Dixie" attended Louisiana Tech for one year and 
a summer term, and participated in freshman football and track. He was then 
able to enter the Academy via College Certificate. Although dates and argu- 
ments about the Civil War took much of his time, he utilized spare time by 
lettering in Varsity Track and being a valuable man on the Battalion football 
team. "Dixie" was noted for being always full of life and jolly, with frequent 
comments upholding Southern traditions. As noted by all his associates, he 
had high standards of character and bearing, and a smile for every occasion. 



LAWRENCE JOSEPH HUBERT 



Baltimore, Maryland 



By the time Larry came to the Academy he was well versed in the ways of 
the Navy, having spent three years as a seaman prior to his entrance. Larry 
was never one to let the Academy get the better of him. Being from the 
Annapolis area, he had many contacts with the "outside world." All of them 
were female and undeniably pretty. It was never discovered why the young 
ladies always found Larry so attractive, but it is suspected his addiction for 
fast cars, and his good taste in the finer things of life had much to do with it. 
His weekday afternoons were spent in the fencing loft where he practiced the 
epee as a member of the Varsity Fencing Team. 




V 





299 






RONALD CLINTON HUDGENS 



Ferndale, Michigan 



Choosing between :i seminary and the Naval Academy \% ;ii; ;i big decision 
for I bulge. Bur even after deciding on the latter, he never Inst any of his 
spiritual keenness. Working for the N \C \ and the Class Ring Committei 
gave him tiii.it satisfaction. Hudge always worked :ir improving himself and 
m the end discovered to Ins surprise that he had made ;i high academic stand- 
ing. Good sportsmanship was one of Hudge's outstanding traits and In- oft< n 
displayed it in r In- boxing ring. \ inn- gentleman, :i loyal friend and an inspira- 
tion to all that's I ludge. 



DONALD LEROY HUGDAHL 



Minneapolis, Minnesota 



Hailing from the land ol tin- sky blue waters, Don's favorite pastime ;ir the 
Vcademy was athletics, not only as .1 spectator, l>nr also as an active partic- 
ipant. I lut: followed very closely the progress of Ins own Navy teams, Minne- 
apolis basketball teams and the Minnesota Gophers, linn played an active 
and valuable role on Ins company's sports squads, served as company repre- 
sentative, and as an officer in rlu- Naval Academy Christian Association. Be- 
fore he entered the Academy, Don spent a year ar the Northwestern Prep- 
aratory School petting ready for the exams. 




WILLIAM SHERMAN HULL 



Honolulu, Hawaii, T. II. 



It was not hard to tell that Bill was from Hawaii; with his tanned skin he 
resembled a true "kanaka." He was an excellent swimmer and handled him- 
self equally well on top ot the water as one of the better oarsmen in the class. 
There was never a dull moment in his years at the Academy, during which 
time he displayed his ability to utilize his leisure hours in some worthwhile 
activity. His warm smile made him popular to all. and his willingness to work 
wholeheartedly on any job that confronted him. won the respect and friend- 
ship of his classmates. 



UNITED STATES 



300 





WILLIAM SCOTT HUNT. JR 



Asheville, North Carolina 



After arriving at Navy Tech directly from a high school back in the hills, 
Bill found wearing shoes his biggest obstacle. Never one to worry about aca- 
demics, he found time to contribute his all to company and Battalion soccer 
teams. His Tar Heel spirit went undaunted by the futile persuasions of his 
classmates from above the line as to who won the war. His keen interest in 
ships was definitely an asset to his store of professional knowledge. His good- 
humored nature will always be remembered by the many friends he made 
at the Academy. 



HAROLD WILLIAMS HUSSEY West New York, Neiv Jersey 

Hal came to the Naval Academy from the alabaster towers of New York. 
After serving a year as an enlisted man in the Navy, Hal decided he would 
like to see the other side of the wardroom door. He joined other members of '56 
in many of the cruise adventures around the globe that are still retold. But 
still, wherever he goes, he seems to return to New York. He was a prominent 
member of the well-beloved Chess Club and very active in company and 
Battalion sports. His quiet good humor helped many people to endure the 
Dark Ages that come at any time of the year. 





MU RL EDWI N HUSTED. J R 



Unionville, Missouri 



Buzz hails from Unionville, Missouri, where he graduated from high school. 
He got the Naval Academy fever about midway through his senior year, and 
went north to attend Northwestern Prep in Minneapolis before coming on 
down to Annapolis. Buzz participated in company sports while he was at the 
Academy and his favorite was volleyball. He also spent a great deal of his 
spare time with his favorite type of entertainment, music. He could almost 
always be found, pinned to his record player, enjoying a few of his well worn 
recordings. 



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UNITED STATES 



FRANK LEQUELLEC INGRAM 



Cincinnati, Ohio 



Known as "Luck," Frank lived up to his name most of the time. He never 
really sweated life :ir Navy, and academics didn't quite manage to throw him — 
he came close to a star Plebe year. 1 1< alw n s managed to be doing something; 
generally as though he were going to make a career of it. He tried to hide the 
fact that he was an athlete, by never going out tin anything twice. "Luck," 
with sports to occupy his weekends, never dragged much at the Academy. 
However, he spent many entertaining moments after awaj football games, 
making up for lost time, "Gee, that rack sure looks good." 




PHILIP DEANS ISAAC Randolph, Massachusetts 

\ Massachusetts man. Phil came to I S\ \ directlj from high school. Aca- 
demics seemed to he his major interest, while the P.T. Department was an 
obstacle that hail to be hurdled. However, during Matt, soccer season, Phil's 
athletic ability came to light and he put his talented toe to work. A good man 
in any hull session, Phil could conduct an) discussion from his favorite posi- 
tion horizontal. Definitely not the bachelor type, Phil gave the women a 
chance, hut none seemed to hold his interest alter a six months' trial period. 
Easy going hut determined in his efforts, Phil should be an asset to Uncle 
Sam's services. 



LYLE MILTON ISHOL Philip, South Dakota 

" I he Prince.*' the electronic brain with legs, came to I'SXA alter two years 
.it \ugustana College in South Dakota. Mis greatest kicks came from snowing 
the profs and reducing Steam, Math, and Skinny to kindergarten terms for 
the benefit ol most of the Sixth Battalion. He spent most of his athletic energy 
on the steeplechase and cross country squads, and also tried unsuccessfully 
tor three years to make the same sort of speed in the Natatorium. Never would 
Lyle admit to being much of a social cut. hut he did have his moments — you 
never could tell what lurked behind that grin of his. "It's fruit, really. Just 
take the sum of the 1R drops, and . . ." 




302 





NAVAL ACADEMY 



RALPH H ENRY JACOBSON 




Bountiful, Utah 



After two and one half years at the University of Utah, Jake came to USNA 
— only to find that Sigma Chi was not represented. He merged instead into 
the greater fraternity of midshipmen. With always a weather eye out for the 
more important moral and mental lessons at the Academy, he rarely missed 
anything. Peeve number one was Annapolis weather; number two — the water. 
It seems Jake wasn't an aquatic type, and he just couldn't be convinced that 
Archimede's principle was true. While here he played football and ran cross 
country, sparking his company to many victories with his enthusiasm. 




ROBERT HAMILTON JAEGER 



Chicago, Illinois 



Never able to stifle a roaring laugh or hide his big heart, Bob left "Chi" and 
the diaper laundry, his signal bag on the U.S.S. Leyte, and a tour at the Naval 
Academy Prep School to come to the Academy. Although there was too much 
dry land between Navy and Chicago to suit him, Bob settled down and treated 
his academics with savoir-faire. His best friend was the beloved sack, which 
he left each spring to spur the "Thirsty Third's" Softball team on to victories. 
The Navy has long had claim on Bob, and it is getting an ambitious, hard 
working guy. "Bartender ... a big orange!" 



EDWARD CHARLES JAMES 



Martinez, California 



Ed came to the Academy from California with a year at East Contra Costa 
Junior College behind him. From the first, he showed himself quick to assi- 
mulate new experiences, and he was able to cut down to size, most of what he 
encountered. He amazed many of us with his power to retain almost all he 
came up against. Because of this it was no surprise to find his academic stand- 
ing above average. During the afternoons his time was spent with company 
volleyball, cross-country and steeplechase. Throughout his years at Navy, Ed 
has shown that he gives to any challenge a great amount of energy and acuity. 





I 




303 







ERNEST WILBUR JAMES 



7 tJ.S.N.A 



New York, New York 



Ernie came to the V.uhim from that 24 dollai piece ol real-estate, popu- 
larly know ii as Manhattan I si a ml. and his ardent backing of the Yankees nevei 
failed to amaze Ins friends. It would be futile to trj t<> name all tin- schools 
that Ernie lias attended, for he had been enrolled in a good portion <>f all those 
on his native island, including CCNY. Before Ernie arrived <>n the Severn, he 
spent some time at both XI C, Bainbridge, and \ \ PS, as a h Inn hat, and has 
represent* >l both commands on the basketball court. Ernie will be remembered, 
iini so much foi success in athletics, or academics, but for his unmistakable 
crj "Hey, \ce," the trademark of a good product. 



JACK PETER JANETATOS 



1/ooj up, Connei lit ul 



"Ht should I" as well a gentleman of liberal education, refined manners, 
punctilious courtesy, and the nicest sense ol personal honor ." John Paul 
must have been thinking about men like Jack when he offered that standard 
ro posterity. Jack's quest for the culture of the philosophers and theologians 
couldn't hinder Ins ability to make and keep lasting friends. His quiet under- 
standing, and steadfast dedication to principles made him an asset to an\ 
organization. In the dead of winter, he demonstrated his running ability by 
showing his heels to everyone on the steeplechase course. A gentleman, a 
scholar, an unfailing friend and a reassuring shipmate . . . 



GU Y CA RLETON J A RRATT. Ill 



licksbur^ Mississippi 



Guy started on a military career rather early, by spending four years at 
I ennessee Military Institute where he lettered in tennis and track. After prep 
school. Guy spent a year at Vanderbilt University and then decided to enter 
the Naval Academy. While at the Academy he was on the Plebe and Yarsitx 
Swimming teams, where he did quite well. His pleasing personality made him 
well liked by his classmates, and his diligent application to the academics gave 
him a good standing in the class. Much of his time was devoted to extra- 
curricular activities, such as the NACA. lor whatever the future holds, Guj 
has prepared himself well. 






1 



UNITED STATES 




304 




WALTER EUGENE JENNINGS 



Youngstown, Ohio 



Walt came to us after spending two years in the Fleet. He was born in 
Youngstown, Ohio, and graduated from Channy High, where he was an all 
around athlete and student. Since his first days at the Academy, boxing oc- 
cupied most of his afternoons, and this influenced his entering the Brigade 
Boxing matches, where he was runner-up in his class. He also boxed for his 
Battalion, and ran steeplechase during the winter. A lover of polkas, he could 
and often did listen to them all afternoon. Walt, with his ready smile and quiet 
manner, won the admiration of all those who knew him. 



RICHARD STAN LEY JENSEN 



Gloucester., Massachusetts 



From the salty waters of Gloucester came Dick, who decided to enter the 
dull gray walls of Canoe U. after a short stay at Cornell (terminated by too 
much partying.) He was a real terror around the campus and athletic fields — 
football, volleyball, and softball — , but he never neglected the rack. Dick be- 
came famous Youngster year when he dragged a brick of the finest variety, 
who wasn't even rich! During Second Class vear Dick's theme song was "Wait 
until I'm a Firstie." All in all, Dick's whole philosophy of life could be summed 
up in the words, "Let's have a party." 





GUNNAR SIGFRID JENSON 



Chicago Heights, Illinois 



Military life seemed to agree with Gunnar since he spent two years at Culver 
Military Academy before coming to USNA. Beside this propensity for the 
military, he brought with him his likes for girls, sport cars and progressive 
jazz. Hard working in both academics and extracurricular activities, he always 
returned from leave with the best stories, pictures and later . . . letters. WRNV 
proved to be a natural outlet for Gunnar's musical activities, and he devoted 
four faithful years to improving its programming. His pleasant personality, 
purpose and ambition made him both a favorite disc jockey and companion. 



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(^UNITED states 



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ANDRE LEE JERNEE 



Ocean City, New Jersey 



\iuly entered the Academy as a product of Ocean City lligh and Wyoming 
Seminary. While in high school, he played football and basketball and was 
selected on the New Jersey All-State football team. However, injuries in his 
Plebe and Youngster years curtailed any future athletic ambitions. He thinks 
there isn't a place in the world like the seashore, and doesn't hesitate to voice 
this conviction. Underneath his pleasant and smiling exterior is a driving ambi- 
tion to succeed and a perseverance that will stand him in good stead in later 
life, lie has no particular hobbies but he always enjoyed a good book, movie, 
or athletic event. 




JAMES EDWARD JOHNSON 



Carrollton, Illinois 



Jim came t<> \av\ shortly after graduating from Carrollton High School. 
Uthough his contact with the Navj on the plains of Illinois was limited, he 
brought with him a strong desire to learn. By working hard, whethei it was 
academics, sports, or the 1956 I 1 Vk 1 BAG, Jim maintained a high class 
standing, lie established himself as a world traveler, during Second class 
summer, and entertained all who would listen, with his adventures. Jim's eas\ 
going manner ami sense of humor brightened many a da) tor a host ot his 
friends. 



DONALD HENDRIE JOHNSTON. JR 



Washington, D. (.'. 



Never fully convinced that the era ol rail and steam were actualities, Don 
spent many long hours rowing with the Crew learn. Yet he was never too busy 
to stop and put in a good word. After sampling Navy life as an N'ROIC 
student he turned to I SN \ as a means of going up in the world. For four years 
he debated the wisdom of this move. Mis pet gripes were money (rather the 
lack of it . food, and girls, there never seeming to he enough to go around. I In 
scarcities of money and girls speak for themselves, and as for food— any 
starving Plebe from Don's table will vouch for his capacity. 




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NAVAL ACADEMY 



DONALD WHAYNE JOH NSTON 




Antonio, Texas 



Don came to the Naval Academy after serving with the Ninth Division, 
U.S. Army. He was soon to make a name for himself in gymnastics, working 
on the parallel bars. Don's other interests were traveling through South 
America and Europe during the summer months. In the winter he devoted 
his free time to sailing, photography, liberty after the football games, and an 
occasional hop. Ninety-nine per cent of the time, Don was as chivalrous as a 
17th century knight; the other one per cent he was busy debating Navy 
issues with his wives. 




JERRY RAYMOND JOHNSTON 



Wichita, Ka 



Although Jerry came from Kansas, one might guess, and rightly so, from 
his boisterous personality, that he was originally a Texan. Craving the roll of 
a ship and the salt spray, our Midwesterner quickly became an enthusiastic 
mariner. His eagerness to play lacrosse often prompted him to race from his 
defensive position down the field and score. Jerry met and conquered the aca- 
demics with a cool equanimity, but he wasn't quite as smooth in his calculation 
and predictions of the opposite sex. One might hear him bellow in agony when 
the morning mail disclosed that he had two drags for the coming weekend. 



DARRELL EUGENE JON ES 



Salt Lake City, Utah 



After spending two years at the University of Utah, Darrell boarded the 
weekly stage and disembarked at Navy. Being a savvy man from the start, 
he found the academic life at Navy no strain, and sported gold stars every 
year. Most of Darrell's liberty was spent with the OAO. He did find time, 
however, to lend his talents to the Battalion tennis team, steeplechase team 
and, occasionally, the sub squad. Frequently Darrell could be heard in a disc 
jockey capacity over WRNV, playing records for the Brigade. Study hours 
were spent counting days until graduation and keeping his wives ofFthe tree. 
Many a winter day, Darrell bemoaned the lack of mountains and skiing in 
Maryland. 






307 





JERRY ELMER JONES 



Sua Juan, Puerto Ri 



Jerry has moved about so much as a Navy Junior thai merely classing him 
.is a Southerner is sufficiently accurate. Having lived in so many places has 
instilled the roving spirit in him, and he dislikes having to remain in one spot 
loci long. Academics have never been ;i source ol concern for him except when 
an occasional grade slipped below rlu- star mark, lie lias therefore had lots of 
rime ro pursue liis hobbies, chief!} photography. \lso high on his list ol things 
tii do is reading, [*o keep in shape between hooks, he not infrequently re- 
sorted to rlu vertical displacement ol iron weights. 



ROBERT DUGGAN JONES. JR. R, ading, Pennsylvania 

Striding in from Pennsylvania's beer and pretzel city, via Penn State I ni- 
versity, Boh spent most of his Plebe year reminiscing about the good old col- 
lege days. Voungster year found him coming into Ins own as a sack-rat 
striker, and an available fourth for bridge. Hob was a habitual offender as a 
member ol the Flying Squadron. I his seemed to satisfy him as far as endeavors 
into the athletic field went. Mis < ) \< > old us his only true love was a double 
order of spaghetti and meat halls, four years of Navy did not dim Ins ever- 
ready sense of humor. 



HENRY MICHAEL JORDAN 



Hartford, Connecticut 



From his home in Hartford, Connecticut. Hank came to the Academy after 
serving in the fleet and attending the Naval Academy Preparatory School at 
Bainbridge. Maryland. After hours, when he wasn't participating in crew or 
company sports, you would find him at a piano with a never-ending supply ol 
music. His ability at the piano was only surpassed by his ability to create the 
immediate friendship of all those who came in contact with him. Known also 
for his helping hand, it was soon realized that no gathering, large or small, 
was complete without his attendance and active participation. 




UNITED STATES 







JAMES JOSEPH K AM P . JR. 



South Pasadena, California 



After one year at the University of Southern California where he was a 
member of Acacia, Jim came to the Academy. He was a big boy and must 
have liked boats, because he went right over to the boathouse Plebe summer 
and started pulling one of Navy's oars. Beside Crew, Jim found time for some 
Reception Committee work, pulling down his share of the marks, and writing 
to that certain Miss. He was, however, always anxious to get home where 
the sun would brighten up that red hair even more. Appearing as a pleasant 
person, he soon proves that the first impressions are correct. 



JOHN KARAS 



Duluth, Minnesota 



A native of Duluth "CC" came to the Academy by way of Duluth Central 
High School and the University of Minnesota. During his high school days 
"CC" was a member of the tennis team and also an excellent student. After 
coming to the Academy, he carried on in both of these fields very well. After 
a brief sojourn on the Plebe Soccer team "CC" went to the JV's and on to the 
Varsity soccer team for two years service. On the academic side, his sports 
participation did not keep him from doing well in his studies. He was an 
essentially quiet person whose modesty and ever present humor helped him 
to be a valuable asset to his classmates, even when the going got a little rough. 





RICHARD HENRY KAUFFMAN 



Sidney, Ohio 



It wasn't unusual to see "Little Al," as he was called by his classmates, 
expounding on the merits of Ohio while the Buckeye battle cry was being 
sounded forth, to remind us of the short while that he spent at Ohio State 
University. Photography took up most of his spare time at the Academy, 
but when he wasn't in the darkroom, he could be found in the rack or at the 
Chapel, practicing with the Choir. Capable of being run to the limit of any- 
one's ability, he was often the good natured butt of many practical jokes. With 
never an unkind word for anyone, Al made those four years a heck of a lot 
shorter, and the system appear almost as good as home. 



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UNITED STATES 



JAMES GEORGE KAUTZ 



Lodi, California 



A midwesterner with western ways, Jim was horn in Lyman, Nebraska 
but claims California as his home. Known for clear, deliberate thinking, his 
level-headedness is made even more obvious by his prominent lack of hair. 
By no means a stay-at-home, Jim knows how ro make the most of his liberty. 
It you like loud, fast music, just follow him. Ibis should seem odd for one 
who has spent eighteen years on a farm, bur they're different in California. 
All is not play with Jim. however, lie knows when to be serious and how to 
work, and work hard, and hi' is not afraid to get his hands dirty. He loves 
sports and has no trouble in making friends, male or female. A good man to 
have around ! 




ARTHUR EDWIN KEEGAN Jersey City. New Jersey 

Hailing from the ( iarden State, \i i cami to Navj via Xavier High School, 
in downtown Manhattan, where he received his first taste of, and desire for 
the military life. Although he came here straight from high school, by hard 
work and concentration he conquered academics with plenty of room for 
stars. In the extracurricular hue, he centered his activities in the Musical 
Club Shows, rlu Glee Club, and the Chapel Choir. Although often otherwise 
occupied, he was always readj to enjoj the company o) a good looking femme 
should there be one handy. 

ROBERT MONTEITH KELLER Coventry. Connecticut 

Hob had a big job, tilling his father's well known Navy shoes, when he 
entered the Academy. Hob saw a good bit of the world while his dad changed 
stations, but settled down long enough to graduate from Manchester High 
School in Connecticut. Hob excelled in Varsity Soccer. Choir. Glee Club, and 
even found time to put in a little work on the LUCKY HAG. Second to the 
Navy, Hob's greatest love was working for people. He was an active member 
of the NACA, and spent part of his summers working at a Y camp. Never 
to be forgotten are bis natural abilities, earnest effort, generosity, and his 
interest in others. 



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NAVAL ACADEMY 



JOHN DANIEL KELLY 




Teaneck, New Jersey 



Jack came to the Academy with a year of background in the NROTC at 
Villanova University, where he was studying to be an engineer. Being a true 
Irishman, Jack believed in keeping smiling eyes and an optimistic outlook. 
Famous for his booming voice, he had no trouble in making himself heard. 
Jack appropriated much of his time to such various activities as the Newman 
Club, Choir, company squash, and steeplechase. But the most important 
activity that he participated in was helping his classmates, at any time of the 
day, solve any problems they had, scholastically or otherwise. 




FRANK BENTON KELSO, II 



Fayetteville, Tennessee 



After spending one year at the University of the South, Frank packed his 
bags and left Fayetteville, destined for USNA. Although he found the "sys- 
tem" rather shocking, Frank was never one to complain. Spring and fall found 
him on the golf links where he could never find enough time to practice. 
Always industrious and jovial, he possessed the attributes of a good leader 
and the ability to make friends everywhere. That he was a Red Mike, can 
easily be attested by the mates who delivered that letter every day, and by 
the anticipation that was shown before those wonderful weekends. 



ROBERT DONALD KEMPER Shelbyville, Kentucky 

Bob, ever faithful to his "Old Kentucky Home," came to the Naval Acad- 
emy after ten months in the Navy. However, it wasn't until Youngster 
cruise that he went to sea, because his time in the Navy was divided between 
Great Lakes and the Naval Academy Prep School at Bainbridge. Bob never 
let studies interfere with his love for sports and music. In fact, he could 
usually be found on one of the athletic fields engaged in whatever sport was 
in season, or listening to music by his favorite composers. His spirit was 
seldom dimmed and he could always be called upon to lead in a song or cheer 
when the occasion presented itself. 






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GEORGE WARREN KENASTON 



Shoshone, Idahi, 



Idaho born and proud of ir, "Casey" spent .1 yeai .it [daho State in en- 
gineering before he found Ins waj to the Academy. Congenial and constantly 
smiling, his sense of humor showed up everywhere including tin- boxing ring, 
the softball diamond and the lightweight Co. football field. Ills love for read- 
ing and good music was augmented bj Ins desire to travel, which was lulhlled 
by using ever) mode of transportation from walking to flying. When not 
engrossed in Ins texts, or working out in rlu- gym, ( as. \ u ;is apt to be found 
with a faraway look, dreaming of faraway places and faraway ^i rls. 



DON ELLIOTT KENNEDY 



Slat,- 11 Island. New York 



"Hey, Marine!" I his cry echoed through rlu- Fifth Wing whi n< vei anyone 
was seeking Don's help. From rlu- Marines, through Bainbridge, to Nav} 
lech, came our Sraren Island native. Bidding farewell to General "Chesty" 
Puller, and the I bird Marine Brigade after I" months. Don substituted his 
trusty M-l lor his not so trusty slipstick and trig tables, to take up residence 
on the shores of the Severn. Academies proved ro be lirrle competition for 
Don. since he had spent 1 and ' ■, years ar Wagner College. Athletics and 
liberty proved ro be Don's main hobbies, ami he excelled at both. As a devour 
company athlete, he was a mainstay on most of the "Terrible Twelfth's" 
championship squads. 




JOHN HENRY KINERT 



Alexandria, Virginia 



Jack, the red-headed one. came to Navy lech with a large shot of "blue 
and gold." A year of college life at George Washington University gave him 
a real jump on his classmates, academically speaking. Afrer giving Ray 
Swartz' boys a real run for their money in rhe wrestling lofr. Jack finally 
decided the rope climb was his specialty. Much hard work on this event gave 
him an excellent build which attracted many beautiful young companions of 
the fair sex. Among his extracurricular activities was the position of business 
manager of Reef Points, a job he ably carried out. But oh, those monthly- 
board meetings! 



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312 





BEN JACK KINNEY 



Austin, Texas 



\\ ith two and a half notches carved on his slide rule as an architectural 
engineer and a Phi Gam at the University of Texas. Ben Jack decided to 
leave his home deep in the heart of Texas and give the Navy a try. After 
getting accustomed to the absence of college life, he soon fell right into the 
Navy swing of things, adding to the esprit de corps of the Brigade as a three 
year letterman on the Varsity Cheerleadmg Squad. Although a veteran hand- 
ball player, leading his battalion to several undefeated seasons, his first love 
lay in the field of music. Quite frequently his guitar could be heard with the 
NA-10, his voice heard with the Neptunes, and his dancing seen at the 
Musical Clubs' shows. 



JOHN HENRY Kl RKPATRICK 



Bessemer, Alabai 



This ardent rebel came to USNA via the U. S. Air Force. Although he 
never lost his love for the Air Force, Kirk managed to fit into the Navv life 
at Bancroft quite well, and compiled an admirable record. Most of his athletic 
efforts were devoted to fencing and he was on the varsity for three years. In 
spite of his many hours in the fencing loft, he still found time to play lacrosse 
on the Plebe and Batt teams. Kirk probably set some sort of a record for 
never having turned down an offer for a bridge game in four years. His witty 
spirit and friendly nature made him countless friends, and a favorite with the 
drags. 



MELVIN ARTHUR KLEIN 



Rochester, New York 



Mel joined the ranks of '56 via an honor school appointment obtained at 
Manlius Military Academy. His fine record there left him well prepared for 
academics at USNA, and he continued to swing a mean slide rule while at the 
Academy, being a near star man. Since he attended Manlius for four years, 
he found little difficulty in adjusting himself to Navy's military society. In 
sports Mel excelled in intramural crew and basketball and was an enthusiastic 
football fan. If there was anything dear to his heart, it was Navy football 
and Rochester. He has great interest in the military services and has all the 
attributes of being a fine officer. 



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CLOYD HOUSTON KLINGENSMITH 



Massillon, Ohio 



Rick came to the Chesapeake country and the Naval Academy after two 
years in the Marine Corps and a short session at NAPS. His chief pastime 
at I SNA had to do with a spanking breeze and a trim yacht, and culminated 
in a trip to Bermuda during second class summer. < >n the weekends that he 
wasn't sailing Rick could usually be found in the room writing letters and 
listening to records, or enjoying another favorite pastime in the form of 
dragging. Rick's abilit) to quickly adapt himself to changing situations, and 
his mature judgment gained many friends for him, and made him a valuable 
.ism r to his company. 




CHARLES EARL KNETTLES 



North Hollywood, California 



Chuck came to I S\ \ from Southern California, the land ol sunshine and 
beautiful women. Prior to four years ol formations and signal drills, he at- 
tended Valley Junior College. Southern Cal, and was a weekend warrior with 
the Naval Reserve. He was a member of the Sigma Chi Fraternity, and was 
very active in gymnastics and track both before and during his stay at 
Annapolis. Chuck thought that jazz and Dixieland couldn't he hear, and his 
record collection attained sizable proportions. Chuck was active in W'RNV, 
The Trident Society, and tin- NACA, during his tour of duty at L'SNA. 



LEO JOHN KOERKENMEIER Tipton, Missouri 

When Kirk was just a little lad hack in I ipton. he frequented his school 
librarv (pure regularly. It was during one such visit that he accidently knocked 
an encyclopedia from the shell and ir ironically tell open to the page de- 
scribing the Naval Vcademj . !• rom that moment it was only a matter of time— 
rime to be spent in the Navy and at N VPS until Kirk realized his ambition 
to attend the Naval Academy. His remarkable sense of humor, cheerful 
outlook, ami military bearing charmed many a lass. His conscientious 
effort to do and look his best at whatever he attempted is indicative of his 
positive outlook on life. 




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NAVAL ACADEMY 



RAYMOND MICHAEL KOSTESKY 




Yonkers, New York 



Ray's philosophy of "no strain, no pain, and no stars," concerned only 
Academics, as he ripped into other phases of life at Navy with vigor and 
enthusiasm. Ray came to Navy after two years in the NROTC program at 
Columbia University and breezed through most of the subjects, finding time 
for a large correspondence, company sports, and choir. Almost everyone ex- 
perienced periods of gloom and despair during our four years stay at the 
Academy, but not so with Ray. His shining personality and good spirits made 
him an asset in any group. Now a member of the great service team, Ray's 
sincerity and alertness will undoubtedly carry him to the top. 




SERAPHEIM DEMETRIOS KOUTAS 



Royal Oak, Michigan 



From the automobile center of the world came likeable Serapheim, better 
known as Sam to his many friends. Sam spent his younger days at Royal Oak 
High School, and also put in a semester at the University of Michigan. Three 
more years were put in at Wayne University in Detroit before he decided to 
come to the Academy. During his four years at the Academy, Sam's quick 
wit and impersonations enabled him to be the life of many a party. As far as 
sports were concerned, Sam hardly let a day pass without getting a workout 
in the swimming pool. Besides his comic talents and questionable swimming 
abilities, he possesses a persistency and a capacity for hard work. 

THOMAS RAYMOND KRIEGER Coronado, California 

Debonair and continental, Krieg first hung up the civvies and donned the 
double breasted blue blazer with the conservative cut, in June of 1952. A 
Cahfornian by desire, he was, of course, used to nothing but sunshine before 
he entered the Academy from Bullis Prep. Plebe year brought its share of 
rain to him, and not until he was a Youngster and some of the rain had ceased, 
was he able to follow along more pleasant pursuits. Krieg's ability in the pool 
as well as on the athletic fields proved him to be a valuable cog for the com- 
pany machine over the four year span at Navy. Except for the complaint 
"Who is this Kirchoff character, anyway?", he was always satisfied with life. 






315 





LLOYD BUCHANAN WIGHT KRINER 



// askington, D.C. 



Tuffv is iidi like most Midshipmen in thai he represi nti d W ashington, D.C". 
instead of a state. Participation in soccer ai Landon Prep school pur him in 
good shape for rii<- Varsitj Soccer squad here at the Academy. When no) on 
the athletic field or studying, Turfy could be found behind the cover of almost 
any science fiction book, or listening to one of his fine classical records. A 
master of curtness, more than one person felt the lash of his unleashed tongue; 
converselj he could also be tin epitome ol tact when the occasion demanded. 
We «ill always recall him for his good nature, and ahilirv to make friends. 



HERBERT BRENT KUYKENDALL 



Coin mbus, Mississippi 



\ ready \ur and a readiness to share a joke characterize Herb. He- is a 
friendly and congenial person with a smile and kind word for everyone. Herb 
was horn in Louisiana in the early 30's and ir was nor very long after his birth 
that Mississippi became his legal domicile. He attended high school and ele- 
mentary school in Mississippi as well as matriculating ar "State" for a 
year. Before his entrance into the Vcademy, and after his brief stay in college. 
Herb served in the Army with the Medical Corps. His first contact with the 
Navy came about when he was ordered n> the Naval Academy Preparatory 
School ar Bainbridge. 




WILLIAM ALBERT LA BARGE 



naw, Michigan 



Bill came ro us from the shadows of the world's largest bean elevator after 
a year in NROTC ar Marquette. Tall and easy-going, he could usually be 
found in the fencing loft where he put his talents to work for the varsity squad. 
Softball and lacrosse also occupied his after class hours, along with bull sessions 
and liberty. Older than his two roommates. Bill had the duty of attempting to 
keep them in line, while they enjoyed the dubious honor of listening to his 
"Saginaw folk tunes.'" What he lacked in vocal talent, however, he made up 
for in his ability to get along with others. 



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DAVID WARREN LA J SUN ESSE 



Sebago Lake, Maine 



During a series of musters Plebe Year, Dave had the distinction of answering 
a number, since no one could pronounce his name. Since then he has borne 
many a corruption of his French name with a smile. But his Maine temper 
once got the best of him, when someone called him "Lingerie." Dave hated 
hells, except those which meant liberty or the end of a Skinny class. Dave 
became famous Plebe Year by scoring a goal for the opposition while a mem- 
ber of the Plebe Lacrosse team. But he must have been forgiven since he was 
permitted to sit on the varsity bench as an upperclassman. Being one of the 
many Severn School Alumni in the class, he found many friends waiting for 
him at the Academy. 



JIMMIE DALE LAKEY 



Boise, Idaho 



No one ever had to ask where Jim was from, for his bass voice booming out 
with "Away Bevond the Hills of Idaho" could be heard corridors away. On 
most Saturday nights he could be found over at the Hops, seeing that they 
were running smoothly. As chairman of the Second Class Hop Committee, he 
spent many long hours wondering how to make our Ring Dance a good one. 
His weekends were often devoted to his hobbies — beautiful women and Latin 
American dances. A Jack-of-All-Trades, Jim did well in a variety of sports and 
was always a contender for those stars on his Full Dress. Fresh out of high 
school when he entered the Academy, he left behind him an enviable reputa- 
tion. 





JOHN JOSEPH LALLY 



San Francisco, Calijornia 



If you had ever heard Big J's famous scream from the Fourth Wing you 
would know that his slide rule had come up with the right answer. John was 
the bright light in the dark days of Plebe year and won steadfast friends 
quicklv with his cheerful spirit and jovial attitude. The various sports squads 
gained a hard playing competitor when John devoted his ability to these 
squads. His daily studies never gave him much trouble but exams were just 
torture. A natural ability for almost any task means success for John, and he 
will bring friendliness wherever he goes. 



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UNITED STATES 



ROBERT SPENCER LAMB 



Columbus, Ohio 



Bob came face to face with the sunny Severn via Upper Arlington High and 
Miami University of Ohio. He was an all around athlete in high school having 
played football and tennis, besides being captain of the swimming team. At 
Miami I . Hob was treasurer of the freshman class, and a member of Phi 
Gamma Delta. A former NROTC man. Hob found Academy routine to his 
liking. I lis spirit and industrious attitude have helped his company stand high 
m the competition. Popular with the femmes, Hob was called "the company 
lover." 



FRANCIS JOHN LAMOTTE 



New York, New York 



\ltri spending a year at Manhattan College, frank arrived on the banks 
ot the Severn for Ins four year tour of duty. He took time with the books as 
we all did, but afternoons found him adding to the company's points on the 

Hospital Point cross country c se and in touch football. Enjoyment of 

reading, music and hull sessions, plus a healthy respect for the rack occupied 
the hours nor taken up elsewhere. Nor entirely satisfied with the itinerary of 
Youngster cruise, he set our in a parry of three for the previously unseen 
stretches of Europe as a parr ol his second class summer leave. Endowed with 
a sense of humor, he managed to keep his classmates going, even when things 

looked bleakest. 



THOMAS CHARLES LAMPSA 



(jilberl, Minnesota 



"Wick" found it extremely hard to break awaj from his trap lines and 
hunting, for his four years at the Naval Academy. The swimming tests and the 
obstacle course were no strain for him; he just imagined himself back in the 
woods on the Canadian border of Minnesota. When he wasn't out in town 
visiting one of the many families with whom he made friends, he could gen- 
erally be found down in the bowling alleys. Whenever he was in his room, you 
could expect to hear either harmonica music or "picking and stomping" music. 
Wick was quiet but well liked by everyone. 




51S 





NAVAL ACADEMY 






WestL 



inn, 



JOHN LOWELL LAND IS 

After a semester at Linfield College proved to John his dislike for studies, 
he gave it up for a tour in the Navy- His transfer to the Naval Prep School 
ended John's duty with the Bremerton tugboats. Athletically-minded, John 
was always found participating fully in company sports. He was espe- 
cially a standout in basketball, steeplechase and volleyball, in which he helped 
garner several Brigade and regimental championships. Finding no trouble 
with the books, John was able to take the time entertaining on his ukulele- 
converted-mandolin. He was always handy with a tale of hunting in the 
Oregon woods. 




JOHN PERRY LANGENH EIM 



Newport Beach, California 



When John came to the Academy, he brought greetings from the California 
Chamber of Commerce, and he continued to acclaim the wonders of his home 
state to anyone who would listen. When he came back from leave, his dark 
tans revealed his favorite pastime — basking on those beautiful Newport 
beaches. He especially enjoyed playing football and was always on the Bat- 
talion and company football team rosters. John was a steady, easy-going, yet 
efficient type of guy who always seemed to be able to get the job done no 
matter how difficult it might be. 



THOMAS RHODES LANGLEY, JR 



Redzvood City, California 



Even though he was born in Baltimore, Tom still claims sunny California 
as his home. He is a real meat and potatoes man, which might account for his 
having been a stand-out on his high school gridiron for three straight years. 
His roommates were constantly pestered by Plebes coming in to ask the old 
submariner about his days on the Pomodon. When he wasn't running Plebes 
or listening to classical music, he could be found bowling over the opposing 
teams on the lacrosse and soccer fields. If you ever want anything 
done in Redwood City, see Tom, a member of the Chamber of Commerce. 
Politician? 





319 






BURTON RANDOLPH LAUB JR. 



Erie, Pennsylvania 



Burr began his yen for higher education by spending ;i year at Purdue where 
he \\ as enrolled in the NR< > I C. I le i<">k ;i likm^ r<> rh< Navy w aj and decided 
on a lurch ar N ; ;i\ \ lech. While ar the \cademy, he acquired rlie nickname, 
"Killer Laub," due ro the skull and cross-bones he had stenciled on his skivvies. 
Academics came easj to Hurt, and so he spent his tree rime reading from his 
renowned collection ol pocket novels (mostl) Westerns). In the afternoons, 
Burr could be found flexing his muscles over at the wrestling lofl or straining 
his back :ir the boathouse, for he disliked being idle for long. 



PHILIP GEORGE LEAHY 



\ i i York City, New York 



Phil came ro rln- Vcademy from \ \PS. and quickly ruined his Hen ex- 
perience into becoming a credit ro the Brigade. Phil's athletic ability, along 
with Ins size, enabled him to become a member of the Plebe Basketball I earn. 
and a key player in company and Battalion sports. The Plebes suffered under 
him for awhile, hut it didn't rake long for them to find our that he was as 
iusr as he was hard. He was as quick ro help them as he was to correct rhem. 
Academics came easy for Phil, and he is sure to be a success in the service 
that he has chosen. Xo call ro wish Phil pood luck competence makes its 
own luck in advance. 



GERALD BARRY LEAVEY. JR 



Arlington, Texas 



Barry came ro the Academy after attending Arlington State College in 
Texas for one year, and the University of Maryland for one semester. At both 
schools he was a member of the ROTC. While ar the Academy he was a mem- 
ber of the Varsity Gymnastics team and played several inrermural sports. 
Although Barry was not a starman scholastically, he made an above average 
mark. Barn' was the member of his class who officially ended Plebe year by 
placing his cap on the top of Herndon Monument. His great love for good 
music and the fine arts provided him with a great deal of satisfaction. 




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JOHN RHORER LEGENDRE 



Thibodaux, Lot 



"What's this riding through Gate Three on a 'gator, stuffin' his mouth 
with Pralines ?" That was our John, a few years back, right out of the bayous. 
A triple threat athlete in high school, John was an LSU "Tiger" before meet- 
ing his first stencil at Canoe U. Extra-curricularly, the Newman Club, Catholic 
Choir, Foreign Relations Club, Batt football, and boxing have all claimed 
John. His musical taste is universal with an innate emphasis on good old New 
Orleans Jazz. And if sincerity, competence, drive and genuineness still count, 
this personable gent couldn't keep success away from his door if he tried. 



HARRY FEHL LENHARDT. JR 



Lancaster, Pennsylvania 



It has been said that a person's popularity can be judged by the number 
of his nicknames, and Harry certainly had a variety of such descriptive titles. 
Possibly the faint odor of "Tabu" upon entering his room prompted the most 
famous name, "The Flower." Being the son of a Navy medic, Flow T er always 
had a sea story or two about his travels as a youth. His assortment of nick- 
names could only be exceeded by his variety of drags, always a source of good- 
natured fun among his friends. In the athletic field, Harry's forte was any 
racquet game. A keen competitor and consistent winner, he was a valuable 
member of the company squash and battalion tennis teams. 





RICHARD JOHN LEVENDOSKI 



Milwaukee, 11 is 



Ski came to the Academy directly from civilian life, and found that he 
liked the military. He admired spit and polish, and was one of the few people 
around here who always got a thrill out of a parade. His athletic career was 
spent chasing, and occasionally catching, either a soccer ball, handball, or a 
lacrosse ball. Weekends rarely found Ski in the hall and the problem of how 
to get enough sleep between Friday night and Sunday often was solved at the 
expense of Monday's classes. Regardless of what course Ski takes, his Academy 
training will be put to good use. 



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CHARLES ALLEN LEVIS 



Brook! inr, Massach usetts 



Graduating from Brookline High. Choo came to the Academy after a period 
ot preparation at Bullis School. Since he had always been closely associated 
with football and its more vigorous aspects, he naturally made a name for 
himself on the gridiron at Navy. Perhaps he will be recalled even more readily 
for his good natured humor which would seldom succumb to the drudgery of 
daily routine. Choo also had an avid craving for sausage, especially the im- 
ported varieties, no doubt a legac\ from his Danish ancestry. 



THEODORE EDWIN LEWIN 



Augusta, Maine' 




?*^ 



It w as on I ed's first Youngster Cruise, .is an NROTC Midshipman enjoy- 
ing the pleasures ol Europe, that he received his orders to report to the Naval 
Academy. It was rumored that he fell in love with the Vcademy when he saw 
an aerial photograph of it hanging in a taxi cab in Washington, I). C. Here, 
led could have been found anywhere from the debating rostrum to the hand- 
ball courts. Ilis free time was iargel) spent between waiting tor the lastest 
"Playboy," and fixing rhe bricks in the bottom of the Naraforium pool. 
PlentJ ol haul work, whether it was Studying Or running Plehes, gave "I he 
Little Bonzo" a desirable reputation around rhe halls of the Vadcmy. 



FRANKLIN JOSEPH LEWIS San Diego, California 

I he switch from civilian to midshipman wasn't as hard for Pug as it might 
have been. Being a Marine Junior, he has lived with the service all of his life. 
In this capacity he could claim most any plot of ground from Peiping, China 
to Quantico as home, for he has been almost everywhere Marine families go. 
\\ bile at the Naval Academy. Pug wasn't too athletically inclined so he could 
be found, at most times, doing one of three things . . . playing cards, playing 
pool, or sleeping. He hopes to follow in his father's footsteps, and has a good 
start toward success in that direction. 






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NAVAL ACADEMY 



HAROLD STEPH EN LEWIS 



Colebrook, New Hampshire 



With a brother in the Academy before him, the trek south for Hal was a 
logical one. But he lost none of his Yankee flavor on the way — a gay disposi- 
tion salted with his native caution, always setting high standards for himself, 
and above all, a great will to win. Whether it was another team in company 
crosscountry and steeplechase, or his classmates in a PT test, they all found 
out what it was like to be up against a man who didn't quit. His musical bent 
was shown by four years in the Antiphonal Choir and Drum and Bugle Corps. 
Motion picture taking, sailing, or keeping up with his wide acquaintances 
out of town kept Hal constantly on the go. He showed us that a small town 
guy was still more than a match for anything the big bad world could offer. 



REED HOLLOMAN LEWIS 



Roswell, New Mexico 



Lou, a true son of the West, with his ready smile and friendly manner was 
well known throughout the Brigade. He came here to Navy after spending a 
year at New Mexico A. & M., where he played varsity tennis. He continued 
to be a terror on the tennis courts while playing Varsity Tennis for the Acad- 
emy. Being better than average in academics and athletics gave Lou plenty 
of time for impressing the young ladies that were his guests. His smooth 
dancing ability and quick wit made him an asset at all the Hops, but he 
claimed he'd trade all the women for a good hunting season in the cool moun- 
tains of New Mexico. A great competitor in any endeavor, Lou needs only to 
be himself to be a success. 



FREDRICK JOHN LIND 



Tackahoe, New York 



From Tuckahoe, by way of Iona Prep, came Ricky Lind, a fun loving, 
tale telling Giant fan with a remarkable sense of humor. His star performances 
on the track at Iona made him a natural for the cross country team, and his 
exploits on the basketball court cannot escape without mention. Ricky was 
one of the more avid members of the Aeronautical Engineering Club, in 
addition to his athletic and academic achievements. His is one of those per- 
sonalities that cannot be forgotten. His jovial good humor and ready friendli- 
ness make Ricky a sure topic when the conversation turns to "back in the 
davs when I was a mid." 





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323 






DONALD EUGENE LINDQUIST Lead, South Dakota 

l.iiulv. the pride of the Black Hills, w.is almost settled on the quiet life o( 
studying mining engineering ;ir the South l):ik<>r;i School "I Mines, whin 
adventure called him to Annapolis. Being a man ol efficiency, integrity, and a 
quiet Inir sincere personality, Ins new friends and achievements were many. 
Although he was a star man and an energetic athlete, he \\.is nevei known ro 
put thumbs down i>ii a party. Every man lias Ins weakness, and Don's wen 
the Yankees, TV, chow from home, and letters from Ins ( ) \< ). Because ol Ins 
great competitive spirit, outstanding ability, and true- sincerity, he is a class- 
mate never 1 to be forgotten. 

FREDERICK GEORGE LIPPERT. Ill V 'ew Canaan, Connecticut 

The most noticeable characteristic by which Fred was remembered was the 
tremendous enthusiasm with which he tackled life. No matter what the occa- 
sion or job, it Fred wire there, there would be ar least one person avidly 
participating, and gleaning enjoyment from what was going on. In one short 
season of running he became Navy's best in the grueling sport of \ arsity 
Cross Country. Fred was constantly searching for new outlets tor his bounti- 
ful supply of energy, which led him to many moments of pleasure in his hob- 
bies of modeling, music, dancing, skating, and skiing. One was often prompted 
ro wonder just what he would turn to when he exhausted the possibilities 
available. 



DAVID BENNETT LLOYD Joliet, Illinois 

Dave was one of those interesting personages for whom you had ro do some- 
thing before you were satisfied. We're quite sure he graduated at the top of 
his class back in Joliet. but don't bank on Dave to tell you. He was extremely 
interested in whatever he did. and here ir ranged anywhere from academics to 
cross country. Dave had many outstanding rrairs. but one with which we were 
most familiar was his ability to induce others ro do their best. I his he did in 
his usual quiet, unassuming and smile provoking manner. To know Dave was 
to gain experience and confidence. 





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524 




WILLIAM GEORGE LOVEDAY. JR 



Gloversville, New York 



Bill claims "The Glove Capitol of the World" for his hometown. After grad- 
uation from Gloversville High, he attended Middlebury College in Vermont. 
A year in the Navy as an Aerographer's Mate and Bill was set to enter the 
Academy. A rugged outdoorsman, he is well versed in all phases of outdoor 
life. Skiing, trapping, hunting, hiking, and climbing about the Adirondacks 
have always been Bill's joy in life. A combination of dry small town humor 
and an eternal sense of duty made Bill easy to get along with. Football trips 
and the liberty which followed were his favorites, and he was apt to be found 
in the midst of any party. 



EDWARD COUGHLIN LOVELY 



Bridgeport, Connecticut 



Ted came to the Naval Academy via Fairfield Prep and Bulhs Prep Schools. 
He played basketball at both of these schools and was captain of Fairfield's 
track team. At the Naval Academy he played on the Plebe basketball team. 
Ted didn't take too well to academics, so he had to study extra hard and long 
to earn his degree and commission. If one were to pick Ted's outstanding 
characteristic, he would have to choose determination. It was this determina- 
tion that marked his career as a midshipman. He worked, studied, and played 
hard to earn the rewards that graduation promised. 



LAWRENCE ARTHUR LOWDEN 



Kansas City, Missouri 



Larry hails from the "Heart of America," Kansas City, Missouri. After he 
graduated from high school, Larry worked for a year and then attended 
Kansas City Junior College for two years, where he received an Associated 
Science Degree. He found the academics at the Academy quite easy and was 
alw ays able and willing to help anyone who had a problem. Larry was quite a 
sports enthusiast, having participated in many intramural sports such as soft- 
ball, boxing, squash, and 150-pound touch football. However, he liked baseball 
most of all. As a favorite pastime, Larry liked to listen to classical piano music. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



325 






326 




UNITED STATES 



DARWIN DEE LUNDBERG 



Estelline, South Dakota 



Dar came to the Academy from South Dakota where he had attended the 
South Dakota School of Mines for one year. He was a member of the Army 
Combat Engineers ROTC unit at the School of Mines, hut reversed his choice 
ot service to enter the Naval Academy. Dar had no regrets, for he did very 
well in both the academic and extracurricular departments at Navy. He parti- 
cipated faithfully in company sports, and was always willing to give someone 
a helping hand with a problem. Dar's favorite music, and everyone was invited 
to listen with him, were his "Whoopie John" records, which were <|uite a hit. 
Serious most of the time, Dar had a lighter side with a tine sense of humor 
ami a love for good bull sessions. 




ROGER HELD LYLE 



Detroit, M ■ 



Rog started our from bis native Detroit on a long quest for knowledge w Inch 
led bim through the portals of such institutions of higher learning as the Uni- 
versity ot Detroit. Michigan State College, and the University ot Missouri 
before he found a borne lure at Navy. \ good student, Rog bad plenty of spare 
time in which to become a master in the art of fun and merrymaking. I lis 
friendliness and wit made bis joy of living contagious, and this was one of his 
greatest contributions to Academj life, lie was best known as an active mem- 
ber o| rbe Brigade Activities Committee. 



JARVIS DERBY LYNCH. JR 



Glassboro, New Jersey 



After a hectic year at Columbian Prep School in Washington, D.C., Red 

found it necessary to bear down to meet the rigors of Fourth Class year. I be 
Redhead, liking contact sports, soon found fieldball and lacrosse were meant 
tor him. Standing high on bis list of likes were leave and liberty, which gave 
him the chance to return to bis native "Jersey." Dislikes are bard to find, bur 
on closer inspection the three "S's" arise . . . Skinny. Steam, and Subsquad. 
Assemble all these likes and dislikes, juggle them with a sense of humor, add 
a great teehng tor orbers. and the final product will be a good Irishman and 
the best of friends. 





NAVAL ACADEMY 



THOMAS CAHOON LYNCH 




Racine, Wiscoi 



That year at Indiana University was just about right to set up the field for 
Tom's athletic abilities. There simply wasn't enough time to take care of his 
enthusiasm for winning at whatever he tried. Being seasoned in tennis and 
basketball wasn't sufficient, so he offered his talents to squash. He liked that 
special weekend entertainment hailing from the surrounding countryside, but 
those Sunday evenings with the books he nonchalantly dismissed. At what 
point Tom found that there wasn't an SAE chapter here at USNA isn't clear; 
but he did his best to make a good substitute for it by always being in a 
company of "brothers." 




JOHN JOSEPH MACAN 



Omaha, Nebraska 



Big John came to the Naval Academy with a love for sports, music, and 
bridge. During his high school days he had lettered for three years in baseball, 
and during his stay here he proved that he could handle himself well in almost 
any sport. He excelled in academics, but judging from how often he played 
bridge, it seemed that he wanted to excel in it more than anything else. 
Wherever a radio was playing with a bridge game in progress, there John could 
be found. As a side interest, John enjoyed talking about the cattle center of 
the nation, Omaha; and although it might have appeared that he was a one 
city man, he seemed happy wherever he went. 



MALCOLM JOHN MACDONALD 



Jf ilhanisville, N. Y. 



Arriving from New York with a boundless supply of energy and a long list 
of names for potential drags, Mac soon fell under the spell of Plebe year and 
became an expert at memorizing long passages on the rules of the road. Con- 
stantly harassed by the non-Scotchmen who insisted on spelling his name Mc 
instead of Mac, he still managed to retain his smile. When not dragging he 
could be found sailing or working on scale model railroad cars. His meticulous 
system for keeping track of past events was a constant source of amusement 
to his friends, and he could always manage to cheer someone with a comical 
article from his hometown newspaper. 





327 







JAMES BENJAMIN MACKEY 



Mooresville, Missouri 



Vfter a year of Air Force ROTC al the U. of Missouri, Ben entered USNA 
to begin the hd- oi a midshipman. He brought with him, memories "I high 
school « here girls and basketball were his favoriti inten sis; and ol "Mizzou" 
where In «.- ;i 1 K<.l the Delta I . House home. \i the Academy Ben spent much 
of Ins tunc with academic work, and after lasi class was often seen playing 
handball or running company cross countrj or steeplechase, lien's sta\ .11 
(JSN \ also indicated thai he liked dragging, sailing, modern music and week- 
end libertt . Ben left with us the impression that a lot ol spirit and determina- 
tion could be packed in :i small package. 

JOHN FLOCK MAGAGNA White Haven, Pennsylvania 

I- mm rhe picturesque Pocono Mountains came the mighty hunter in a blast 
ol classical music. One of the few rugged outdoorsmen at Annapolis, John 
could always be depended upon for a stirring tale about the elusive game in 
the wooded bills of Pennsylvania. Hunting, however, bad to be limited to 
leave alter John became a Mid, so he expended bis energies in other sports. 

\s a tennis player, he went undefeated Plebe year and went on to become a 
member ot rhe Varsity Tennis team. Loving classical music. John often spenl 
a weekend listening by the hour to the melodious strains of Beethoven or 

I chaikovsky. 




HENRY LYNN MAINES 



Arlington, Virginia 



Hank came to rhe Academy via Hilder Prep school. Philosophy was one of 
his pet topics of conversation, and it received a great deal more rime than his 
studies did. lie made a large number of real friends while he was here, and they 
all will testify that Hank is a hard worker, when he gets down to work. Hank 
was a very stubborn individual at times, and always had a perseverance that 
was an outstanding trait. His main interest in the extracurricular activities 
was the Foreign Relations Club. Any Plebe can attest to the fact that he had 
a very good command of that field. His pet peeve was the playing ot a radio 
during study hour when he wanted to studv. 



UNITED STATES 








ARM AND DAVID MAIO 



Trinidad* Colorado 



Dave spent a year at the University of Colorado before coming to Annapolis. 
While at the Academy he spent much of his extra-curricular time on the sub- 
squad, but also participated in Plebe gymnastics and numerous intramural 
sports such as steeplechase, soccer, handball, and track. Often a practical 
joker, Dave found himself the butt of many such episodes and was well known 
for taking all in good heart. He was a fanatic for the history of the Indian 
Wars, and did much reading on the subject, as all plebes were well aware. 



MALCOLM ADAM MALLOY 



Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



After a year at Carnegie Tech and the Army ROTC program, Mai decided 
to give USNA a try. Mai, a friendly person, made you feel at home at all 
times. He was a member of the Chapel Choir, and the Varsity Fencing Team. 
The choir trips to D.C. rated high on his list of favorite activities. Mai's one 
and only hobby was playing the bag pipes. On weekends, when he was not 
dragging, you could find him in his room practicing on them. For four years 
he was the Brigade's own piper. He liked to spend his vacation time in the 
lonely regions of Minnesota, so he could play his pipes without disturbing 
anyone. 





RICHARD J ESSE MANN 



Mascoutah, Illinois 



After one year at Southern Illinois and a three year hitch in the Navy, Buzz 
came to USNA via NAPS. His first love was singing, which he did quite ably 
in the Glee Club, Musical Club Shows, and the shower. He also loved contact 
sports but was forced to give them up following an injury while a JV guard 
in football. No slouch in academics, Buzz put his previous engineering experi- 
ence from college and as an AT in the fleet to good use in outwitting the 
Skinny Department. His jokes and stories about Mascoutah Townfolk 
should make enjoyable listening in any wardroom. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



329 








UNITED STATES 



LARRY OTIS MARR 



Tacoma, Washington 



Larry arrived ;ir Crabtown by way of NAPS. Prior to his eighteen months 
as a "whitehat," he attended Washington State College for one year. His 
claim to fame was his wrestling ability. Larry went undefeated Plebe year and 
ably held down a place on the Varsity for the other three years. He also took 
an active parr in compan} Softball. Second to his athletic ability, though less 
publicly displayed, was Larry's skill with a deck of cards. His tricks made 
him the life ot the party, and he always managed to be wherever a party was 
in progress. 




SCHAMYL COCHRAN MASSEY 



Falls Church, Virginia 



Mike, with his guitar, singing, juggling, and fine and fancy diving, proved 
to be one of the more versatile members of the class. 1 lis athletic prowess was 
displayed in the Natatorium, on the soccer field, and the baseball diamond. 
Being an Vrmj Brat, Mik< has seen and spent time in most parts of the 
countr) . but his stay in Texas left a lasting impression on him. I he only thing 
that was able to draw him awaj from a western novel was an invitation to 
slam in a bridge game. Mike was always an affable fellow unless asked what 
the two initials S.C. stood for. 



JERRY PATRICK MASTERSON Amarillo, Texas 

Jerry hails from the great state of I'exas, and although his size is not 
directlj proportional to the typical Texan's, he more than made up for it in 
other ways. Having spent a year at .Amarillo Jr. College before coming to 
Navy was certainly a help to Jerry, as his academic prowess will indicate. 
Most of bis spare time was spent playing soccer, Softball, or napping. Other 
pastimes included the Chapel Choir, books by Frank Slaughter, and an ever 
present cup of coffee. Jerry's ability to get along with everybody, his keen 
sense of humor, and his friendly smile will always put him in good standing 
with his companions. 




330 





NAVAL ACADEMY 



JOSEPH HAROLD M ASTO N . I I i 




Wilmington, Delaivare 



Jay arrived at Canoe U. in June following his graduation from Bullis Prep. 
After arriving at Navy, Jay immediately closed the books and started his 
favorite hobby of following sports. Shortly after that, the books opened 
again, but his carefree life continued much the same. Through his entire stay 
at Navy, no matter what the situation, you could always depend on him for 
a humorous comment. The thing that he found the hardest to find humorous 
was Plebe drawing, which made him claim many times that he would never 
smile again. Fortunately, however, he has and will continue to do so in what- 
ever service he enters. 




DOUGLAS STUART MAYFIELD 



Sacramento, California 



After graduating from C. K. McClatchy High School, Doug attended Sacra- 
mento Junior College for a year, worked for a year, served in the Navy for a 
year, and then, finally got around to entering USNA. The routine at Navy 
never seemed to bother him much — except for a short bout with the Second 
Class Sub Squad. Although active in extra curricular activities, almost any 
afternoon Doug could be found engaged in a football or basketball game, 
where he was known as an opponent to be reckoned with. No matter what the 
future holds for him, Doug's sincerity and cheerful attitude will assure him of 
many friends and ultimate success. 

SAMUEL EDWIN MAYS, JR. St. Petersburg, Florida 

Home town? Sam never stayed in one place long enough to have a home 
town. His father being a West Pointer, Sam came to Navy Tech a turncoat. 
He said it was because he likes the water and loves to sail, but we have it from 
other sources that the real reason was that he wanted to be on the winning 
end of more of the Army-Navy games. Every cold fall evening you could be 
sure to see Sam coaxing his dinghy around the course off Santee Pier. With 
his four years completed here by the Severn, Sam hopes to shift his command 
from a dinghy to something a little larger. 






331 






REX FULTON MCAUSTER. JR. 



Chattanooga, '/'< n 



Lea\ mg Chattanooga, Rex journeyed firsi to \ anderbilt University . where 
Ins Naval career actually began .is .1 NROTC Midshipman. After one year. 
he decided the Navy was to Ins liking, so he came to USN \. Rex, being one of 
the savvj hi >\ n. often helped others with their lessons, and was an effective 
tutor with Ins clear and positi\ <• attitude, lie spent many of his afternoons on 
the squash courts improving his game, but didn't overlook Ins man} other 
extracurricular activities. During second class scar Rex acquired the most 
memorable of his many nicknames, being dubbed the "Flash" shortly after 
he tried to weld two leads together in Electrical Engineering Lab. 



MICHAEL ALEXANDER MC BRIDE 



Madison, New Jersey 



If is difficult to call anj one place Mike's hometown; but when he ga\<- a 
preference, San Francisco took first place. \lthough residing in New Jersey 
during Ins stay lure. Mike came to Navy Tech from a Cleveland, Ohio, high 
school. \mong Mike's favorite likes were jazz, a good drag, and a "Charles- 
ton" step he was trying to perfect. Always armed with a congenial smile, 
Mike has the ability to get along well with all types of people, and have a 
good time just ask him about those Christmas leaves! He claimed he will 
always remember the wonderful days of leave, those football liberties, and the 
great day the caps flew up in the air in Dahlgren Hall. 









\ 


N 


~™ 






1 









DALE RAYMOND MCCLURE Washington, District of Columbia 

Dale was horn in Washington and. in spite of his travels, managed to spend 
most of his life there. One of many ex-Granby boys, he came to the Academy 
after a short tour in the Navy. The year didn't start for him until February, 
when Max Bishop called out the batteries of the baseball team. Mac was a 
one woman man even before coming to the Academy, and says that he will 
always be one. Afternoons found him keeping in shape playing basketball 
during the fall and winter, or baseball on Lawrence Field in the spring. 



UNITED STATES 



332 





PATRICK RICHARD MCCOOL 



San Francisco, California 



Custom cars, hot rods, and sports were Pat's hobbies even during his year 
in the Naval Reserve. He had the somewhat unique role of playing offensive 
quarterback and defensive tackle for the Jefferson High School football team 
on which he won two letters. Pat attended Columbian Prep for a year before 
entering the Academy and while here, he played on the Plebe football team, 
and made the first string Varsity, too. Although he concentrated his efforts on 
football, Pat was an outstanding player in almost every sport. Known as 
"Cool McCool" because of his easy going manner, Pat never worried about 
anything, including academics, and always came out pretty well in the final 
count. 



JAMES CHARLES MCCOY. JR 



Jacksonville, Florida 



Although a native of California, Jim claimed Florida as his home. He at- 
tended the Robert E. Lee High School in Jacksonville, and after graduating, 
joined the Naval Air Reserve Training Unit. The following year he attended 
the Columbian Preparatory School, in Washington, D.C. While at the Acad- 
emy, Jim was active in the Radio Club, and managed the Plebe and Varsity 
Cross Country and Track teams. During the winter sports season, he helped 
out with company steeplechase. During his free time, Jim could usually be 
found in the Radio Club room, working with his favorite hobby, amateur radio. 





JOHN ROBINSON MCCRAVY. JR. Easley, South Carolina 

John came to the Academy from Clemson College where he had studied 
architecture for two years. Noted for his musical ability, John was in the Drum 
and Bugle Corps and played his trumpet, "Gabriel," in the concert band. 
John was always called upon to play at company parties, and "Gabriel" took 
a leading role in MCTU meetings. John's considerable artistic talent was 
shown in his posters Plebe year. A member of the Italian and Physics clubs, 
John turned his architectural talents to use in drawing the blueprints for the 
Academy's new Van de Graf generator. A likeable guv, always smiling, always 
ready to help, that's John McCravy. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



333 





E 



^1 






I 



^» 





UNITED STATES 



& 



LAWRENCE EARL MC CULLERS 



/ 



Smith field. North Carolina 



A product of the deep South, Earl churned North Carolina Stare as his alma 
mater before joining the Brigade. Battalion foorhall was his favorite sport, 
until he dug up Holland Field with his left knee. Then the Sixth Battalion 
yawl added flavor to his saltiness. Possessing an engineering mind, academics 
came easily, and his search for knowledge was one of the characteristics that 
made him outstanding. Earl's quiet, calm manner brought respect from all 
who knew him. and friendliness was his guide. His southern hospitality was 
open to all. and he could always be depended upon for a cheery word or that 
spni. il favor. So here's the best to yon. Earl you deserve it! 




RICHARD JOSEPH FRANCIS MCDERMOTT 

JVinthrop, Massachusetts 

Prior to comipg to the Naval Academy, Dick was a student at Boston 
College. Since he did nor have to spend too much rime with the hooks, he 
spent much of Ins spare time catching up on the sleep that he lost on the week- 
ends. Being athletically inclined, he could do almost anything well, hut soccer 

and swimming were his favorites. His athletic career was cut short second - 
class summer by an unfortunate auto accident which caused him to spend the 
greater part of the year in the hospital. But. in spite- of the long tour, Hat on 
his hack, his everlasting humor never faltered. 



WALTER IRVING MCDONELL. JR. 



Portland. Ot 



^ ielding early to the magnetic call of the sea. Mac gave up his brilliant 
career in the R( ) I C at < )regon State College and quietly announced his arrival 
at USNA. In contrast to his arrival, he headlined his name through Plebe 
summer by battling his wa) to summer boxing champ. Dismayed at the 
thought of cauliflower ears. Mac retired from the ring when academic year 
rolled around, and turned his pugilistic spirit toward promoting the company 
sport programs. His welcome eagerness to discard the hooks almost any eve- 
ning didn't prevent him from maintaining an enviable academic standard. 



554 





NAVAL ACADEMY 



ANGUS DOUGALD MCEACHEN, III 




Los Angeles, California 



Formerly a pre-med student and football player at Santa Clara University, 
Angus came to Navy hoping to play football for the Blue and Gold. This he 
did, playing his first Varsity contest Youngster year. But when it was too 
warm for pigskin play, Angus took to the golf course. Claiming his Scotch 
blood automatically made him a master of the links, Angus would flash his 
famous grin when reminded of a missed putt. Reading was his indoor hobby, 
particularly the financial news. Hypothesising on the cause and effect of busi- 
ness fluctuations, Angus dreamed of the day he could make a killing on the 
stock market by discovering the perfect system of investment. 




u& 



JOHN GORDON MC GARRY 



Baltimore, Maryland 



Easy-going Gordy hails from Baltimore. A graduate of Poly ("A" course), 
he later matriculated to the University of Maryland. After a couple of out- 
standing years at College Park, where he nailed down the Eastern Inter- 
collegiate Chug-A-Lugging Championship, he enlisted in the Marine Corps. 
Plebe year he made his mark in Plebe Lacrosse, but he switched sports and 
finished his term at Navy as one of the outstanding members of the Radiator 
Squad. High on "Smiley's" list of favorites are Baltimore liberty, blondes, 
Boh, and a soft place to park himself. Gordy's graduation was greeted with 
great enthusiasm by his friends who feared he was destined to become a pro- 
fessional student. 



DANIEL ROBERT MCGRATH 



Minneapolis, Minnesota 



Dan was in the Naval Reserve when he decided to leave the snows of 
Minnesota for the sunny climate of Annapolis. He was in great demand Plebe 
year for his singing of "Hannah," and could be heard nightly performing for 
some upperclassman. He loved all sports but spent most of his time fencing as 
a member of the Foil team with the varsity. He also used his voice to good 
advantage as a member of the Catholic Choir. Dan took nothing for granted 
in the field of academics and it paid off in a victory over Skinny. Of course 
Dan, with his low clutch factor, never doubted for a minute the outcome of 
this battle. 





^ 




335 







ROBERT JOSEPH MCHUGH. JR. 



Selma, . l/nbtii 



\ni having heard that the Civil War was over, this Penns) Ivanian invaded 
the South :ir an earl) age. He has been occupying Selma and waiting for rein- 
forcements ever since. Before adventuring up Annapolis way, Bob spent ;i year 
at Spring Mill College; however he just couldn't pass up Chinese omelets, and 
so the summer of '52 found him busilj i ngaged in Plebe summer. Bob tore 
imci Academics with great zeal and even found time to investigate rlu- possi- 
bilities of a correspondence course. Mis days here had their lighter moments 
too, for Boh was fond ol rlu- lull life, and could sir the sunny side of even the 
darkest il'avs. 



JOHN ROBERT MCINTYRE. JR 



Washington, D.C. 



\s a Navy Junior, Jack came to Annapolis by way of St. John's Collegi 
High School in Washington, D.C. Quiet, lor an Irishman, he employed few 
words while ar Navy lech, hut his actions spoke for themselves. Me enjoyed 
music ro the fullest, rarely being stumped by the name of any piece which 
reached his ears. Jack's activities included held ball, cross country and soft- 
hall, hut most ol all his caprivation by the fair sex. One knew who to see if 
a date was needed on a D.C. weekend. Jack's congenial attitude and ability 
to get along, gave to all who knew him a lasting friendship. 



JOHN RICHARD MCLAUGHLIN 



Milwa u kee, Wisco ns i n 



\ proud Badger and Braves fan from Milwaukee. Mac came to Navy lech 
after one semester at \\ isconsin Stare College, where he had plans of becoming 
a teacher. Athletically inclined, he spent four years on the Plebe and Varsity 
Track reams and was also a mainstay of his company soccer ream. He put in 
many hours to pass the Skinny department curriculum: hut still had time ro 
devote to the "X" Club, the Newman Club, and rhe German Club. The days 
home on leave were the main topic of his bull sessions, and he spent many 
hours trying to convince us of the grandeurs of Milwaukee. 







UNITED STATES 



336 




LEE QUINCY MCMILLAN Crumpler, North Carolina 

Lee came to the Academy from the Fleet, and readily admits that the ex- 
perience gained there washing paintwork, was a big help on Youngster Cruise 
He possessed many interests, but was most enthusiastic over debating. Al- 
though he picked no sport as his favorite, he did spend most of his spare time 
boxing. Lee's natural curiosity about people was probably the reason why 
he spent so much of his leave time traveling in other countries. Lee's interest 
in girls was no secret, and the only time that his crest was ever seen was during 
second class year when he moved it from his strongbox to his confidential 
locker. 



FRANK DAVIS MCMULLEN, JR 



Austin, Texas 



Riding out of the wild and woolly state of Texas aboard a longhorn steer, 
the Scatman shouted that they'd never fence him in. Much to his dismay, 
they clipped his locks, and swiped his socks, and put him into a uniform, 
which he now wears with ease and great pride. Added to that, a bit of salt 
spray, and seamanship over the course of four years, and his own horse didn't 
even know him. On the more serious side, Frank, hardly recognizable as the 
range-ndin' hombre of Youngster year, is well on the way to bigger and 
better deeds. 





EUGENE JOSEPH MCPARTLAND 



Brooklyn, New York 



Gene is one of Brooklyn's contributions to our class. While among us, he 
achieved wide spread fame for his unfailing victories in matches of conversa- 
tional wit. When not reading one of his countless letters, Gene was a stalwart 
of the soccer and Softball teams. Always adept at making friends, and never 
unduly challenged by academics, Gene found plenty of time to dabble in 
ceramics, follow the sports page, and write letters endlessly. Being an am- 
bitious man, he set many long range goals for himself, like going on leave and 
graduating. All will attest that knowing Gene was a rewarding experience. 
Tops as a roommate and a true friend, Gene possessed all the qualities needed 
to be tagged a great guy. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



337 








UNITED STATES 



ALBERT ALEXANDER MCPHERSON 



Dallas, Texas 






\lti-r spending a year at college. Al tried the Navy and there discovered a 
fondness for nautical life which prompted him to come to the Naval Academy. 
\\ hile here. Al played company volleyball and soccer. He was an active mem- 
ber of the Reception Committee and the Portuguese Club. As the company 
Log and Splinter representative, Al was at his best; probably holding the 
record for the number of sales made by high pressure. Al spent his spare time 
reading about automobiles ami like everyone else, shining shoes. 



CHANNING WINN MEDWEDEFF 



Flint, Michigan 




Chan wandered in from Flint two weeks late, and lias been trying to catch 
uii ever since. Before leaving, he managed to put m two years at Mint Junior 
College, teaching the pmfs engineering. \ win/ at mathematics, he had no 
problem with academics, "1 haven't read the lesson but it's fruit,") and he 
won his stars. Many a classmate beat a path to his door lor help which was 
always forthcoming even if Chan had to be dragged from his rack. He was 
always available for a game any game, but touch football preferred. Com- 
pany sports, soccer, football, and softball, rounded out his Academy lite. 



GEORGE JAMES MERCURO 



Newark, New Jersey 



George graduated from high school in Newark, where he lettered in base- 
ball, and first came to the Academy with the Class of '54. Plebe year he was 
first string catcher on the Plebe Baseball Team, and was expected to play on 
the varsity the following three years. However, plebe (you either see it or you 
don't drawing got the best of him. Then, after eight months of rigorous Army 
lite. George decided he liked the Navy best, and consequently ventured 
another try at L SNA. George chooses as his hobbies eating and sleeping. He 
says that tor the amount of time you put into them, you get more our of them 
than any other hobbies he knows. 



338 





NAVAL ACADEMY 



DANNY JAMES MICHAELS 




Charlotte, North Carolina 



Danny, who graduated from Central High in Charlotte, the South's Queen 
City, entered N.C. State in the fall of 1951, as an engineering student. After 
one year at State he came to Navy Tech. Having a good background for 
Plebe year, Danny did quite well, but never one to let well enough alone, he 
continued to excel for his four years at the Academy. While here he spent his 
fall term afternoons trying to bring his company through in soccer, and the 
winter season found him playing with the "Mighty Mites." Danny's steady 
disposition and ever-present willingness to help others will long be remembered 
by his many friends. 




HOYLE HAYWARD MILLER, JR 



Charlotte, North Carolina 



"Poppy" as he was known by all, decided to enter the Academy after 
finishing two years at the Citadel. Outstanding for his boxing ability and play 
as fullback on the Batt football team, Poppy was an avid sports enthusiast. 
Above average in academics, he excelled in math and still had time for many 
a beautiful girl. A member of the Brigade Hop Committee, he also served as 
Vicg-Chairman of the Ring Dance. At the hops, one could always find Poppy 
doing the jitterbug southern style, attesting to his love of fast music. He 
always had a cheery word for his friends, and will be held in the highest 
esteem by all who bask in the sunshine of his smile. 



JOHN MICHAEL MILLER, JR. 



Mt. Morris, Illinois 



From northern Illinois, via De Pauw University, there came one Mike 
Miller. To his classmates he will always be remembered for his outstanding 
aggressiveness one day in the Battle of Barbershop Bay. A star man by pro- 
fession, Mike's good bull ability and friendly personality helped him greatly 
on the Public Relations Committee for the Brigade. His athletics included 
intramural squash, lacrosse, and steeplechase. Never one to admit defeat, 
Mike, with depth of character and good common sense, quietly conquered the 
obstacles in winning a commission, and provided himself with a number of 
true and lasting friendships. 






339 






KENNETH LEROY MILLER 



Akron, Ohm 



\lt< i :i good foundation in the enlisted man's Navy, Ken decided to come 
to the Naval Vcademy via Bainbridge. Ken immediately became a student 
leader and entered various extracurricular activities such as tin \ U'\, the 
class ring committee, and worked with WRNV, the Naval Academy radio 
station. Not onl) did he excel in outside work, hut Ken did a fine job in the 
academic fields ol Annapolis, always turning in ci>nsisti-iirl\ good work. Ken's 
keen competitive spirit naturally led him to sports where he rounded out an 
already outstanding record, participating in Varsitj sailing, crosscountrj and 
how ling.' 



WILLIAM HOWARD MILLER 



Rock Island. Tennessei 



From the back lulls ol rennessee came \\ illy, the pride of tin- Rocky River 
Fk-cr. After absorbing a basic knowledge ol the three R's at the LJniversitj ol 
the South, he wandered onto the campus of Navy Tech, determined to be- 
come an educated bathtub sailor. Nor a "cut" nor a liberty hound, Willy 
spent most of his dragging time drawing cartoons, constructing small projei is, 
and running track. Quiet, always minding his own business, and never failing 
to grasp an opportunity to help others, he gained a reputation as a perfect 
classmate. Preferring neither smoke nor drink, and always a gentleman. Will) 
was an excellent citizen of Bancroft Hall. 



WAYNE WARREN MILLER Alexandria, Virginia 

Wayne came from a family of Navy men, his father and brother having 
attended the Academy before him. He spent a year at Bullis School and was 
also in the Naval Reserve for over a year, getting a picture of the Navy from 
the enlisted man's point of view. "Haldy" did not participate in any Varsity 
sports while here, but his talents helped make the company soccer and 
basketball teams perennial championship contenders. Since he had little 
trouble with the academics, Wayne's worries were few, and he spent most of 
his time resting up for the coming weekends. His friendly smile and relaxed 
manner helped to make \\ ayne a welcome companion. 




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340 




ROBERT FRANK MILLIGAN Matawan, New Jersey 

During high school, Bob set for his goal an education in a service academy, 
and a military career. After graduation he studied at Braden's Prep to insure 
a successful entry into the Academy. USNA was to his liking, especially the 
liberty, which he engaged in liberally. A letterman in basketball while in high 
school, Bob did not aspire to the varsity squad, but played an outstanding 
and dependable game in company ball. Bob was a regular at the hops and all 
yard events, and always in the company of something sweet. An ardent sports 
fan, he was the company sports answer man — ever ready with all the big 
league statistics. 



JAMES LAMONT MILNE Napa, California 

Jim got his start in the Navy as a civilian ordnance electrician at Mare 
Island, but with General Hershey hot on his trail, he decided to enlist in the 
Navy. He came to the Academy from the Fleet. During his tour at the Acad- 
emy, he was always available to his classmates with the gouge in juice. Jim 
was one of the big reasons his company was able to win a Brigade Champion- 
ship in Steeplechase and a Regimental Championship in Cross Country, 
during his time as a Mid. With three 4.0's in swimming behind him, he should 
have no fears, now that Mother Bancroft has thrust him out into the cold, 
cruel world to sink or to swim. 





DAVID CARSON MINTON, III 



Columbus, Ohio 



A survivor from the days of wooden ships and iron men, Dave had a love 
for the sea and a fanatical interest in sailing when he arrived at USNA. It was 
no surprise that he was able to secure a top berth on the Varsity Sailing Team. 
In addition, his desire to succeed placed him high in the class academically. 
His bull-headed arguments, his infectious chuckle and a constant determina- 
tion to improve himself will be long remembered by those men he left behind, 
as well as by his own classmates. 



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341 








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CHARLES WALTER MISSLER Los Angeles, California 

Chuck hails from the hind of sunshine and grapefruit, where he graduated 
from Dorsey High School, Los Angeles. He declined the scholarship offered 
him for design and construction of an electronic computer, and accepted the 
challenge of \;iv\ lech. He managed to maintain a high scholastic average in 
spite of his numerous outside activities, including intercollegiate competition 
as a member of the Chess li.nn. stellar performances as a member of the 
Battalion track team, and many other enjoyable hours spent as a ham radio 
operator. 





CHARLES LOUIS MITRI. JR. Leonia, New Jersey 

Charlie did his prepping ar \\ yoming Seminary, where he was a mainstay on 
the loot hall team. \\ Inle al the \cademy he was a mem her of the Plebe squad, 
hut then gave up football to concentrate on the battle of the hooks. He was 
always a sports enthusiast and he picked up the liner points of most games 
with amazing ease, Vs( lharlie hails from rlv shadow of the George Washington 
Bridge, he was always prepared to give a dissertation on the finer points of 
North Jersey, Uthough he was a fanatic lor good food, he always watched his 
weight anil kept in shape. While at the Naval \cadciin . Charlie gained the 
reputation of being a hard working student. 



CHARLES LEWIS MONSON. JR 



Bristol, Connecticut 



Bruno came to Navj lech via Bristol High School and General Motors 
Institute, where he spent a year after graduation. Ar Bristol he stood among 
the top ten ol his class, and was on the track, swimming, and baseball teams. 
He continued with track at the Academy, by throwing the javelin on the 
Varsity Track learn. Bruno is famous among his classmates for his love of the 
taiier sex and his dislike of hooks. Sometimes, during study hour. Bruno could 
he found snoozing over the next assignment. He will he remembered for orig- 
inating bricking parties at the slightest provocation, and lor his hard hut just 
treatment of the Plebes. 




342 



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NAVAL ACADEMY 



HAROLD ARTHUR MOORE, JR. 




Toledo, Ohio 



The choice between Ohio State University's fraternity life, NR01 C and an 
engineering degree, or four years at the Naval Academy was a hard decision 
for Hal to make. But Hal left his home on the shores of Lake Erie and settled 
in Annapolis. In High School Hal always stood near the top of his class, and 
at the Academy he was one of the privileged few to wear the stars on his full 
dress. Three workouts a week were max for this Mid who preferred to rest 
until football weekends or the times he dragged that special girl. Hal claimed 
he could play the uke as well as Arthur Godfrey. Well . . . almost. 




&D 



NELSON EUGENE MOORE 



Wichita, Kansas 



Gene came to the Academy directly from high school with a store of high 
school memories and hopes for the future. Not one to be called a "cut," he 
maintained good grades without the help of late lights and study-filled week- 
ends. Never requiring more than half his study hour for preparations, Gene 
found ample time to plan for each coming weekend and talk about the last one. 
With a calm and cool surface hiding the real Gene most of the time, he still 
demonstrated that he is anything but purposeless. His easy humor never failed 
to sparkle through, and each spark seemed to attract a new friend. 



GARNER EDWIN MORGAN, JR 



Baltimore, Maryland 



"G.E.", as he was known to his classmates, came to the Academy by way of 
a Naval Reserve Appointment. Upon graduation from Baltimore Polytechnic 
Institute, he attended Hilder Preparatory School, in Washington. He enjoyed 
athletics, and participated in many of the intramural sports. His main interest 
was leather work, which he picked up while on 2/c Cruise on board the U.S.S. 
Valley Forge. His favorite spectator sport was football, and few pep rallies 
took place without Garner out there cheering with the old Blue and Gold 
spirit. He will always be remembered for his cheering in ranks while marching 
to class. 



$P 






Hi 





ALEXANDER ROBERT MORRIS 



Annapolis, Maryland 



A true Navy Junior, \l grew up right in tin- shadows of the Academy's 
walls, \itci graduating from Severn, he Fulfilled his ambition and entered <>n 
a Presidcntal Appointment. Since then, his time has been well tilled with the 
old problems "t studies, making a sports squad, and trying to find enough 
weekends to drag. Besides rlu hobbies of reading histories, learning photog- 
raphy, and helping to square awaj Plebes, \l had rime ro work hard at the 
old Indian game ot lacrosse. I hough he possessed a serious side, his cheerful 
smile, optimism in the darkest moments, and natural friendliness towards 
everyone kept him on top. 



CHARLES SAMUEL MORRIS 



Donora, Pen nsylvania 



"(.'■'nl'* Sam was the brigade's own version of Groucho Marx and Sterling 
Hayden. Coming to Navy after a two year stretch in the Marines, Cool trans- 
ferred his righting talent to the boxing ring and won honors as Brigade Cham- 
pion. 1 rue to his name. Cool is a lover ot hop music. When he wasn't playing 
bop records or smoking cigars, he usually passed his free time by combing his 
hair. Sam also gained a measure of fame on the dance floor, and always man- 
aged to amaze his drags with a variety of jitterbug steps. His versatility as- 
sures future success. 



ROBERT BEVERLY MORRIS. JR 



Washington, D.C. 



I hough Bob's home town is now Washington. D.C., he was originally from 
Asheville, North Carolina. Being a service junior, he traveled from coast to 
coast and back again. During Blebe year he picked up the nickname of I iger 
and it has stuck with him since. His fine tennis playing was a mainstay for the 
First Battalion tennis team for four years, and he helped the First Company 
in the color competition by running cross-country, steeplechase, and track. 
His spare time was taken up by the Aeronautical Engineering Club, the 
Foreign Relations Club, and political arguments. He was a guy you couldn't 
help but like, so he was always welcome in any group. 



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344 





EDMUND CRAIG MORTIMER 



Salisbury. Maryland 



Mort's journey to USNA was but a short one, since he came from the 
Eastern Shore. He never tired of telling us of those high school days, when he 
was the terror of the countryside in his model A. That he enjoyed dragging is 
testified to by the fact that he was a full fledged member of the Flying Squad- 
ron. iMort got in shape for the Squadron as a member of the company cross- 
country team, though his favorite sport was Softball. Always ready to fight for 
the Rebel cause, he proved himself with his warmheartedness and generous 
hospitality to be a true southern gentleman. 



WALLACE LINCOLN MOSSOP. JR 



Providence, Rhode Island 



Coming to us by way of Manlius Military Academy, where he secured one 
of the highly coveted Honor School Appointments, Link proved early that he 
could fit well into the rigors of military life. As a Plebe, he starred on the 
Track Team and gained his varsity letter his Youngster year, when he helped 
to defeat Army in track. One of the mainstays of the Team, he ran the high 
and low hurdles, the 220, and was a member of the championship mile relay 
team, proving his versatility. While he was starring in track, he also came close 
to starring in academics, showing that he could think as fast as he could run. 





ROBERT TIMOTHY MOTHERWAY 



Providence, Rhode Island 



The day after graduation from high school. Bob was on his way to Parris 
Island where he won acclaim as an outstanding marine. A sergeant by the time 
he finished NAPS, he arrived here with a Marine Corps Guidebook in one hand, 
and a boxing glove on the other. An authority on the Corps, his room was 
continuously besieged by Plebes finding answers to questions, or by Firsties 
wanting the inside story on the Corps. Afternoons found him hitting the heavy 
bag or talking to Spike Webb. Spike called him "Champ"; no small compli- 
ment when you consider the men Spike has seen. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



345 








UNITED STATES 



RICHARD ANTHONY MOZIER 



Fairfield, Connecticut 



\\ In never Navy played Notre Dame, Mo had a little trouble deciding winch 
team to cheer for, since he had given a glorious year tor the Irish before don- 
ning the gold buttons. Mis artistic ability and a "fruit" Plebe year gave him a 
chance to draw some outstanding posters tor his door, and for nearby sports 
managers. Mo served time as Business Manager tor the I ridenr Magazine, 
bur when tin- books wouldn't balance, he quickly retired in the rack for medi- 
tation, holding office hours there every day. The sports program and varsity 
sub-squad prepared him well lor a vigorous lite at sea. 




CHARLES SULLIVAN MULLOY 



Belmont, Mas such u retu 



Chuck came to the Academy after spending a year at hilt's Engineering 
School. In his years here, studies never came hard for this Boston red head, 
which left a lot of time for his work in the Photography Club, the Foreign 
Relations Club, and sports. Squash was Chuck's first sports love and he played 
four years on his company's team. Navy life was not a new experience for him 
as be came from a Navy family and his early years were spent m all parts of 
the country. In Chuck we found a winning classmate who was ever willing to 
apply his sense ol humor to the situation at hand. 



DONALD PETER MURPHY 



II a rtfo rd, Connecticut 



Don. or "Murph" as he is known to his friends, hails from Hartford. Con- 
necticut and. given halt a chance, will convince anyone that New hngland is 
truly Cod's country. In the afternoons you could find Don out on Hospital 
Point playing JV soccer or playing softball for the company. He spent much 
of his spare rime working on the Log and Splinter staffs and singing in the 
Catholic Chun <ui Sunday mornings. While Don didn't drag too often, he was 
noted for his taste, displayed by the tine quality of girls to be seen strolling 
with him in the yard. His good natured smile and Irish humor made him a 
welcome companion, especially during the gloomy months of the dark ages. 




346 






NAVAL ACADEMY 



CARL HAROLD MURRAY. JR 




Bel-Aire, California 



After a rousing send-off from the Kappa Sigs at the University of Idaho, 
Chuck headed eastward to USNA. Even after he had arrived, he maintained 
the old college belief that a woman should be beautiful, curvaceous, efferves- 
cent, and accompanied by a long automobile. When he wasn't retelling tales 
of the old campus, he was busy writing to his drag of the week. Like many 
Californians, Chuck liked casual, sporty clothes and racquet sports — squash 
and tennis in particular. He loved music and his fabulous record collection 
was the envy of many a tuneless Plebe. With a dashing air about him, and a 
flashing smile, Chuck mixed well with any company. 




FRANK SAGER MURRAY 



Monterey, California 



Because he adapted so easily to this Eastern way of living, Frank was 
almost stricken from the rolls of the California Booster's Club. Although he 
started out as a Reservist at the University of Washington, he decided that 
he wanted the finer things in life, and joined the Regular Navy. There he 
found that college life wasn't so bad after all and, with the help of SecNav, 
came to Navy Tech. To the envy of many of his classmates, he sailed through 
his studies with no reference books other than Mickey Spillane. He was always 
willing to fill in on any sports squad, as a fourth at bridge, or as the guy for 
that extra unexpected girl. 



JAMES BARTON MURTLAND. Ill 



Norfolk, Virginia 



Jim considers himself a son of the Old Dominion State, although he was 
born in Pennsylvania. Jim came to the Academy after a tour in the Marine 
Corps. Dragging weekends and post-game liberty rated high, right after 
leave, on his preferred list, while E.D. and P-rades brought up the rear. 
He just couldn't stay away from the Natatorium and water polo. He 
also participated in the social sports of Softball, cross-country, and steeple- 
chase. He had an unreasonable fear of women and whiskey — almost never 
indulged in one without the other. Bull was his forte. He studied hard and 
played hard while he was here, and derived the satisfaction that comes from 
effort. 






347 









WILLIAM MILLARD MUSGROVE Silver Springs, Maryland 

\fter graduation from Montgomery 1 51 air I ligh School, Mill went in work as 
a postman. Realizing his true ambition, he joined tin- Navy and attended 
\ VPS, where he, became a favorite with his classmates for his humorous sea 
stories. His quiet wit and subtle humor have carried him far since entering 
the Vcademy. \<>r much of a swimmer, he spent many long hours in the in- 
struction pool as a subsquader. His favorite pastime was dragging in Crab- 
tow n. and In- was a top man on the Hying squadron. A good man academically, 
Mus has the intelligence and personality that made working with him a 
pleasure 



GEORGE MUSHALKO 



H'ilburtoii, Pennsylvania 



"Mush." as George was affectionately called by his soccer teammates, 
came to \nnapolis via Columbian Prep, from somewhere in tin hills of Penn- 
sylvania. Famed for spirited harmonica renditions of his favorite polkas, he 
was equally well noted for talent in rinding humor amidst the drudgery of 
routine. A contagious smile, together with a ready stock of resurrected jokes, 
has made him a welcome companion to all. Hut unknown to all except his 
closest friends. Mush concealed behind this jovial personality, a keen in- 
telligence and never-resting imagination. Between daydreams over a pipeful 
of an aromatic blend, he enjoyed life, relaxing, observing people, and playing 
the philosopher. 

BARTON MYERS. Ill Norfolk, Virginia 

Complete with confederate flag, walking shorts, tennis racquet, and 1928 
Y\hippet. Barton left Norfolk Academy for a military career. The grandson 
of a former Commandant of the Naval Academv. Barton had more than a 
little military background. He was usually found dragging on weekends with 
the rest of the week spent between the pages of a Skinny book or a sketch pad 
of cartoons, many of which have found their way into Trident Calendars, Logs 
and Splinters. Bart was gifted with outstanding ability in athletics and an 
equally outstanding ability to make friends. 



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348 





"L." "D." NAG EL 



Round Top, Texas 



Larry came to USNA from the middle of the Lone Star State, claiming one 
of the smallest podunks on record. After attending Blinn Jr. College, and 
Texas U., he entered the Navy where he won a Fleet appointment to the 
Academy. With this background he was successful academically, as was shown 
by his full dress stars. Larry also excelled in athletics. He preferred intra- 
mural sports, and was one of the better men on all of the Ninth Company 
teams with which he played. Known as one of the most even tempered men in 
his company, he kept smiling, but fairly beamed when anyone mentioned 
Texas. Larry always attacked any problem with confidence and organized 
effort, so he should make a fine officer. 



CARL ALFRED N ELSON 



Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



Deciding he needed a change, Carl left his home in Steel City for an enlist- 
ment in the Navy. Soon he found himself studying the intricate arts of an 
Electrician's Mate and playing basketball at Great Lakes. Before long he 
moved on to NAPS before settling on the Severn. With a voice which could 
have belonged to a Boatswain, Carl was a familiar sight on the parade field as 
he proudly displayed the sword his Plebes had sinned so well. Basketball con- 
tinued as his favorite sport as he played on the Plebe and Junior Varsity teams 
before discovering Company volleyball. Whenever Carl sat puffing on his pipe 
and gazing into space, the toll of wedding bells in fantasy brought a smile 
to his face. 



JOHN FREDERICK N ELSON 



Great Falls, Mo nt at 



After two years as an infantryman in the Army Reserve, John decided to 
try his hand at Navy life. He came to USNA after a pause of one year at 
Columbian Prep, in Washington. Aside from periods of homesickness during 
hunting season, his life at the Academy went along smoothly. Somehow he 
could never reconcile Maryland's idea of winter with his memories of snow- 
drifts in May. In intramural sports, John found an outlet by playing football 
and basketball, which he had played in high and prep schools. John was 
always ready to lend a sympathetic ear to a friend with troubles. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



349 










M » -S'(i\ .|W. 



UNITED STATES 



P A U L J H N N E L S N . J R . San Diego, California 

Paul, a California booster and a Navy Junior, was horn in the Panama 
Canal Zone. After putting 18 years in as a civilian, lit- took the big step from 
Major in the San Diego High School RO'I'C to Midshipman Fourth Class, 
USNA. \ propensity for talking when he should have been listening, caused 
Paul to have a rather turbulent Plebe year, bur once it was over, he settled 
down to the normal routine easily. His interest in electricity made him a 
valuable man on the Juice Gang and in 2 c Skinny Lab. When he wasn't 
working in the [sherwood shops on some electronic gadget, he could be found 
in the Nafatorium with his hand made aqua-lung, for swimming was his 
second love. 




SVEN DONALD NELSON Pasadena, California 

Sven is as unusual as his name mighty big. mighty blonde and a mighty 
fine oarsman. I lis easj ways and amiability have made him many friends 
wherever he has gone. Sports occupied much of his time. Although Battalion 
football tilled Ins spare moments in the fall, crew was his pride and joy. All 
that he needed was an oar to make him forger all his troubles. He spent many 
an evening rowing up and down the Severn, but he enjoyed every minute. 
Anything that Sven does is done to the best of bis ability, which means it is 
done well. 

HENRY HARRISON NEUHARD Milton, Pennsylvania 

Upon graduation from Milton High School in 1950, Hal's interests centered 
on an electrical engineering major at Bucknell University. The following year 
he enlisted in the Navy. In a fleet competitive examination, he qualified for 
the USNA Prep School at Bainbridge, and following his graduation from this 
school, received his appointment from the Secretary of the Navy. Hal's extra- 
curricular activities revolved about the Reception Committee and varied 
Intramural sports, including Battalion wrestling, bowling and Softball. Hal, 
with his great sense of humor, was always goodnatured and a friend to all who 
knew him. 



350 






NAVAL ACADEMY 



ALFRED COVELL NEWBURY Rutherford, New Jersey 

After a short stay at prep school, Al decided to journey down from his New 
Jersey homestead to spend four years in sunny Maryland. With the possible 
exception of Bull, academics caused Al very little trouble, and with his right 
hand, left hand, inverted rules, few answers could evade him. In athletics, Al 
was a member of the Plebe Wrestling Squad, and he gained much success as 
a member of the Varsity Lacrosse squad. His hobbies included such arts as 
sleeping, eating, and sunbathing. We'll never forget the always helpful Al, 
and we can rest assured that if a job is to be done, Al will do his best on it. 




JAMES WILLIAM NEWCOMB, JR 



Somers Point, New Jersey 



Jim came to the academy via the Naval Reserve. Naturally friendly and 
easy going, he quickly made many new friends. Batt football, lacrosse, and 
track shared his attention for awhile, but he finally settled on track as the 
sport for him. Jim was a serious student, and could be counted on to be ahead 
of the academics all the time. His main interest was dragging, and he dragged 
most weekends. Another favorite form of relaxation was that old standby, 
racking out. Jim almost won the title of the biggest rack out artist in the 
company Youngster Year, but track season rolled around and he dropped out 
of the race. 



MURRAY MADDIN JOSEPH NICHOLSON, JR. 

Nashville, Tennessee 

Nick came to the Chesapeake country via Vanderbilt University where he 
spent a year in Arts and Sciences. While at Vandy he pledged Sigma Nu 
Fraternity and represented his pledge class on the Freshman Forum. His 
athletic ability was confined to intramural competition where he was a stand- 
out for his company in football, basketball, and Softball. Around the Academy 
Nick was known in some of the nautical circles as ComBunnyHop as a result 
of his services on the Brigade Hop and Ring Dance Committees. His easy dis- 
position and ready smile won him many friends here in the Brigade. 






351 










WILLIAM HENRY NILES 



// aitr, ill: , Ma nil 



Hill hails from the far north country, and came to the Academy right our of 
high school. During his years al I S\ \. Hill was in the thick of things in foot- 
ball, basketball, 'and fieldball. What he lacked in size, he mack- up for in aggres- 
si\ eness. Bill liked parties, good food, :mcl ^ i r I s . Easy going and always smiling, 
Hill was always welcome ar any gel together. He always managed to come 
through wirh flying colors in his studies, as well as in his adventures with the 
lair sex. Sincerity and thoroughness mark him as an outstanding prospect for 
.1 successful career. 



DAVIO JOSEPH NOONAN Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Perenniall) good natured and fond of fine wir, in which he is a match for the 
best, Dave loved a beared conversation, and was usually right in the center of 
one. Because of his analytical approach and sound judgement, troubled souls 
often looked ro their "( >ld Dad" for his advice in affairs of the heart and other 
complicated matters. Having no trouble with the practical application of this 
wisdom, his ruddy face could usually be spotted at a hop as he captivated his 
drag and friends with bis winning way. Always a great planner and organizer, 
he is rarely caught without something big in the offing, tor inactivity is one 
of bis per peeves. 



THOMAS ALFRED NORTHAM. JR. 



Bradenton, Florida 



\n \rmv Hrar. Tom. since early boyhood had his heart set on a military 
career. After growing up on Army posts, spending three years at Sewanee 
Military Academy and one year ar West Point, Tom decided it best to go 
Navy, and spent a year in the Silent Service. A fine athlete, having once 
turned down a professional baseball career with the Red Sox, Tom played 
Plebe Football at the Point and here; but after two stretches in the hospital 
he decided to devote his time to \ arsitv Gvmnastics, and living the life of a 
PT cut. Besides his seriousness and determination, Tom has a warm personal 
manner which made him well liked throughout the Brigade. 



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352 





JACOB GARVIN OAKS, J R 



Everett, Pennsylvania 



Although he was the speed-merchant of the fieldball and volleyball teams, 
Garv seemed to be a charter member of an endless bridge game. His room, with 
its sparkling brightwork and glossy desks was the show place of the Fourth 
Batt. Garv received his pre-Navy training at Bullis Prep where he developed 
his renowned affinity for the social whirl. Maintaining his dignity at all times, 
he protected his sanity from 4-N days by ignoring the system with the aid of 
an extremely large quantity of "slap leather" western novels. Always alert and 
attentive to duty, Garv has what it takes to be a fine officer. 



DONALD BARRY CO N N ELL 



San Diego, California 



There's one thing that "Tiger" will never have to worry about — he will 
never want for a job. He is the type of man that is in never ceasing demand 
by the California Chamber of Commerce. Don't get the impression that Tiger 
is prejudiced over the sunny (?) state to too great a degree. However, it is 
rumored that for the last four years every time we had chilled sliced oranges 
for breakfast, he made the steward run back to the pantry to see if "Sun 
Kissed" was stamped on the peels. Tiger wishes to follow in the footsteps of 
his father in making a success of a career in the service. 





JEROME A RTH U R CON N ELL 



Turners Falls, Massachusetts 



Jerry came into the Academy via NAPS and the Navy, where he spent a 
year as ETSN. While at the Academy, Jerry was a member of several steeple- 
chase and cross country championship teams. Not being an ordnance cut, 
Jerrv torgot to allow for setback and, during an exceptionally fast start in 
steeplechase, ran out from under half his hair. Jerry lists his favorite subject 
as French, in which he always earned stars, and exploited his interest by be- 
longing to the French Club. For a pastime, Jerry liked reading and popular 
music, but confined his own singing to the shower. With the "Luck of the 
Irish" and his own determination, Jerry met the challenges of USNA very 
successfully. 



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KYRAN MICHAEL O'DWYER 



Annapolis Roads, Maryland 



Ken arrived at the Academy fresh from the University of Maryland, where 
he majored in Electrical Engineering. He was always ready to engage in any 
verbal duel, especially in the field of politics. Ken divided his spare time be- 
tween rowing and listening to his vast collection of classical records. His 
journalistic talent was called to the fore, when he served on the staffs of the 
Log and the Trident Magazines. Professionally, he was a member of the 
combined engineering clubs, the Russian club, and the United States Naval 
Institute. All in all, his diversified abilities appear to be an excellent back- 
ground tor his career in the service. 




DONALD TAYLOR OGRAM 



Swarth more, J'm nsylva n ia 



Don. known to all his classmates and friends as Oggie, was a far above 
average student.. Before entering the Academy he attended Bulbs Prep School 
and therefore had an ample supply of Washington phone numbers. Although 
he seldom had rime to practice, < >ggii- could run his fingers up and down a 
clarinet with comparative case. He liked the body building sports and spent 
many hours in MacDonough Hall rope climbing. Equipped with an engineer- 
ing mind. Don's favorite subjects were Skinny and Math; and the Mull De- 
partment gave him his biggest headaches. 



MARK ANTHONY O'HARA. JR. 



Baltimore, Maryland 



When he graduated from Mr. St. Joseph's High in Baltimore, Mark couldn't 
decide whether to go to Notre Dame, Georgetown, or Navy. In June of 1952 
he came to the Naval Academy, bringing with him a love for track, his home 
town Orioles, girls, and hill-billy music. His troubles were never of an important 
nature; rather, he worried about the current young lady, the weekend, or a 
track meet. I he Track Team's travels brought him amatory fame as well as a 
reputation on the cinder paths. Mark had one favorite of all of Navy's scenic 
beauties, his rack. When story telling time came around he could usually be 
counted on for a big grin and a ready blush. 



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NAVAL ACADEMY 



DOUGLASS JOHN OHM EN 




Riverside, California 



From the sunny southern shores of California came Doug to further his 
maritime pursuits. At home his free time was spent in sailing in the bays and 
inlets of the coast of California. Besides bringing his appreciation for sailing, 
Doug also brought the glad welcome that a native Californian shows to a 
prospective settler of the area, and a personality as warm as the California 
countryside. Coming straight out of high school, he found little trouble in 
readjusting his life to the routine of the Naval Academy and to his studies. 
Thus, he spent much time yawl sailing, singing in both the Choir and Glee 
Club, and aiding his company with active participation in every event. 




WILLIAM JOSEPH O'KEEFE 



Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania 



Bill entered the Academy after a year in the Naval Reserve, as an alumnus 
of Bullis Prep. An avid sports car enthusiast, his room was always cluttered 
with models of cars. He enjoyed working with his hands, and was always 
riddling with something. Many Mid pajamas bear his trademark. Anything 
pertaining to Art always found Bill in the midst of it. Plebe year his wives 
were in debt to him for his unique football posters, and in later years at the 
Academy, Bill contributed his artistic talents to many worthy causes. Never 
one for sports, he turned his interests to photography and women. Bill's pro- 
ficiency grew from the desire, not the need. 



ERN EST ARTHUR OLDS 



Elmhiirst, Iilinoi 



Ernie came to the Academy directly from high school, but even so, aca- 
demics offered him no problem. He had long been an aviation enthusiast, 
having been a Civil Air Patrol Cadet before entering the Academy. Naturally 
he was a member of the Aeronautical Engineering Club while a Mid. Among 
his other various extracurricular activities, Ernie was a member of the Plebe 
Rifle Team, the NA-10, and the Musical Club Show. Music was his favorite 
hobby, and nearly any evening would find him in the band room, giving his 
alto-sax and clarinet a thorough workout. Ernie was characterized by a ready 
smile, an easy manner, and a sincere nature. 





355 





THEODORE EDGAR OLIVERIO 



Chicago, Illinois 



\tii i ;i year at Illinois University, another year of work, and ;i year and a 
half in the Navy enlisted ranks, IVd entered I SN \ as one of the oldest in the 
class ol '56. Not even :i broken wrist, which was in ;i cast for thirteen months, 
could dampen Ins enthusiasm for a naval career. If he mack- up Ins mind to do 
something, whether right or wrong, he was stopped by nothing. I Vd became a 
Mason ^ oungstei year, and sang in tin- Chapel Choir for four years. He was 
noted in his company for his skilliin photography, lid's steadfastness and 
sincerity will make him an asset to anv service. 



JAMES KELLY OLSON 



Duluth, Minn 



\trn two years of pre-dentistry at the Duluth Branch of the University of 
Minnesota. Jim decided he'd like infantry drill better than a dentist's drill. 
So he came tn USNA where he spent his time playing company soccer, heav) 
touch football, and Softball, lie also liked the Physical Training Department's 
swimming program. But the best parr of his four years was Second Class 
summer, where he really enjoyed Hying around the Bay in the antique "Yellow 
Perils." He was a member of the Italian and Aeronautical hngineering Clubs, 
and a favorite pastime was browsing in the library reading about the latest 
aviation developments. 



JAMES EMMETT ORANGE Coronado, California 

"Anyone interested in the stock market?" Acquiring his claim to fame as the 
" I lcker 1 ape Kid," Jim was known to spend many hours mulling over the 
Wall Street Journal with constant vigilance, looking for that one in a million 
buy. Coming from a Navy family. Jim has been around the service almost all 
of his life and has found it to be most rewarding. Known to like the girls, Jim 
not uncommonly had three dates on one weekend. But alas, Jim fell, and 
found himself engaged second class year to that one and only girl. Many 
wonderful things have happened to him since second class year, but the best 
of all has been graduation. 



JW 



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to 



Si 




DOUGLAS CHARLES OSGOOD 



Fallon, Nevao 



Doug tried twice to enter the Academy before he finally made it. Prior to 
entrance, he spent a year at St. Mary's College in California and then, after 
working a few months in Washington, D.C., he enlisted in the Navy and spent 
a tour of duty in the Mediterranean. Although he was raised in Nevada and 
possessed a love for the West, he liked to travel even more, and therefore the 
Navy was for him. At the Academy he was noted for being able to remain 
quiet at the right times and come up with the right answers when they were 
needed. 



WAYNE ROBERT OSGOOD 



Blair, W 



After running rough shod over the University of Wisconsin for eighteen 
months, Wayne served a hitch of equal length in the Navy before honoring us 
with his presence at Annapolis. Renowned for his skill at the bridge table, 
"Bear" has sent away many would-be Gorens and Culbertsons with the reali- 
zation that they should take up golf. Most of Wayne's athletic talents went into 
the volleyball team which he led to victory after victory by his vicious spiking. 
But his participation on the Battalion football and table tennis teams demon- 
strated definite athletic versatility. Wayne's aptitude for a service career is 
apparent by the sparkle in his eye everytime he speaks of leave and pay day. 





CORNELIUS JOSEPH O'SHEA, JR. Brooklyn, New York 

This happy-go-lucky Irishman came to Crabtown by way of Seina College of 
Albany, New York. Connie's first loves are good shows and his sack. His good 
nature was demonstrated by the way he came through the practical jokes 
played on him. Sheer good luck carried Connie through more than one aca- 
demic subject. Plebe year found him without a girl and he vowed that "Women 
aren't for me." During his years at Navy, Connie changed his mind and de- 
cided he had been too harsh in his previous decision. His best sports were 
those that required swimming, for he excelled in the water. 



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JAMES LEON OWEN 



Stuttgart, Arkansas 



im is our prime example of an Arkansas Traveler. After graduation from 
ligh school, he wandered to the nation's capital, remaining one year at 
Columbian Prep before moving to Navy. Always one to take life easy, his 
carefree manner won him many friends. He contributed greatly to USNA ath- 
letics both on the Football and Lacrosse fields. In the line of extra-curricular 
activities, the Chapel Choir profited from his mild southern voice. None of 
this, however, interfered with his never-ending social life. Whenever there is 
a good time to be had, Jim will usually be found in the middle of it. 




DWIGHT CURTIS OWINGS Sylacauga, Alabama 

Dwight, better known by his company mates as "Cowboy," came very near 
to missing the first trip to Crabtown, because of a schedule conflict with the 
N R< > IV Cruise Able. I le spent a \ ear at .Alabama Polytechnic Institute where 
he was majoring in chemical engineering. In June ot 1954, Cowboy took part 
in the famous Bermuda sailing regatta, lie turned to Battalion wrestling 
during his Youngster year and grappled successfully on two championship 
teams. \ tamed historian on the causes and results ot the Civil War, he has 
never been known to refuse a chance to discuss it. His many close friends were 
amazed at his consistent easy going pace which was carried through in every- 
thing he did. 



DAVID LEE PALMER 



Fremont, Michigan 



Fresh from the University of Michigan campus, and fortified with a pocket- 
tull of seasick pills. Dave entered upon his service career at Navy. I lis winning 
smile and cheerful personality quickly gained him recognition among his class- 
mates. Dave created a keen interest in sailing while here, and every available 
weekend would find him plying the waters of the Chesapeake on the "Roy." 
He was always ready tor liberty call or a rousing football weekend. Another 
of Dave's pastimes was testing the rules of Goren with his Twelfth company 
cronies. With his will to succeed and his likeable ways, he is sure to make a 
success of his future endeavors. 




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NAVAL ACADEMY 



EDWARD JOSEPH PARENT 




Syracuse, New York 



Transferring to the Academy after two years at Syracuse University in the 
Aeronautical Engineering School, Ed quickly won for himself, his stars and a 
fine reputation for leadership. His consistency in action, plus his ability to 
give both tactful and helpful advice, won the admiration of his classmates. 
Not content with merely attaining an academic education, Ed availed himself 
of many extracurricular activities. He quickly proved his capabilities in the 
Catholic Choir, Newman Club, and Foreign Relations Club. These talents he 
also applied on the Golf Links, as a member of the Varsity Golf squad. 







ROBERT EDWARD PARK 



Grafton, Vermont 



One would never guess from Bob's genial personality and pleasant manner 
that he was often the perpetrator of many a prank. His bricking parties, if not 
justly aimed, were at least masterpieces of organization and surprise, and will 
long be remembered by their recipients. A logically-reasoning mind capable of 
solving everything from abstract problems to the mysteries of skinny, placed 
him high in academics, and it might be added here, on many occasions rescued 
his wives from frantic moments. Having varied interests, one might just as 
well expect to find Bob expounding on his deer hunts in the wilds of Vermont, 
as to hear him strumming on his uke. 



EDGAR HENRY PARKER 



Northfi.eld, Massachusetts 



A typical New Englander with an easy going, but determined manner, Ed 
attended Deerfield Academy for his secondary education. The life of a Sanitary 
Engineer was his ambition during his one year stay at the University of Massa- 
chusetts. Upon entering the Academy he soon revealed his interest in track 
and soccer, and was also a valuable man on his company's cross country squad. 
Ed's frugality was quite an asset, for he could always be called upon for sound 
financial advice. He lists hunting and fishing, reading and debating among 
his likes. 






359 






STEPHEN MICHAEL PATTIN Los Angeles, California 

A Former Cal Tech and UCLA m:m. Steve hails from Los Angeles. He is, 
however, more often found in New York where he was horn. The big city with 
irs plays, concerts, and way of life has a hold on Steve, and always will. A 
leading enthusiast, he grasps and remembers everything he sees and hears. 
Music, literature, and art are his pleasures; travel his pastime. Whether if he- 
concert or jazz, lie can always he found where there is entertainment. His wit, 
though sometimes sarcastic, was ever welcome. I hough quiet and unassuming, 
his presence is always obvious. 



LOUIS ANTHONY PERRONE 



Brooklyn, New York 



loin's military career got an early start as he attended St. Francis Xavier 
High School, a military school, in New York City. He became interested in 
the Navy and joined the Naval Reserve through which he obtained a com- 
petitive appointment to I SNA. His interest for contact sports did not wane 
when he entered the Academy and he was constantly working at his two 
favorites — boxing and wrestling. Items which were a close second in interest 
to Tony were dancing and eating, the latter causing him much trouble in 
"making the weight." Tony was not afraid of work and believed a difficult 
task was a challenge to be met squarely. 




CLARENCE ROBERT PERRY 



Indianapolis, Indiana 



Having lived in Detroit, Michigan, Kenmore, New York, and Indianapolis, 
Bob decided that he liked to travel. So he left his pre-med course at Butler 
University to enlist in the Navy. Top man academically in high school, Bob 
■was determined to come to USNA to further his education. While in the Navy 
he learned the rudiments of photograph v and this has been his favorite pastime 
ever since. Sportswise, he enjoyed all contact sports but was partial to wrest- 
ling. Those weekends with the OAO kept Bob's spirits high and perhaps, ex- 
plain his friendly attitude and smiling face. 



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KENNETH MORGAN PETCH Cheyenne, Wyoming 

Ken is our representative from the wild and wooly west. He graduated from 
Cheyenne High School in June of 1952 and reported at the Academy on the 
first of July. While at the Academy, Ken participated in inter-company ath- 
letics, and was on the Battalion wrestling team during his second class year. 
Ken also made the Plebe Rifle Team his first year, going on to become a mem- 
ber of the varsity team. Ken's happy attitude and easy smile will always stand 
him in good stead during his service career. Just as easily as he stepped from 
high school into the Academy, he will step into the new position Uncle Sam 
has arranged for him, full of optimism, confidence and pride. 



WILLIAM ANTHONY PETERS 



Woodhaven, New York 



After two years at CCNY, Pete enlisted in the Navy where he won a Fleet 
competition for an appointment to the Academy. Academics came easily until 
second class year when he had to forego his favorite pastime, hitting the rack, 
in order to study. Pete played Plebe soccer, and JV soccer until an ankle 
injury compelled him to play in the less strenuous intramural program. One 
of his big thrills at USNA came when he scored two goals in his last game as a 
Plebe to bring Navy a 2-1 win. His nose proved to be no drawback as far as 
girls were concerned, although it promoted frequent good natured running 
from his classmates. 






RICHARD DEAN PETERSEN 



Rhinela nder, Wisco nsin 



One and a half years in the fleet were enough to convince Pete that he's 
found a "home in the Navy" Packing his sea bags, he embarked on his 
journey to the Academy via NAPS. Although sailing took a great deal of Pete's 
leisure time, the Newman Club tea fights and Public Relations work also 
claimed his presence. In the press box he became proficient at covering Acad- 
emy sports, which included Varsity football, basketball, baseball, and swim- 
ming. Pete's only complaint concerning his four years at Navy is that the 
winters were not inducive to his favorite pastime . . . skiing. 



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UNITED STATES 



CLIFFORD DEAN PETERSON 



DunnelL Minnesota 



Pete attended Esterville Junior College one year before coming to the Naval 
Academy. Notable among the many outstanding qualities Pete possessed was 
his unique ability to tackle the books. Friendly and always willing to help 
others, he could often be seen giving aid ami sharing his knowledge to help his 
classmates. An enthusiastic sportsman. Pete lists football as Ins favorite sport, 
ami was a starting halfback on his company's ISO lb. touch football team, 
winch for three years won the Brigade Championship, lie is a lover of good 
food ami has no particular dislikes. Amiable and always having a smile for 
everyone, Pete was. and always will be held in the highest esteem by his 
classman . 




GEORGE WALTON PETERSON. JR 



San .Inionio, Texas 



George never. really had a chance to settle in one place long enough to call 
it home. An Air Force Junior, he has been here, there, and back again, and 
served a bitch in the Air Force himself, lie listed liberty and women as his 
likes in that order, but with the ladies, George hail trouble due to a roving 
eye. Perhaps on< of his most pronounced characteristics was his jovial spirit. 
Athletically inclined. George put in long hours on company sports teams to 
satisfy his urge for excellence in all In- did. 



KARL LAWRENCE PETERSON 



Tacoma, Washington 



After three years at Washington State College. Karl took leave of his native 
area ami packed his bags for I SNA. Fraternity life was never like this but 
II) limbered up our boy tor the task at hand. Although a four year letterman 
in company steeplechase. Karl found much time to prove himself the real 
sailor, as was shown by his yawl victories tor the Second Battalion. When not 
talking sailing, thinking sailing, or actually sailing, he was found in one place — 
the sack. Karl, a confirmed West Coast product, always found time for a 
laugh in any situation, even it it meant laughing at himself. 




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NAVAL ACADEMY 



PETER CLAUSON PETERSON, JR 




Netherwood, New Jersey 



A plumber at heart, Pete was studying at pipe fitters school when his orders 
came to go to NAPS. After enjoying some of the poorest liberty in the Navy 
he came to USNA, where he quickly adjusted himself to his new environment. 
After serving thirty days confinement, he decided that the Navy way is the 
best way. Afternoons were devoted to track, but it was easy to see that 
liberty was his first love. Always quick with a quip, Pete could always ease a 
tense situation and was great to have along on liberty. 



LOUIS JAMES PFEIFFER 



Stelton, New Jersey 



The Marines' gift to the Naval Academy arrived to square the place away 
after graduating from NAPS, and immediately concluded that it would be 
hard but fair, like the Corps. When he wasn't hitting the books or shining 
shoes, Lou could be found playing soccer or giving a very convincing imitation 
of a drowning man in the instruction pool. He was famous for his theory of 
joining the system since it couldn't be beaten. Lou plans on going right back 
in the Corps upon graduation, and donating his "Esprit de Corps" to his 
outfit. 



KEITH EUGENE PHILLIPS 



Oskaloosa, Iowa 



Keith wended his way from the fertile farmlands ot Iowa to Navy via Iowa 
State College and the Marine Corps. Easy-going and ever ready with a smile, 
he was a confidant to many and a friend to all. When academics weren't press- 
ing and he was out of things with which to putter, he drove his wives to drink 
with his harmonica. An accomplished barber, Keith kept the clippers handy 
for those last minute trims before Saturday noon. His real claim to fame, how- 
ever, was being the only midshipman ever to commit to memory, the complete 
Burial Service from the prayer book while attending chapel. 







-^ <&+ 



& 






363 







RALEIGH EDWARD PIATT. JR 



New London, Connecticut 



Coming from what we must have considered the "North Country," Raleigh 
couldn't skip without at K-.isr one blanket and wide open windows throughout 
the year. Lee entered rlu- Academy via the University of Connecticut, the 
Naval Reserve, and the Electric Boat Company where he made his first con- 
tact with Navy ships as a shipfitter on submarines. Much of his supposedly 
free time was spent on rlu- Sub Squad when- the clock seemed always against 
him. Bur he nevertheless managed ro follow his favorite occupation, enjoying 
life. 



THEODORE CARL PICKEL. JR. 



Baltimore. Maryland 



Living in the nearby port of Baltimore, Carl's keen interest in rlu si a natur- 
ally brought him to the Naval Academy. I he Carl we knew was horn in the 
exacting classrooms of the Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. This excellent 
background contributed to his smooth sailing academically. His interests at 
the Academy varied from an appreciation for good music to turning in some 
fast 22u's for Navy's Varsity 1 rack Squad. If not running track or picking up 
points for his company cross country ream, he could be found taking advantage 
of the slightest breeze in a sailboat. His clear analysis of a situation and his 
affinity for the practical, exemplifies his respect for common sense. 



t*^fl^^^nkfe. 



CHESTER ALLEN PILCHER Galesburg. Illinois 

Chet came to us from the prairies of Illinois. From the onset of his tour here, 
he demonstrated an ease of manner and temperance of judgment which held 
him in the highest esteem of all with whom he associated. Although he calls 
Galesburg home. Chet has seen quite a bit of the country. In addition to 
Illinois, he has lived in Indiana. Kansas. Oklahoma, Tennessee, Ohio, Ken- 
tucky, and Florida. He was a fencer throughout his tour here and along with 
electronics, fishing, and photography, his iittle free time was adequately oc- 
cupied. He pursued with inspiring diligence all that he undertook and his 
career here was marked with accomplishment. 






\£ 




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364 




ANDREUS AUGUST P ! S K E. JR 



New Orleans, Lot 



In high school Andy participated in many activities ranging from Key Club 
International to football. After one year at Tulane University as an honor 
scholarship student and member of the NROTC, he proved his mental capac- 
ity by securing a SECNAV appointment through competitive examination, 
and had no trouble wearing stars on his full dress uniform while at the Acad- 
emy. He was always out on the playing fields around the Academy helping 
win points for his company in the sports competition. His frank, convincing 
manners, along with his ready smile, made him the kind of person with whom 
it is a pleasure to serve. 



GEORGE EMIL PITZER 



Milwaukee, W isconsin 



Prior to his entrance into the Naval Academy, George spent a year at the 
Naval Academy Preparatory School after fifteen months previous experience 
as a communications technician. If he could have been torn away from his 
letter writing, he was always ready for a round of bridge or a bull session. 
Though not the varsity athletic type, George devoted his afternoons and talent 
to company sports, volleyball and steeplechase being his favorites. George 
found plenty of use for his winning personality on the Reception Committee, 
and in the everyday life of Bancroft Hall, his easy flow of chatter and his in- 
fallible memory for a good joke made him a favorite with all who knew him. 





BENJAMIN LEWIS POE. JR. Grafton, West Virginia 

After a year at Fairmont State College in Fairmont, West Virginia, Benny 
decided to shift his studies to the Naval Academy. Having adjusted himself to 
the rigors of Plebe life, he turned to athletics. Benny enjoyed most playing 
football but still managed to participate in company Softball, soccer, and 
Battalion wrestling. Foremost on his lengthy list of likes was leave — home to 
the rolling hills of West Virginia and some relaxation. His dislikes included 
P-works, Russian, and answer-seeking Plebes during study hour. 



mm 



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m 




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JOE DANIEL POPE 



Montrose, Arkansas 



A sturdy "razorback" hailing from the deep South, Joe decided to pursue a 
career in Navy upon his graduation from high school. Joe attended Columbian 
Prep school for one year in preparation for the forthcoming years at the Acad- 
emy. An ardent reader. Joe could he found with his head huried in some form 
of literature most of his free time. The rest of his free time was usually spent 
writing to the ( ) \( ) i one among others, many others I. Joe was somehow blessed 
with a mystic charm which stood him well with the gals. After Stroud Class 
summer |oe was convinced rhar some sort ot an aviation career was lor him. 




WENDELL WYNNE POWELL Swainsboro, G.-orgia 

Before entering the Naval Academy, Wend) attended Georgia Military 
College. I here- he excelled in academics and was a cadet officer. With this pre- 
vious military .training, he naturally fell into the Naval Academy routine 
easily, lie was very active in company acti\ ities and was always willing to lend 
a hand when there was a job to be done. \\ endy also had a gnat deal of musical 
talent. He was outstanding at the piano, and was a member of the Chapel 
choir during his lour years at the Academy. Industrious and sincere. Wendy 
was a man to admire. 



WILLIAM HAWKES PRICE. II Snow //ill, Mary/and 

I- mm the Eastern Shore ot Mar\ land via X \ PS, came a sand} haired youth 
bent on becoming a line officer. When Bill entered the Academy, the country 
lost a lot of good political potential. His keen memory, natural gift as an 
orator, knack lor hard work, and ability to keep quiet at the right time, insure 
the Navy that it has richly profitted from the Eastern Shore. Lacking natural 
talents as a mathematician and an engineer. Bill proved that will power is a 
valuable asset in his battle to survive the system. All these qualities, plus his 
subtle wit and slightly sarcastic humor have earned not only strong admiration 
but a true respect from his colleagues. 






r 




366 




NAVAL ACADEMY 



JAN STUART PROKOP 




Cleveland, Ohio 



Defiant of threats of banishment from a predominantly Army family, Jan 
climaxed early preparations to join the ranks of sea-faring men, by entering 
the Academy. After becoming hearteningly sat in all subjects, he looked for 
new fields to conquer. The Crusher's ability to make quick decisions and act 
accordingly secured him a position among the ranks of "Swartz's Rasslers." 
Becoming exasperatingly well trained, and under-talented, he settled down to 
strike a happy medium between brain and brawn. With a disconcerting frank- 
ness of expression, and an ingenuous seriousness of manner, he quickly became 
the bete noire of free-loaders and sea lawyers. 




JOHN CLARENCE PUTNAM 



New Orleans, Louisiana 



"Put" came to the Naval Academy fully equipped for the academics after a 
year and a half at Loyola. He excelled in electrical engineering, and delighted 
particularly in teaching his "Skinny" profs. Put's natural ability as a sailor 
was rewarded with a yawl command, a boat club card, and a trip to Bermuda 
in the 1954 race. He received much of his prestige because he was the chief 
consultant of difficult academic problems arising in the company. His leisure 
time was filled with swimming, boxing, and working math homework problems 
weeks in advance. Put, a true Southern gentleman, delighted many a "Yankee" 
drag with his "Old South" courtesy. 

ROBERT EMMET QUINN. JR. Chicago, Illinois 

A month after graduating from high school Bob found that he had become 
a midshipman. This was quite a surprise to him and when he finally realized 
just where he was, it was about midterm Plebe year. Bob had more athletic 
interests than his shoulder would allow, but in spite of it, he made the Plebe 
Gym Team. For the most part, however, he was very active in company sports. 
Coming from a Railroading family, Bob came as close to it here as he could, 
by being a very active member of the Model Railroad Club. 










367 




1 J&t 





PETER NELSON RANDRUP Baltimore, Maryland 

Coming from a long line of \ ikmgs and endowed with their love of the sea, 
Pete .M 1 1\ nl .it the \cademy after a tour :it NAPS, with a sincere desire to be 
;i Naval officer. He u.is unanimously chosen as the man of the Class of 1956 
with the hair line most likely to recede. I he academic department gave Pete 
the opportunity to prove that he rights best when the chips are down. With 
the time he salvaged from his studies, he played Batt football and sailed his 
way tn Bermuda on the Highland Light. Acquainted with the finer delicacies, 
he tried hard and long to sell COMBEEFS1 IA\ on a Friday menu of smor- 
gasbord. Even greater than Ins appetite, w as his love of the Naval service and 
its traditions. 



JAMES PATTERSON RANSOM. II 



C.ollingswood, New Jersey 



This quiet gentleman from Smith Jersey came to us fresh from high school 
in Collingswood, Ins choice tor the center of the universe. I he clues that will 
remind one of Jay are his kilt, the duty dimples, the Pittsburgh Pirates, trains, 
the amazing ability to contract poison ivy in mid-winter, and Pogo hooks. 
Watch the grease shoes when this man's around, though, for his roommates 
claim he's the most destructive force known to man. Those stars he proudly 
displayed on his full dress were the result of minutes of study crammed 
between such extracurricular activities as the Splinter, soccer, softball, and 
swimming. 



GEORGE REAGAN 



Astoria, Long Island, New York 



\\ bile serving as an enlisted man at New port Naval Base, Rocket decided 
to become a Midshipman. A few exams later, he found himself taking the oath 
in Memorial Hall. Possessing great pride in his outfit. Rocket was enthusiastic 
from the beginning. Even - morning after breakfast he could be found scanning 
the sports page for the latest exploits of his beloved New York Giants. Library 
watches gave him much satisfaction for then he had a chance to browse through 
the latest novels. Asked how he liked Annapolis life Rocket replied, "Nothing 
would give me greater pleasure than to be able to spend a few more years here 
as 16th Company Officer or as a Steam Prof." 







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368 




ALLEN EUGENE REED, JR 



Weston, Massachusetts 



"Nearly," as Al was affectionately dubbed, was one of those rare fellows 
who always had a cheerful greeting and a most apt ability for keeping the guys 
entertained. Many of his days were spent in search of some grieving soul to 
whom he could flash his SMILE card. On off-hours, Al devoted his best 
energies to the lacrosse stick, and as goalie saw Navy through many victories. 
Hailing from New England, his contention was that it never got cold in Mary- 
land. Although harboring contrary beliefs early in his stay, later years con- 
vinced Al that one of his main ambitions was to tie the knot of matrimony — 
because, he said, he hated the dust in his B-hole. 



PAUL JOSEPH REESE 



luffalo, New York 



From Buffalo and a family of nine, through two years at Buffalo State 
Technical Institute and a tour of duty in the Navy, came Paul to the shores 
of the Severn. Amiability was Paul's byword: his ready smile and cheerful 
greeting made him a steadfast friend of all who knew him. A penchant for 
rackets seemed to be an outstanding trait, for tennis, squash, and ping pong 
claimed most of his athletic hours. Dragging and reading were Paul's main 
weekend pastimes. A job packing radios, capped by service as an Electronic 
Technician gave Paul the bug for electronics, an occupation he liked quite 
a bit. 





WILLIS SCOTT RICH Wellpet, Massachusetts 

After having studied aeronautical engineering at the University of St. Louis 
for a couple of years, Will came to the Academy, and upon observing the ship 
models in Isherwood Hall remarked, "They'll never get off the ground." 
Pulling an oar in the varsity shell on the Severn every afternoon, writing the 
"quick" letter, and fighting the "Blue Dragon" took a great deal of his time. 
Will took academics in his stride, but disliked Dago because "there's no 
theory to it." After every evening meal his door was open to any classmate in 
search of some genuine Cape Cod "cracker-barrel" philosophy. 



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369 








UNITED STATES 



DOUGLAS VERNON RIGLER 



Annapolis, Maryland 



Doug is a Navy Junior who attended Severn School and is from Boston, 
Philadelphia. Annapolis, or Johns Hopkins, according to his mood. His chief 
sports interest at the Academy was tennis, which he played both on the court 
and in his room, to the dismay of his more studious neighbors. When curtailed 
from playing tennis, he resorted to reading books on law or geopolitics, play- 
ing chess, or formulating the Op. Plan for his next adventure. The results of 
these adventures form lengthy parts of his autobiography "Paris, Rio and 
Annapolis or Down in Flames on I hree Continents." His fine mind and 
honest friendship to all should assure him of success. 




CHARLES ROBERSON ROBERTS 



Washington, I). C 



Charlie came to the Vcademy after one fast year at the University of North 
Carolina where he was in the NROTC. Due to his desire to become a naval 
officer, Charlie proved to be very energetic, and easily adapted himself to the 
system. He entered into many extracurricular activities, Ins favorite being 
radio station WRNV. \ftcr starting at the bottom, he worked up to be chief 
engineer by the beginning of second class j ear. I [e w as also a valuable asset to 
the 20th Company soccer team, which won the Brigade championship his 
Youngster year. Even with his time consuming activities, Charlie was never 
too busy to help a friend or drag his favorite girl. 



NED COOPER ROBERTS 



Find/ay, Ohio 



Entering the Academy from the small town in Ohio where salt water is 
practicall) an unknown quantity, Ned quickly adjusted himself to the sight 
and smell of the Severn. Striking a happy medium between academic and 
musical talents, be soon become a regular member of the Chapel Choir, Glee 
Club, and Conceit Band. During his infrequent spare moments Ned was alwavs 
available for a little personal extra instruction or even a bull session, as the 
case warranted. Combining high ideals of integrity with a keen sense of 
sportsmanship, he was a welcome addition to the many company teams which 
wire graced by his presence. 




r,i 





# it 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



Fa^jr"- 



RICHARD DAVID ROBERTS 



North Quincy, Masssachusetts 



"The Rob" came to the Academy somewhat bewildered because he couldn't 
figure out how a bus marked Harvard arrived at USNA. But being a true 
lover of the sea (professional Dinghy sailor), he decided to stay and give it the 
old Navy try. A fast man with a slide rule, he did not find the academics too 
much trouble, and so diverted his energies to the business managership of this 
book. During Second Class year, his cry, "The heat's on!" could be heard 
throughout the fourth deck. But the Plebes soon found out that his bark was 
infinitely worse than his bite, and that he was a good man to have on any team. 




HOLLIS EUGENE ROBERTSON Hoopeston, Illinois 

Robbie, as he is known to his many friends, came to the Academy after 
serving thirteen months in the Navy. He was sent from Great Lakes to Norfolk, 
where he remained until his appointment came through. NAPS prepping came 
next, and then USNA was added to his file jacket. His spare time was spent 
running for the Second Co. In the fall he ran cross country and in the winter, 
he trudged along over the steeplechase course. During the spring, anyone could 
find him working out with the First Batt track team. Robbie's interests, 
outside professional subjects, were centered around his love of jazz. 



ROBERT DENNIS RODGERS 



St. Paul, Minnesota 



After one year in the Naval Reserve and nine months of studying at North- 
western Prep in Minneapolis, Bob finally came to the Academy. Quiet, mild- 
mannered and hard working are adjectives which best describe him. He always 
could be counted on to render a helping hand wherever and whenever possible. 
A great lover of sports, Bob spent a good deal of his spare time wrestling, box- 
ing and playing football. His congenial manner and level-headed attitude kept 
him one of those rare midshipman who never seemed to have trouble with 
women. His perseverance and determination successfully carried him through 
his four years at the Academy. 






371 






RICHARD SAMUEL ROMERO 



Minneapolis, Minnesota 



Dick entered the ^cademj after two and one half years in the Naval \ir 
Reserve and a .course of instruction ar Northwestern Preparatory College. 
1. 1 -a\ ing his home in cool Minneapolis for the torrid summer heat of Annapolis 
was a link- hard ar rirsr; hur he soon settled down ro work in Ins usual persever- 
ing manner. \s a fair pitcher and a good hitter he prosed valuable to the com- 
pany's Softball team, ami played many other sports as well. Dick showed an 
unrelenting drive in overcoming all his obstacles, including all those "risers." 
If he works as hard in the future as he did as a midshipman, he will go a long 
way in his lifetime. 

VINCENT WILLIAM ROPER Lehighton, Pennsylvania 

Like many of his classmates. Vince was in the service prior to entering the 
\cademy. IK- served in the Navy as an Wiation Electronics Technician at 
Memphis and Jacksonville for two years. Though he hadn't done much run- 
ning previously, Vince's long legs carried him to standout positions on the 
Varsity 1 rack and Cross Country Teams. His avid interest in sports included 
two other favorites, golf and bowling. Being a hard worker, he took academics 
in his stride with no major obstacles. His cheery attitude often helped break the 
spell of the "dark ages." Vince's even temperament and steady manner made 
made him a welcome classmate and friend. 



GEORGE LADDIE ROSENHAUER 



Wausau, Wisconsin 




*% 



"Rosy." as we all knew him, hailed from the forests of Wisconsin where he 
spent his boyhood hunting, fishing, and skiing. He came to the shores of the 
Severn after a year at the University of Wisconsin, where he earned his nu- 
merals as a gymnast. George participated in intramural gymnastics and foot- 
ball while at the Academy. A lover in the true sense of the word, he was always 
ready for a good time and a party. Many afternoons found him dashing back 
to Mother Bancroft to log in a few hours of sack time, which he liked as much 
as anything. His quick smile and ready willingness to lend a helping hand 
ranked him high among his classmates and friends. 



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372 





THOMAS MATHEW RYAN 



Greeley, Colorado 



Matt, a proud native of a proud state, never saw foreign shores until his 
trip to the Severn. He was as proud of Colorado as any Texan is of Texas. 
Nevertheless, he liked what he found on Severn's Shore, and did his best to 
fit into the program. There were few who could boast of a stronger desire to do 
well in anything that they tried. If his monthly cash went that far, he could be 
found at the weekly hops with a difFerent queen each week. Besides wrestling, 
attending tea fights was his favorite sport. Any plebe want a second hand 
dating chit? Matt's is framed and not soon to be forgotten. 



DONALD ABRAHAM SACAROB 



Haverhill, Massachusetts 



After tiring of the rugged civilian life he was leading at Tufts College as a 
member of the local NROTC unit. Sac decided to see how the other half lived, 
and came to Annapolis. As an athlete, Sac excelled in swimming and earned 
three letters on the Sub-Squad. He was remembered by all for the many color- 
ful signs and posters that he originated as a very active member of the Brigade 
Activities Committee. Sac's time was always well spent, either on liberty or in 
the rack. When he had nothing else to do, his studies always came first. Sac 
made many new and lasting friends wherever he went and was always tops 
with the many who knew him. 





DEAN REYNOLDS SACKETT. JR 



Beatrice, Nebraska 



Dean brought some of his father's skill as a lawyer from the plains of 
Nebraska to the shores of the Severn. Having a flair for convincing argument, 
Dean is a man to be reckoned with in any verbal tilt. While here, Dean became 
very proficient at sailing and learned many sea stories both in his days on the 
Sailing Team and on the Bermuda Race. A lover of classical music, Dean finds 
real enjoyment in a stack of large size records. He showed this often on his 
WRNV shows. Dean's high spirits could never be dampened and his easy dis- 
position never faltered. 



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UNITED STATES 



ROBERT JOHN SAMPSON 



Birm ingkam, Michigan 



To all that knew Bob by liis nickname, "Swifty," it must have seemed quite 
ironical, as Boh was quite the opposite from being fast. Soft spoken and gen- 
erally gentle in manner. Boh, nevertheless, always was ready to add a comment 
to the discussion at hand. A sports enthusiast from the word go, which may 
have been derived from his basketball and football days in Royal Oak High 
School. Boh took an interest in sports as though he was actually competing. 
No matter what Boh endeavored, you could rest assured that it would he ac- 
complished with the utmost skill and proficiency. That's as much a part of 
his nature as his ;itrcr dinner cigarette. 



HUGH PORTER SAMS 



Ft. Sam Houston, Texas 



Hugh was horn at Fori Benning, Georgia, so it can he easily surmised that 
he is an " \im\ Brat." 1 le broke the family tradition, however, by deciding to 
pursue a career- in the Navy. During the fall months of his years at the Acad- 
emy, he could he found running on his company's cross country team, and in 
the spring he competed as a half mileron the Varsity Track Team. In the field 
ot academics, math was Hugh's strong point and great love. Quite often one 
could find him wrestling with a difficult differential equation, "for sheer en- 
joyment" he used to say. 



MARIO EDWARDO S A N C H E Z - C A R R I N 



Luna, Peru 



\lwa\s ready with a smile and a helping hand for the poor mids who had 
latin American sweethearts hut could not translate their letters, Mario was 
a source ot constant enthusiasm tor anything female, fancy, or frolicsome. An 
excellent soccer player for his Battalion and company teams, he also showed 
proficiency in the less strenuous, but equally skillful, table tennis. He was a 
natural for company parties and always in demand with his lithe dancing 
exhibitions and the liberal songs he sang in accompaniment. When the going 
got tough. Mario just smiled hut really bore down to find a good solution. 
Peru has much to he proud of in her representation at the Academy in the 
person of Mario. 




374 





NAVAL ACADEMY 



STEPHEN EMERSON SARGENT 




Wilder, Vermont 



Steve came to the Academy after a short time in the fleet and the Naval 
Prep School at Bainbridge. He had two passions — sailing and submarines. The 
first earned him a command on the Royono, and the second a sub cruise at 
Hawaii. He was a member of the Drum and Bugle Corps and participated in 
gym, handball, and steeplechase. Steve's big desire was to spend a week on the 
Long Trad in the hills of Vermont. His hard work and hustle earned him a 
stellar academic standing. Straightforwardness and fair play made him re- 
spected by all who knew him. 




LOUIS GENE SASSO 



Clinton, India 



Gene must be lauded for his ceaseless, though often fruitless, battle to up- 
hold the name and reputation of Rose Polytechnic Institute, where for two 
years he studied chemical engineering before accepting an appointment to the 
Naval Academy. Hailing from a small town just north of Terre Haute, Indiana, 
he claims the honor of being the second man ever to graduate from the Naval 
Academy from that town. This, he will assure you, is no small accomplishment. 
Addicted to Russian composers, oysters, and lacrosse, Gene will probably be 
best remembered for his performance in the latter capacity, though his ability 
to consume large amounts of oysters on the half-shell has become well-nigh 
legendary. 



ROBERT JOSEPH SCANLON 



Alliance, Ohio 



Bob came to the Naval Academy via the Naval Prep School at Bainbridge 
after serving two years in the Navy. He had taken in a good deal of the Pacific 
in his travels, and quite naturally, settled with ease on the Severn scene. When- 
ever the opportunity presents itself, however, he is among the first to hustle 
back to his home state of Ohio. While at the Academy, Bob was a member of 
the Plebe Fencing Team. In his spare time, he enjoyed playing the piano or 
a good workout in the gym. Bob's own trade mark is a friendly greeting and a 
warm Irish smile. 






375 







f. 






ROBERT ASHTON SCHADE. JR. East Rockaway, I.. /., New York 

Bob came through the pearly gates direct!) from high school in East Rock- 
away. Most of his free firm- was taken up by the Musical Club Show and the 
Choir. His pleasing voice was familiar to rhe entire Brigade, for lie- was always 
selected to sing solos with these groups. Except for :i short spell during 
youngster year, Hob was ready to drag at anj time, and was always a wel- 
come addition to any party. Despite his pessimistic views toward academies, 
he always managed to come our wearing stars. Not affected by his successes, 
he remained the same friendly person who was always ready to help. 

JOHN ELLIS SCHAEFER Strafford-Wayne, P 

Making the jump from Lower Merion High School to the Academy did not 
appear to bother Jack in the least, for he has maintained a star average 
throughout his four years. Considering athletics, however, the name Schaefer 
suggested — to Sick Quarters — something worse than an epidemic or a plague. 
Regardless of these many injuries. Jack — occasionally dubbed < >tto ( fraham— 
managed to hit .400 for the Plebe Baseball learn, to play Varsity Baseball, 
and to quarterback Navy's inveterate National Champion 150 lb. Football 
Team. This son of the Philadelphia Main Line made it evident that he didn't 
take life's problems too seriously. 

ROBERT GEORGE SCHATZ Scotch Plains, New Jersey 

When Bob left Penn State and made his way to the banks of the Severn, the 
Brigade acquired another character. It has been said that the Academy builds 
characters, and here it had a wealth of material to work with. Well liked by 
those who knew him, he could always be counted on for a few laughs. Bob 
liked most sports, and was a fairly proficient participant himselt. His favorite 
sport, however, was "sacking out." His hobbies were few but worthwhile; 
namely women and liberty. Coming from the Jersey asphalt jungles, which 
his wives jokingly accused of being the home of gang wars, switch blades, and 
phosphorus grenades, he couldn't help but acquire the nickname of "the 
Tersev Hood." 



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376 




- / A\ 




ERN EST JOHN SCHEYDER 



Bronx, New York 



Ernie graduated from Cardinal Hayes High School and had two years at 
the New York State Maritime College before he came to the Academy. Ernie 
fit in pretty well with the busy schedule here at Navy, finding plenty of time 
for sports and weekend dates with the OAO. Ernie's one big ambition was to 
see his picture in the ''Lucky Bag," and to that end he worked diligently, for 
he was one of those fortunate few who was gifted in both academics and per- 
sonality. His friendly easy manner, cheerful attitude, and enthusiasm for 
getting a job done, well assured him of reaching the long-awaited goal of 
graduation. 



HERBERT ALTON SCHICK Burlingame, California 

Sherb, as he was known by his associates, made his first long trip when he 
left the sandstone walls of Stanford to enter the Naval Academy. Between 
projects that lifted him above the more worldly aspects of Academy life, and 
surrounded him in an aura of high-fidelity and radio controlled model air- 
planes, he took time out to collect classical records and study rocket propul- 
sion. His other great love, sailing, gave way to the rough and tumble of 
Battalion football during the fall of second class year. Whenever one was in 
need of an authoritative opinion on the latest developments from football to 
Beethoven — Sherb was their man. 





EDWARD WILLIAM SCHILDHAUER 



New Holstein, Wisconsin 



Since Schlitz's dad spent 25 years in the Navy as a Chief, it was perhaps 
destiny which delivered him to USNA. He arrived young and eager, after one 
year at Ripon College in Wisconsin. Of all that can be said for Schhtz, one 
thing is certain, nobody ever wasted less liberty time than he. Belittle Crab- 
town as you may, he always seemed to get the ultimate out of it. Between 
liberty hours he contented himself by torturing his wives with long hair music, 
and whiling away study hours reading philosophy. A fatalist and philosopher, 
nobody will ever be able to figure out his next move. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



377 








UNITED STATES 



GEORGE FREDERIC SCHILLING 



Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania 



\ t"t t- r two years at Penn State. Fred's coming to Navy was somewhat of a 
setback, for tailor shop parties never could compare to fraternity parties. He 
never had any trouble with the academics, keeping his stars all the way 
through. Never much of a swimmer, he nevertheless was always one step 
ahead of the Sub Squad. Company soccer, fieldball and volleyball took up 
most of the extra-curricular hours which Fred diligently devoted to the 
I wenty-fourth Company. Me always thought Annapolis was a good deal, and 
was a walking Chamber of Commerce on its behalf. Fred firmly stood behind 
tin- Inns of tin- law of the Navy winch says "take leave for the good of the 
Service." His attitude toward life was refreshing to all. 




CARL SCHLEICHER Boonton, New Jersey 

"Nick" came in the Naval Academy from the hallowed halls of Drexel 
lech. Mis school spirit for the old Alma Matei nevei left him while he was ar 
the Academy, however, because one of Ins proudest possessions was a non 
f( gulation I). I. I . tee shirt. In his high school and college days Nick was known 
for Ins versatile athletic and scholastic abilities. He excelled in both track and 
soccer for the intramural and varsity teams at Navy. Nick was always a 
handy man with a joke, and reads anil able to cut a rug at any time. Me was 
also well known for the drags that he brought to the Academy, and really 
didn't rate the only brick that he received. 

ROBERT HERMAN SCHMIDT St. Joseph, Missouri 

\fter putting a little polish on his high school education at Columbia Prep 
in Washington, Bob entered the Academy. During Plebe year Ik- was in there 
with the best of them, righting for a position on the football squad. However, 
Youngster year be decided the ISO's were for him. but he first had to lose some 
weight. Bob's ability to ram the opponents line was one of the 150's biggest 
assets. Oh 1 " the field be showed himself to be very easy going and congenial. 
He was ready to help at all times, whether it was working at an assigned task 
or taking the risk of a blind date. 




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NAVAL ACADEMY 



VINCENT L EO SCHMIDT 




Albany, New York 



After spending a year at Niagara College, Vince tried his hand at Navy Air. 
From Airman to Napper to Plebe was quite a shock, to be sure, but Vince 
took it in his stride, both in academics and company sports. In his spare time 
he could be found making points for the Brigade champion cross country 
team, playing his best on the basketball courts, or just musing over a hot cup 
of cofFee. His favorite expression after a P-work was "It was Fruit!" He was 
not to be left in the dust when it came to writing those sweet nothings to the 
OAO, or playing a quick game of bridge. Always the ready listener with a 
cheerful word, Vince never found it difficult to make the many lasting friend- 
ships he did. 




ROBERT WILLIAM SCHMITT 



Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



After graduating from Central Catholic High in the sunshine city of Pitts- 
burgh, Bob spent a year at Carnegie Tech. At the beginning of Youngster 
Year he was elected class representative. Bob was a good athlete also, taking 
part in Plebe soccer, company and Battalion sports. Because he was the type 
of person who hated to see equipment lie in constant disuse, he spent many 
leisure hours in bed. Bob was also a literary expert keeping the mail system 
running at top speed. Although he studied German, his musical tastes were 
inclined toward the Latin American style. 



WALTER LOUIS SCHNEIDER, III 



Teaneck, New Jersey 



Hailing from that unique part of the Union called New Jersey, where the 
good earth is pleasantly divided between big cities and mud flats, Walt took 
to the Navy with a yen for travel, and an eye to the wide, white wake behind 
him. Spewing a hardy laugh and an indomitable sense of humor to windward, 
while letting each day look out for itself, he evolved an everready capacity 
for hard work, and a versatile willingness to lend a hand. From his love of the 
untamed seas came his favorite pastimes, spear-fishing and writing; from these 
a subtle disdain for pretense and an honest admiration of achievement. 





379 





JOHN CLIFFORD SCHOEP 



Norfolk, Nebraska 



Cliff, rhc genius from the plains, comes from a different Norfolk than the 
one with winch tve are most familiar. While developing interests in such things 
as radar, chemistry, and Einstein's theories in high school, he played football 
and track. Later, he attended Norfolk Junior College. Known for his ability 
and willingness to solve and explain a complicated problem, Cliff usually kept 
the prof on his toes with challenging questions, regardless of the subject. 
When not improving his intellectual self. Cliff could be found amongst his 
stamps, playing Hart football or crew, or just taking full advantage of our 
limited lihcrrv hours. 



WILLIAM MARSDEN S C H E S S E L . J R . 



Youngstoton, Ohio 



Formed in a Bessemer converter, refined in an open hearth, and skimmed 
off with the slag. Willy Shoss drag-raced east to the Academy in his hopped up 
Chrysler. An ear-ro-ear grin, amid many tales of the "Hoods" of Youngstown. 
started Willy off to a happy and carefree life at USNA. Always at home with 
a football in his hands, he loved nothing better than a rough game on the 
gridiron. Just about every other weekend he was seen in the company of his 
0A0 enjoying the best entertainment the Academy offered. Willie typified 
the fighting spirit of the class of '56. 




RAYMOND JOHN SCHREINER 



Attica, New York 



After a year at the New \ ork State Institute of Applied Arts and Sciences. 
Ray decided that Navy held a bigger interest for him. When he was not out 
on the athletic field or in the rack, he could be heard expounding on the virtues 
of New York State, or more particularly, on the old hometown, Attica. Ray 
seemed to have a special talent for being able to improvise in any and every 
situation. Definitely not the type to let the academics better him, a good per- 
centage of his weekends were spent dragging. However, his chief claim to fame 
was his willingness to help his friends with their problems. 



UNITED STATES 



5s(i 






JOHN MILTON SCHULZE, JR. 



Alexandria, Firgi 



John Milton Schulze, Jr., the gentleman from Virginia, came to the Academy 
from St. John's and Catholic University, both of which are in Washington, 
D.C. His three years at Catholic University stood him in good stead when it 
came to academics. John could always be depended upon for a kind word and 
a big smile whenever anyone passed him in the halls of Mother Bancroft. His 
favorite pastime, exclusive of dragging, was eating; a game in which he stood 
second to none. John's mature judgement and ability to make friends easily 
marked him as a good leader and welcome shipmate. 



RALPH CHARLES SCHWARTZ 



Amityville, New York 



Ralph came to Navy Tech from the fleet, but before taking the big step, he 
spent two years at L.I.U. Pharmacy College. Even with a year and a half of 
experience in the fleet under his belt, Ralph still found life at Navy quite new 
and different. He had a habit of finding a new OAO after each football game. 
The trouble was finding the right girl, but Ralph had plenty to choose from. 
The time left after classes was taken up by the rack, lacrosse, company foot- 
ball, and Softball. One of the "little round man's" big moments came when he 
burned up the obstacle course in 2:34. His good spirits and sincere friendship 
made him very popular with many of his classmates. 





THOMAS SCHWARTZ Brooklyn, New York 

Gray-haired Tom was not as old as he looked, for he was as active and full 
of vigor as the youngest member of the class. His handball records speak for his 
agility, as do the numerals he won as a side-horse man on the gym team. A 
dead shot on the pistol range, Tom learned to shoot while serving as an enlisted 
man in the Navy, prior to his entrance into the Academy. Tom was active as 
a member of the debating team, and during his off hours, usually proved him- 
self handy with the fair sex. Dragging a fair femme always had the number one 
weekend priority. 



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381 








UNITED STATES 



MELVIN BERNARD SCHWEIGER 



Brooklyn, New York 



After four years, Me] will admit that New York has only one deficiency; it 
has no Navy. Mil came to rln- Academy from Stuyvesant High School. 
Battalion fencing, afternoons on the sofrhall fields, and hot dehates in the 
Forensic Society occupied much of Mel's free rime at Navy. One of Mel's pet 
pastimes, besides extolling the wonders of the big city, was writing that daily 
letter ro the 0A0. His humorous contributions ro our numerous bull sessions 
showed that he was a good fellow to have around the Hall when the going 
got a hrrle rough. 




THOMAS PAUL SCOTT Clarksburg, West Virginia 

After spending two years at Potomac Stare Junior College, Scotty decided 
to give the Naval Academj a try. \r the end of each day of slipping the stick 
for the academic departments, Scotty could always be found working out with 
the Battalion football ream, or limbering up his arm for another season of 
baseball. His wives, who did not appreciate the finer arts, allowed him only 
five minutes a day ol his lavonre hillbilly music. Besides this fascination for 
"good" music, Scotty liked Italian food .ind women of any nationality. His 
congeniality, radiant smile, and sincere frankness were Ins outstanding at- 
tribute s 



WILLIAM WEBB SCOTT 



Nashville, Tennessee 



I In thing that everyone will rirsr notice about Scotty is his big, ever present 
smile. Scotry left \ anderbilr University in the middle of his Youngster NR 
• •It.' Cruise to enter the Academy. He was always interested in sporrs, giving 
his all to Battalion handball and ping-pong. He never had any serious conflicts 
with the Academic Departments, and always put a "good time" firsr and 
studies second. His mam quest in life was ro find a girl who appreciated the 
value of a dollar as much as he did. In true Tennessee form, he liked to both 
listen to and sing hillbilly songs. 




382 





> 




NAVAL ACADEMY 



FRANK DONALD SCOVEL 




■ 



National City, California 



Don came to us from the Fleet, where he served as an Air Controlman. It 
didn't take him long to show his ability as a more than capable sailor. When- 
ever weather permitted, he could be found racing one of the yawls. His sharp 
eye was put to use on the Pistol Team, and to show his further talents, he 
worked as a disc jockey on WRNV. He claimed spear fishing to be his hobby, 
but from what was seen of him on the dance floor, he missed his calling as a 
real showman. When it concerned seamanship, the Plebes found him more 
than their match for he was just too salty. 



EDWARD AMACKER SECHREST 



W ashington, D.C. 



At the tender age of sixteen, Ed entered Lincoln University in Pennsylvania, 
and it cost him two years and countless hours of sleep before he realized that 
college is more than girls, fraternity parties, and more girls. Eighteen months 
in the fleet sobered him a bit, but upon entrance to the Academy, he again 
majored in the opposite sex. Other interests varied from wrestling and cross- 
country, to debating and the glee club, but the sub squad was always the 
dearest to his heart. A great sense of humor, an easy going nature mingled 
with quiet determination, and an insatiable appetite for weekends, made his 
stay at Navy a memorable one. 



JOHN RICHARD SEESHOLTZ 



Reading, Pennsylvania 



One sunny day, Rich crawled out of one of the dark, musty caves near 
Reading, which he liked so much to explore, said goodbye to Albright College, 
and headed for USNA. With him he brought an excellent academic record 
which he maintained well while at the Academy. Although his "live and let 
live" attitude made him easy to get along with, he did manage to get into a 
few tight places, an especially tight one being Casablanca, French Morocco, 
one Sunday afternoon. He was quite interested in Germany and Germans, 
especially German girls. During one summer leave he managed to do a good 
job of getting acquainted with both. 




^ *B^ 







383 






ASHER SEIP. JR. 



Easton, Pennsylvania 



Ash came ro tin- Naval Academy after spending :i year at Lafayette College. 
It was nor lone before he had made a name for himself as a person who could 
succeed under any conditions. Uong with his equanimity . \sh was gifted with 
a rare sense of good judgement. Fancying himself a business man, he was al- 
ways willing to ui\e advice on financial matters, especially those pertaining to 
the stock market. Known for his knowledge of sports cars, aircraft and motor- 
cycles, \sh looked forward to the day when he could gain actual experience 
in these fields. Perhaps this fascination for speed w as an expression of his belie! 
that no time should be wasti d. 



RICHARD WILLIAM SHAFER 



Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin 



Wisconsinites don't come any more loyal than Dick. He was constantly 
talking of his home state, and the year he spent ar a Wisconsin State I eacher's 
College. Dick proved his capabilities by doing very well in academics, and by 
being a consistent winner in Hart, wrestling and track. He spent practically 
as much rime helping others as he put in on his own subjects. I low ever, study- 
ing was only a week day occupation. When the week-end came, he enjoyed 
escorting his drag to athletic events and hops. She was always from Washing- 
ton, but it was your guess as to which girl it was. 



*% 



JOHN JOSEPH SHANLEY. JR. 



Brooklyn, New York 



Jack considered himself very lucky ro come from that strange land called 
Brooklyn. He was a typical Brooklvnite. even down to that boxer-like stride. 
His ability to always look at the brighter side of things was a quality we all 
envied. Football and basketball were the sports Jack enjoyed most, and he 
could handle himself equally well in both. Big and energetic, he was ever 
hustling to get the job at hand, done as best he could. When it came to drag- 
ging. Jack figured the best idea was to show the place to as many females as 
possible. In fact, variety was the spice of his life. 




UNITED STATES 



384 




WILLIAM CA ESAR SHANNON 



Elmwood Park, Illinois 



Preceding his life at the Academy, Bill spent two years studying law at 
Northwestern University. Making the transition from college life to Plebe 
year proved to be a struggle, but rather exciting. Because of Bill's good- 
natured personality his classmates made it a practice to fix him up with dates, 
for it soon became known that Bill, with his witty humor and unending tales 
of adventure would keep any evening in a gay and cheerful mood. Company 
football and sottball, and Battalion golf kept Bill busy during the afternoons. 
With much hard work and study he always managed to do well with the 
books, and showed that he could and would work hard to attain his goal. 



LEO JOSEPH SHEEHAN 



Arlington, Massachusetts 



Leo, upon his graduation from high school, went on to Tufts College, where 
he was a member of the NROTC program. At Tufts he ran for the Cross 
Country team which won the New England Freshman Championship. Upon 
receiving a SECNAV appointment he came down to the Academy to continue 
with his cross country work, adding wrestling and boxing to the list during 
Plebe year. As a Youngster he won his NA in wrestling and his Cross Country 
Numerals. Aside from this impressive record in athletics, Leo also racked up 
an academic mark which stood him in the top quarter of the class. 






DAVID ALAN SHELSO 



Minneapolis, Minnesota 



Dave came to Navy from his northern Minnesota home via Northwestern 
Prep School. Endowed with a brilliant smile, sense of humor, personality to 
match, and academic prowess, Dave both made life happier for those around 
him, and enjoyed life himself. Between the Drum and Bugle Corps, soccer, 
and football, Dave's day was a full one. He was, however, always available 
to help the classmate in need, be it academically or otherwise. Dave is now, 
and shall always remain one we are proud to number among our friends. May 
our paths cross many times during our careers! 



■C . 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



385 








UNITED STATES 



RICHARD GEORGE SHEWCHUK 



Port Jervis, New York 



To those who did nor know him well. Shew seemed shy and reserved; hut 
to his friends his personality made him a person whom they were happy to 
know. Mis athletic ability earned him fame from Port Jervis to Crabtown. 
The Port Jervis Union Gazette still longs for a fullback with a small fraction 
of the ability Shew had during his days in high school. Injuries kept fame from 
him on tin- Navy gridiron, but, nevertheless, his name on any company team 
roster increased the sports manager's confidence. Shew's recovery from those 
injuries proved that you can't keep a good man down. 



RICHARD THOMAS SHIGLEY 



.Isheville, North Carolina 




\ Naval Reservist, Dick spent a year at the University of North Carolina 
and then found himself called to active dun. Playing the glockenspiel in the 
Drum and Bugle Corps, managing VarsitJ Crew, and occasional dragging 
took up Dick's free time, lie loved good music, with the accent on the classics. 
Dick hail, perhaps, the single distinction of being the only midshipman ever 
to attend a pep rally in a laundry hag. Known around the halls of Bancroft 
for his own particular brand of buffoonery, Dick possessed that enviable 
quality of allowing nothing to render a departure from his capricious yet 
serious philosophy of life. 



JAMES STUART SHILLINGLAW 



Oak mo at, Pennsylvania 



Stomping down from Oakmont, Pennsylvania came the "Law" as Jim is 
sometimes called. A year at Bullis and he was ready for better things; The 
United States Naval Academy. \r the Academy, although one of the best 
shots on the rifle team, Jim was best known for his ability to work hard and 
stick to a job. He enjoyed most sports, and his rangy build coupled with deter- 
mination made him a good wrestler and cross country man. Jim also enjoyed 
running Plebes and insuring that they received a fair share of professional 
knowledge before embarking on cruise. 




386 





NAVAL ACADEMY 



ROBERT ALLEN SHINN 




Norman, Oklahoma 



One would almost have expected that Bob would come to USNA since he 
always felt the Navy would be his life. After two years at the University of 
Oklahoma, Bob decided other things lay in store for him than the Sooner 
State life, and he joined the Navy. He came to us via NAPS and since early 
Plebe summer spent most of his free time sailing the yawls. Bob contributed 
to a variety of company sports, including soccer and cross country. Studies 
were never an obstacle to Bob so he found a great deal of time for sailing 
and dragging. His nautical background and his love of the sea were assurances 
of a fruitful Academy life. 




BENJAMIN FRANCIS SHORT 



Davisville, Rhode Island 



Ben, the boy with the Pepsodent smile, came to the Academy via Severn 
Prep and the University of Hawaii. Still dreaming of surf boarding on Oahu's 
beaches, Ben took up diving for the Swimming team and coxswaining for the 
Crew Team. Being small in stature, he made up for it by being big in heart. 
A conscientious student, Ben conquered all but Dago, and blamed his trouble 
on a lack of Spanish blood. Being a Navy Junior, security forms were his 
biggest dislike and headache. Ben's favorite pastime in the fall was whooping 
it up for the Football Team as a cheerleader. He still swears that this was the 
best duty in the Navy. 



JAMES CASS SHORTRIOG E, JR 



Nevis, Minnesota 



Shorty left the hunting region of Northern Minnesota to enter the Academy. 
His hometown, Nevis, has almost as many deer as it has people. After a year 
at the University of Minnesota, he decided to try the life of a midshipman. 
His ability to sing led him to join the Antiphonal Choir, the Glee Club, and to 
take part in the Musical Club shows. His main interests were the nightly 
Bible study sessions, in which he played a leading part. Church parties in 
town took up most of Shorty's liberty time. By being elected Company repre- 
sentative two years in a row, he proved to all that he was capable of handling 
anything in the best possible way. 






387 






THEODORE BYERS SHULTZ Vienna, Virginia 

led came to Canoe I . from a little hamlet in northern Virginia. He was 
quite content with lite at Navy, and always maintained a happy carefree 
manner about him. Company lightweight football, Battalion lacrosse, and 
the rack took up most of his spare time, led was usually among the weekend 
draggers, and was always complimented on his good taste m selecting his 
girls. He enjoyed good rimes, and could always he depended upon to liven up 
a parts, led also had a serious side whenever dun called. I poll graduation 
I ed will realize his one big dream— a service career. 



ROBERT HARPER SHUMAKER 



\ - // • ton, Pennsylvania 



Before coming to the Academy, Shu attended Northwestern University for 
a year, where he was a member of the NROTC unit. At the Academy, Shu 
kept in good shape by running over the cross country and steeplechase 
courses, where he invariably led the field. I hroughout the four years he spent 
at the Academy. Shu always earned star grades and got along well with the 
opposite sex. too. The possesserof a beguiling innocence, he managed to charm 
many a girl and inevitably wound up in a predicament that provided his class- 
mates with many a laugh. Equipped with tremendous drive and an optimistic- 
attitude about life. Bob hoped to make the service his career. 



DAVID NIXON SIBLEY 



Duluth, Minnesota 



Originally from Illinois. Sib wandered to Minnesota, to claim that state as 
his own. Coming to the Academy straight out of high school. Dave had his big 
ambition fulfilled — that of starting on the long line of men going down to the 
sea in ships. Anything else in his life would be anticlimactic. The ease with 
which athletics came to him was only exceeded by his unselfish manner, and 
the undying love of humor, soft music, good food, and long weekend^. Al- 
though not outstanding in his battle with the academic departments, he was 
always willing to lend a hand to others. In Dave we have found a friend, 
and the service has found a man of the highest caliber. 




T 







UNITED STATES 



388 







JAMES HOWARD SIKES 



North Augusta, South Carolina 



Upon graduating from high school, Jim decided to see the rest of the world. 
The recruiting posters said to "Join the Navy and see the world" so Jim did 
just that. However, before he traveled too far he found himself at NAPS and 
on the way to Annapolis. While at the Academy, Jim confined himself to com- 
pany activities. He enjoyed Varsity sports, but strictly as a spectator. His one 
great hobby, travelling, was the reason he was happiest while on cruise during 
the summer months. The confining life at Navy was hard on him and he al- 
ways looked forward to the dav when he would re-enter the Fleet. 



GEORGE THOMAS KORTES SIMPSON Sedley, Virginia 

George came to USNA after spending some time in the Fleet. Being a Navy 
Junior, his educational background covers two continents, but that never 
seemed to give him any trouble, and he always achieved top grades. Liberty 
was tops on his list, while his dislikes were P-rades and reveille. Afternoons 
found him on various sports fields where he was always a top man. Cheerful, 
always ready to lend a helping hand, and quite a ladies' man describes George. 
His love of life and good times made him a popular figure at Bancroft hall. 
Never one to let hardships get him down, he took everything in his stride. 





WILLIAM HAROLD SIMPSON 



Laredo, Texas 



Willy came to the Academy via Laredo High School and Texas A&M Col- 
lege. His athletic abilities were put to good use in high school, where he at- 
tained the nickname Geococcyx Californianus, commonly known as the road 
runner. Not only did he run a 9.95 hundred, but he played Varsity Football. 
As for military background, Willy claims kinship to a general under Maxi- 
milian during the French occupation of Mexico. Even though Willy studied 
civil engineering before entering the Academy, he felt the academic strain and 
his grades never came as easy as his friends. His efforts on the track were 
halted only by his action on the Battalion Football team. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



389 








UNITED STATES 



WALLACE BRIAN SKENE Staunton, Virginia 

Wally came to the Academy after completing a full year at V.M.I, thus 
giving him two Plebe ^ ears. Although he had been through it all before, Wally 
rode right in with the rest of us. He played on the Plebe Basketball learn. 
and was active in Varsity Tennis. The (ilee Club was another of Walk's 
interests as was almost any kind of music. He could raise everyone's spirits 
after a hard day, by breaking out his banjo. Wally always had a ready smile, 
and a calm manner that enabled him ro make friends easily. No one stuck to 
the job or worked as haul as he did throughout Academy life. 



WILLIAM TURNER SLAUGHTER 



Catndfn, .-Irkansas 




Almost everyone who knew this "Arkansas Traveler" had his own nickname 
for him, bur the name that was most appropriate and best known was "The 
Kingfish." He began his active military career at Marion Institute in Alabama 
a year before he entered rlu- Academy. I lis biggest worry was generally nor 
about his studies, but whether <>r nor he could finish the daily paper's cross- 
word puzzle, which accounted lor his never being at a loss for words. Kingfish 
was an easy-going guy who took academics as something to pass the time 
between weekends, when he participated in his favorite sport, liberty. On the 
weekends he could usuall) be found in the company of some fair female. 



WILLIAM DEAN SLOAN 



Rockwell City, Iowa 



Hailing from rlu- "golden buckle on the Corn Belt", Hill came ro Navy with 
hayseed behind the ears and corn shucks in his pockets. He soon losr the hay- 
seed during Plebe year, when he became acquainted with the rigors of military 
life. Plebe version. During Youngster year, Willie discovered the comforts of 
the rack, where he spent many a refreshing hour. Bill always had a quick and 
ready smile for everyone, and this, coupled wirh his fine personality, caused 
him to gain many friends. It would seem that our in "low ay." they use water 
only for irrigation, for Bill spent many a grueling hour in the Natatorium 
trying to lose that last thirty seconds. 




590 






NAVAL ACADEMY 



JOHN HALL SLOUGH 



Youngstown, Ohio 



Youngstown, Northwestern and two years in the Air Force led John to the 
Academy. From the start he showed his great maturity, his passion for order 
and detail, and his faculty for remembering middle names. A keen sense of 
values, a finely developed artistic sensibility, a timely joke, an open smile for 
everyone, but impenetrable in himself — all of this was John. Whatever he 
touched, he contributed to it something unique. As editor, he revamped and 
expanded Reef Points in his constant effort to raise the standard of profes- 
sional knowledge amongst the Plebes. John will be remembered as a clown, 
and as a sage, but most of all because he inspired the confidence of those 
who knew him. 




JOHN SMALLMAN 



Bri 



ort, Connecticut 



A refugee from NAPS, Jack brought to USNA a competitive spirit for sports 
and studies. His rendition of his high school fight song Plebe year was un- 
paralleled in the annals of the Mess Hall tenors. Jack was a key man to the 
Double-deuce Brigade champs in softball Youngster year, the Sixth Battalion 
bowling champs, and the company soccer champs Second Class year. He was 
often seen dealing at a company bridge session. Harding High will always 
remember Jack as one of the wheels of the "Strays." A genius with the slip- 
stick; Skinny, Steam, and Jack got along fine. Jack was a connoisseur of 
women — boasting of never having been bricked. He often graced Annapolis 
with a fine femme. 

ROBERT RENNESSYLEAR SMILEY, III Manila. Philippines 

Though a Chicagoan by birth, Bob calls the Philippines his home, since, 
with the exception of the war years which were spent in St. Petersburg. Fla., 
he has lived there all his life. After graduating from high school in Manila, 
Bob spent a year at Purdue University studying electrical engineering before 
entering Navy on a SecNav appointment. An ardent Hi-Fi fan, Bob was a 
charter member of the Shaft Alley Music and Oyster Appreciation Society. 
Though often accused of making too much of his theory on the therapeutic 
value of the rack. Bob actually spent much of his time in the Lucky Bag 
Office — and even worked a little. 










391 






FRANKLIN DEAN SMITH 



Cherokee, Iowa 



From soda-je/king in Cherokee' drug stem-. Prank came to us, after spend- 
ing :i j ear as an \ R< > I'C man ;it [owa State College. While there he became .1 
member of the Kappa Sigma fraternity, and he spent four years at USNA 
trying n> form another chapter. He made his mark on Academy life soon after 
It is arrival as manager of rlu- Plebe Lacrosse Team. Frank never had much 
trouble with the academic schedule, so he enjoyed dragging, and helping others 
who were nor so fortunate with academics. Always trying to organize some- 
thing nun something else. Frank has a way with people which will help him 
in his future years in the service. 



HAROLD LAWRENCE SMITH. JR. Chicago, Illinois 

Before coming to the Academy, Smitty worked for the Hell I elephone Com- 
pany in his home town. Chicago. During his stay here, he was a well-liked 
member of the Fourteenth Company for whom he played soccer in the fall. In 
the winter. Smitty was kept busy wirh the Masc|ueraders. Whenever rhere 
was a bridge game, that is where you could rind Smitty. Although he has not 
written a book on the subject yet, he considered himself quite an expert on 
point count bidding. Smitty will be remembered for having a good joke at 
the right rime. 



JAMES WILLIAM SMITH 




Sumiitr, Mary/and 



A graduate of St. John's High School and Bullis Prep school in Washington, 
D.C., Jim came to the Naval Academy via Congressional appointment. Prior 
to entering Navy. "Smitty" spent two vears in rhe Naval Reserve. \\ hile in 
high school and prep school he lettered in foorball and baseball. I his experience 
helped him as he gave his best to Max Bishop's diamond squad during his 
stay ar Navy. Jim will always be remembered for his cheerful smile, and his 
willingness to help anyone. His capacity for Navy chow ranks with the seven 
wonders of the world. Whatever the team in the future, Jim will undoubtedly 
be an asset to it with his fine character. 



UNITED STATES 



392 





JAMES WALKER SMITH Granada, Mississippi 

Smitty" came to the Academy after spending a happy year at Mississippi 
State. At first, he was baffled by all the new fangled rules and regulations, but 
he quickly became adjusted to the rigors of military life. Never much of a 
slash, he more than made up for it on the athletic field. His athletic ability 
made him a star in every sport he played. He showed triple threat ability in 
company football, his favorite sport. Smitty, a staunch Rebel, claims the South 
is God's country. Eventempered, Smitty never gets riled at anything. His se- 
cret ambition is to raise cotton on the flight deck of the Forrestal. 



NORMAN MARSHALL SMITH 



Kensington, Maryland 



Anyone who knew Norm at the Academy knew of his famous bagpipes. 
Norm entered USNA from St. Andrew's School in Middletown, Delaware. As 
a Plebe he soon developed an extreme dislike for spareribs and scrambled eggs. 
With his first gold stripe, Norm surprised everyone by appearing with a dif- 
ferent drag every weekend! Second Class year brought the painful 2/c swim- 
ming test, but it was then that he first came in contact with his favorite sub- 
ject — ordnance. Norm's sports' interests have centered around crew. His ample 
professional knowledge is most noticeable in matters concerning sailing vessels 
and submarines. To Norm we wish the best for his future in the Service. 





PHILLIP JAX SMITH 



LaGrange, Georgi 



Only after a nine-month fling at LaGrange College, the third oldest women's 
college in the United States, did Smitty settle down to Navy life. Here he 
found the worst part of Plebe year was the frequent request for a rendition of 
the old Yankee anthem "Marching Through Georgia." After a year of such 
trials, however, he found things going smoothly. Being a Varsity swimmer, he 
soon became known for his 4.0's on the swimming tests. Then, during second 
class year, came fame. Smitty's picture appeared on the front cover of a na- 
tional girls magazine. Though his hat-size may have changed a little, we will 
always remember him as the modest go-getter from Georgia. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



393 








UNITED STATES 



RICHARD EDWARD SMITH 



Roswfll, New Mexico 



Dick came ro Navy after two years of Sigma Chi and NROTC at the Uni- 
versity of New Mexico. Although he missed the beer busts and parties of col- 
lege hie, Dick's ability to adjust to the situation at hand was evidenced by the 
«:iv in which he entered into activities while here. A yen for water sports kept 
him out for \ arsin Swimming until second class year; when he gave it up to 
devote all his time to editing the LUCKY BAG. Naturally curious and an 
easy learner, be was able to keep stars and still save plenty of time for relaxa- 
tion. Dick could always be counted on to do his best in whatever be tried for 
he never went half-way on anything. 




WILLIAM ROBERT SMITH 



Pensacola, Florida 



Vfter spending a yeai at Marion Institute, Hob joined the ranks at L'SNA 
with all the enthusiasm commonly accorded new Plebes. He was well prepared 
for \eadcmv routine by bis father's thirty years of Navj life. His quick wit- 
tedness and his theory of "brain over brawn" quickly earned him the title of 
"Dim n Fox." Being the outdoor type, Hob spent some rime on the cross 
count!*) and Steeplechase teams. After giving up tbc more strenuous sports, 
he spent much rime enlivening the afternoon on the yawl with Ins easy con- 
versation. No outstanding dislikes and an ability to meet people are the hall- 
marks ot the Desert Fox. 



RICHARD CLARE SNYDER 



Easto n , /'<ii nsylva n ia 



Dick, as he is commonly called by bis many friends, spent a year in the 
Naval Reserve and nine months ar Wyoming Seminary Prep previous to 
entering the \cadcmv. Four years at the Academy did not dent bis casual, 
friendly, easy going attitude. Always ready with a smile, be bad the philosophy 
that things could always be worse. Sports were his first love after his many 
( ) \( )'s, and playing on the Varsity Football and Baseball teams took up much 
of bis spare time. A good student, Dick never let his studies get the upperhand. 




594 




NAVAL ACADEMY 





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STEPHEN ARTHUR SOLTESZ 



South Nonvalk, Connecticut 



Steve entered the Academy upon his graduation from Nonvalk High School. 
He soon earned the nickname of "Salty," as a result of falling into the Severn 
River during Plebe summer sailing. His ambitious attitude never faltered dur- 
ing Plebe year, and he was kept alive by a good supply of Apple Strudel sent 
from home. If you ever wanted a person to laugh at vour jokes, Steve was your 
man. Many evenings would find him playing "Scaramouche" in the Fencing 
Loft. His speed and height were also put to good use on the company volley- 
ball court. Steve always did well in academics, but still found time to drag 
queens on the weekends. At the hops he could usually be found practicing a 
new step with his girl. 







FRED GEORGE SPELLM AN 



Alva, Oklahoma 



Undoubtedly the easiest man in the world to get to know, Fred leaves Navy 
as he entered; assured that no place from Rio to Halifax can top his own 
Sooner state. Three years of college at Northwestern State and his own con- 
stant alertness enabled Fred to outwit and outmaneuver the various depart- 
ments at Navy, and to emerge, relatively unscathed, at the top of the heap. 
Despite the fact that he always found time to have a cup of coffee with a 
friend, Fred was constantly active while at the Academy. Four years of Choir, 
Glee Club and Newman Club filled the evenings while the Sailing Team saw 
most of his afternoons. 



PETER JOSEPH SPINK 



Schenectady, New York 



Pete entered the Naval Academy with an excellent background of four 
years of Navy life. Having spent two years on destroyers with the Med Fleet 
and rapidly advancing to Radarman 2/c, Pete put his knowhow to work and 
quickly mastered Academy routine. Wrestling and boxing were his standouts, 
but Pete proved his ability in any field of sports he attempted. Always ready 
with a quick smile, and a joke to fit any situation, Pete was welcome on any 
activity. Sincerity, conscientiousness, and drive are assets to put Pete on top 
wherever he may go. 






395 







WALTER HENRY STAMMER JR. 



Fresno, California 



Vfter graduation from Bellarmine high school in San Jose, Walt attended 
Stanford University for a year and a hall before coming cast to Navy. He 
brought with him a smile and a cordial "Hi-dee'* for Ins many new friends. 
Though Walt was fond of conversation, he never opened his month before 
breakfast except to insert a cigarette. With his keen enthusiasm and partici- 
pation in sports, love for classical writing, shrewd bridge playing and a subtle 
sense of humor, Walt was a popular member of the Brigade. 



BEN LUTES STEELE 



Liberal, Kan tas 



\ Jayhawker from Liberal, Kansas, Ben came to the Naval Academy after 

graduating from high school and spending two years in the \ir Force. Ben 
must ba\e received a good deal of training on humor and the art of getting the 
straight facts, for he was known throughout the Academy as the man with the 
big smile and the "Straight Skinny." \\ bile at the Academy Ben's favorite 
subject was the Bull course, and he always managed to put in a good per- 
formance. \\ ithout a doubt, anyone would like to have Ben as a shipmate. 



£. 




CHRISTOPHER MARCUS STEFANOU 



Norfolk, Virginia 



Chris arrived at Navy via a Reserve appointment, and upon entering, found 
ample room to practice his favorite sports. Whether it was football or track, 
Chris was in the midst of it all, giving his best for Navy. Not very handy with 
a slide rule or log tables, he put in his share of effort to stay a healthy distance 
above the 2.5 low water mark. Although he feared exams, he always came 
through. Outside of sports and studies. Chris spent his time involved in the 
mysteries of the stock market and the fairer sex. His drive was the main factor 
that carried him to success in whatever he undertook. 



UNITED STATES 



396 





SUfe 



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Ofcte^^ 



JOHN CORYDON STERLING 



Benton Harbor, Michigan 



During his four year sojourn, John enjoyed playing football for the Bat- 
talion and the 150 lb. company teams, was known for banging his knees on the 
hurdles when the track season came around, and sailed a fair track with NA 
yawls in his spare time. Among John's many extracurricular activities were 
foreign affairs, Choir (he claimed he sang tenor) and helping the Trident Mag- 
azine roll off the presses. His hornrimmed glasses and impeccable dress gave 
him that professional collegiate look. Helpful and dependable, John was char- 
acterized by thoroughness in his work. 



CONNELLY DAVID STEVENSON 



Farminglon, Connecticut 



A conservative New Englander, Con had woven into his background a 
Scottish ancestry, studies at the University of New Hampshire — liberal arts, 
of course — and many a good time with Alpha Tau Omega. It was no surprise 
that from the start he was a Bull and Dago cut, because he was an enthusiastic 
reader. He played both tennis and squash well, and had a strong affinity for 
liberty in Philadelphia. On the lighter side, Con was an avid member of the 
"Thank God It's Friday Club," and a collector of hand knitted socks. Now 
that his midshipman cap has been thrown high into the rafters of Dahlgren 
Hall, the word to Con from all his friends is — Good Luck. 





WILLIAM HOWARD STEWA RT 



Dayton, Ohio 



Stew came to the Naval Academy from the aviation center of the country, 
Dayton, Ohio, where he acquired an avid interest in flying. Stew brought with 
him a wealth of tales, yet to be topped by anyone. After being "Joe College" 
for a year at Cincinnati University he felt the call of duty in his blood, and left 
behind many broken hearts and nights of uproarious laughter, according to 
his many fabulous stories. While at the Academy, Stew became an accom- 
plished bridge player and sports prognosticator. He particularly enjoyed fol- 
lowing his former alma mater's "Bearcats." along with all the Navy teams. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



397 








UNITED STATES 



WILLIAM HENRY STILES Cartersville, Georgia 

Bill never tried to keep it a secret that he came from the heart of the uni- 
verse, deep in the land of cotton. His first act upon arriving at the Naval 
\cademy was to sign up for the Plehe Crew Team, and he developed into one 
"I Rusr\ Callow's top hands with an oar. I lis favorite course, by far, was Hull 
and his extracurricular activities included debating, the Foreign Relations 
Club, and membership in the French Club, "Just to keep in shape." Always 
easy to recognize by his shock of red hair, ready smile, and animated conver- 
sation. Mill fulfilled his desire to graduate with the same good humored out- 
look on life with which he entered. 




JAMES WALTER STINSON Port Huron, Michigan 

Coming from Port Huron in the heart of tin ( ln.it I. .ikes region, Jim has 
been interested fn boats and sailing for a long time. \t Navy, many of his 
afternoons and weekends wire spent yawl sailing, and in 1954 he took part in 
the Newport to Bermuda race. Besides sailing, he also liked handball, swim- 
ming, tennis, golf, and especially dragging. Jim came to the Naval Academy 
after attending Port Huron High School, prep school at Marion Milit.M \ 
Institute m Alabama, and the University of Michigan. A good worker, he 
spent a lot of time luffing the books, and his seemingly endless energy helped 
him to do all his tasks well. 



LEO WARREN STOCKHAM 



Hutchinson, Kansas 



In i came from the Hat Plains of Kansas, and as a result, could never navi- 
gate the hilly curved streets of Crabtown with any degree of accuracy. He 
established himself as one of the "true blue" clan, spending much of his time 
writing anil calling that certain girl back home. He liked to consider himself 
hard but fair with the Plebes. but it was rumored among the fourth class that 
he was mostly hard and hardly fair. A lover of western music, I.eo spent many 
hours trying to convert his "eastern dude" wife to the merits of Eddie Arnold. 
But he will best be remembered for his deep sincerity and easy going manner. 





77* 




398 




NAVAL ACADEMY 



DONALD ROB EN STON E 

Don moved around quite a bit during his formative years, before making 
River Forest his home. He was a very versatile lad at Navy, and proved this 
by being both an outstanding Varsity Soccer player, and a star in the class- 
room. Don, sometimes dubbed "Chico," was always friendly, dependable, and 
willing to give a hand. He was serious at the right time, and could swiftly go 
to the opposite extreme with good effect when the opportunity presented it- 
self. All this added up to making many friends, both Mid and drag. This 
popularity was well deserved, however, for Don was always able to put him- 
self in the other fellow's shoes, and be considerate and understanding. 




LOWELL PERRY STONE Arlington, Virginia 

Although Perry's home is Arlington, he spent his high school years in Cali- 
fornia, and later lived for two years in London. Sports are his hobby, with 
golf, hunting, fishing and skiing heading the list. As a track man he was 
noted for being his company's best runner. With a mind for engineering. Perry 
had little trouble with academics at the Academy. Possessing an amiable per- 
sonality, he liked to get into any group, and he felt at home there immediately. 
But when a warranting occasion arose, he was ready with level-headed and 
sincere advice. 



DANIEL LABBEE SULLIVAN 



Providence, Rhode Island 



"Danny Boy" ventured onto the campus a more than inspired Physics stu- 
dent from Providence College. Thenceforth, his golden Irish tenor voice could 
be heard resounding throughout mother Bancroft. A good sport, always read)' 
to give and take a joke, Dan's spirit always kept up the morale as we whiled 
away our time by the Severn. Dan exemplified this fighting spirit time and 
time again, both on the Battalion football and waterpolo teams, by playing 
right up to the last minute. A versatile student, academics came easily to him, 
and, in fact, made one think that he was the proud possessor of a self-lubricat- 
ing shpstick. 





1^^ 

%, 



399 






GENE FERRALL SULLIVAN 



Jackso 11, M ississi p pi 



Gene arrived ar the Academy fresh from the land of Magnolias and belles, 
and the NROTC unir at rlu- University "(Mississippi. Coming from the heart 
of the Sunny South, he had a difficult time with rlu- Crabtown mist, especially 
on tin- weekends. Vcademics offered him little resistance and he was always 
willing to help a shipmate « irh a difficult problem. \ connoisseur ol fine coffee, 
Gene aw airs patiently the return of the nickel cup of Java. During the Spring, 
he spent his time with the Navy Baseball Team as its hard working manager. 
He was known for the efficient manner in which lie carried out any task that 
was given to him. 



PHILIP LONG SULLIVAN 



Washington, D.C 



To I 'In I it w as natural for him to come to rlu " I rade School." since his lather 
is an old grad out of the Class of '27. Phil came ro the Academy alter prepping 
at Bullis, and Roosevelt High School. Ihs main problem always seemed ro be 
how to drag so many "queens" on so little money. During rlu- Fall and Spring 
he could usually be found out on the tennis courts. Plehe year Phil met his 
Waterloo on the Obstacle Course. The first week of Plehe year he fell oft the 
Pyramid, and spent the semester, rill well after the Army Game, taking it easy 
in the Hospital. Phil, famous lor his sea stories and ready smile, could always 
be relied upon to enliven a party. 




RICHARD SWANENBURG West Chester, Pennsylvania 

Swanny arrived at the Naval Academy after a semester of college life with 
the Rig Red of Cornell, and a tour of duty with the Marine Corps in Korea. I le 
returned, after seeing much action, wearing rhe purple heart. If ever anyone 
wanted to hear a story of some poor broken hearted girl "big blonde headed 
Swanny" was the man to see, for he believed in the theory "cheaper by the 
dozen." Athletics came easy for Swanny. so he spent his time on the lacrosse 
fields at the Naval Academy and the football fields at Cornell and NAPS. He 
had the ability to talk himself in and our of anything, and always had a cheer- 
ful word for those dark davs ar L SNA. 



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4111 





HARLAN DAVID SWANSON, JR 



A noxville, Tennessee 



After graduating from high school, H. D. entered the University of Tenn- 
essee at Knoxville, with intentions of pursuing a military career. He reached 
the rank of Captain in the ROTC, and became a member of the Scabbard and 
Blade, an honorary military society. With a three year background in Chemical 
Engineering, H. D. entered the Naval Academy. He well earned the star on his 
full dress collar, and proved himself a fierce competitor in intramural athletics. 
Respected and admired by all, he constantly displayed a willingness to aid 
others in their problems and academic pitfalls. Judging by his enthusiasm for 
Naval History, H. D. has built well his foundation for the future. 



CLARENCE ORVILLE TAFF, JR. 



Oroville, California 



Joe, well known by all as "the clown prince of Bancroft" entered the Naval 
Academy via the fleet. Being a true Navy man, Joe gave claim to various 
Naval Stations throughout the world as his legal domicile. His lettered B-robe 
was proof positive of his ability and interest in sports. Despite his clowning, 
special attention to his OAO, and many outside interests, he managed to re- 
main above average in academics. Versatility was his byword and with that 
stick-to-it attitude, Joe ranked with the finest. 





JOSEPH TRU ITT TALBERT, JR 



Coronado, California 



Joe came to Canoe U. from Southern California after a two year tour at 
Boyden's in San Diego. Coming from a Navy family, Joe was right at home at 
USNA where he was a member of the Plebe Swimming Team. During his first 
two years at Navy, Joe spent most of his time swimming and fencing. His 
last two years saw a major change in his extra-curricular activities, with 
dragging a close second to his first love, the water. Before he came to the 
Academy, Joe was very active in the hot-rod circles of California, but his time 
was diverted when he joined the Reserves. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



401 








UNITED STATES 



RICHARD RAY TARBUCK 



Coronado, California 



Dick, being a Navy Junior, came to I SNA well indoctrinated in the prin- 
ciples of naval discipline. At the Academy, like all Mids, his day was governed 
by the call of Bancroft hells. On leave, however, his life was governed by the 
call of the surf on one of the nearby beaches. His favorite pastimes included 
surfing and, of course, beach parties. A graduate of Coronado High, he entered 
via a presidential appointment. Deep sincerity, a pleasant demeanor, and an 
irrepressible Blue and Gold spirit made him an outstanding midshipman and 
a sure bet to cany on the Tarbuck nail it ion of excellence in naval performance. 



FRANK BUCK T A TOM 



Montgomery, Alabama 




\ rebel from the deep Smith. Frank came to the Academy as a tender lad 
fresh out "I high school. \ natural knack for studying made academics easy 
for him, and he found plenty of spare time for his favorite pastimes: dragging, 
listening to music and playing that terrible game of chess. Intramural sports 
were a serious matter to this fellow, and he was in there fighting whether it 
was soccer, steeplechase, track, or wrestling. When Frank was not otherwise 
occupied, he could usually he found in the middle of a hot debate on practically 
any subnet. Uong with a serious nature. Frank possessed a keen sense of 
humor, the combination of which marked a successful sr.i\ at Navy. 



JAMES MARLIN TAYLOR 



Poltsville, Pen nsylva n ia 



( >ne of Pottsville's finest and most loyal sons, Jim found tin Academy an 
environment entirely to his liking. Endowed with a superior intellect and 
possessing a real /est for study, he easily conquered every academic obstacle. 
His devotion to being successful in every respect manifested itself in the many 
and varied activities that claimed his abilities. One of the rare, fortunate 
individuals who has been granted with not one, but many talents, he employed 
them well at I SNA preparing in every way for a service career. Whatever the 
future holds, Jim will meet it with confidence born of a willingness to utilize 
all his capabilities. 



402 






NAVAL ACADEMY 



THEODORE WILLIAM TAYLOR Washington, D.C. 

A Marine junior and native of Denver, Ted began his military career as a 
cadet at Anacostia High. He attained the rank of Cadet Colonel, and that ex- 
plains his unusual nickname. Colonel's graduation brought the realization of 
his life long ambition — a Marine Corps commission. He was as well known in 
the Natatorium as on the Flying Squadron. Among his other hobbies were hunt- 
ing and fishing, and appearing as "Cover Boy" for "Seventeen" magazine. His 
outstanding bearing, ability to give and take orders, and his knack of getting 
along with his associates make us proud to serve with him. 




DAVID STANLEY TEACHOUT 



Detroit, Michigan 



Dave was born in Sandusky, Michigan, and spent the next several years 
moving back and forth between Ohio and Michigan, before settling down in 
Detroit. In high school Dave's major interest was music. This was only be- 
cause his father and brother were both musicians. After high school, Dave at- 
tended Wayne University for one and a half years before joining the Navy. It 
was during his tour of duty aboard the submarine Trutta that Dave became 
fascinated by submarine duty. While at the Academy, Dave found time to 
participate in the extra-curricular activities of Varsity Pistol, Cross Country, 
and the Battalion track teams. 



RICHMOND BRITTON TERRELL 



Cairo, Illinois 



The Naval Academy did not change the easy-going, carefree manner that 
Dick brought with him from Phi Delta Theta at Miami U. However, he did 
admit that there was a big difference between USNA and college life — the 
amount of liberty. He was an excellent swimmer and helped pull many of us 
through our lifesaving tests. Occasionally he would complain about academics, 
but that was because he never studied. Most of his athletic ability was con- 
centrated on intramural sports, a pastime that didn't interfere with his social 
life. Where the parties were gayest, the music the softest, and the corners the 
darkest, Dick could always be found. 






403 






GEORGE PAUL TEXTOR 



Pasadena, Calif or n ia 



George came to the \cadcm\ after two years of junior college at Pasadena 
K'\w College, where he obtained his \ssociate of Arts. Football was oik- of his 
chief interests as evidenced by Ins winning a varsitj "X" in football. As Navy's 
extra point kicker, George proved that even a guard can consistently break 
into the scoring column. Possessed with a pleasing personality ami a line sense 
of humor, George got along well with his classmates. Mis football prowess 
canus over into everyday life where he tackles problems with an enviable 
ease anil assurance. 



JAMES GRANT THOMAS 



San Marino, California 



A native Californian, Jim came to the Academy after spending fifteen 
months in the Naval Reserve. Using high school experience to good advantage, 
he became a manager ol the Navy \ arsitv Football team. An extremely likable 
person. Jim had little trouble with Plebe year, and was able to adapt himself 
quickly and easily to military life. Famous for his unfailing supply of mail, 
Jim also enjoyed writing. Although not a natural born scholar. Jim, through 
perseverance and hard work overcame the standard academic pitfalls with 
little difficulty to emerge at the end of four years well ahead of the game. 




RICHARD LEE THOMAS 



Towner, North Dakota 



Dick attended Northwestern Preparatory School in Minneapolis for a vear 
prior to his entrance to the Naval Academy. He liked sports very much and 
participated in handball and basketball, though he liked better to talk of 
hunting and fishing back home in those "Dakota hills." Dick liked to drag the 
gals from the neighboring cities and was always looking for the letters which 
followed. Often, when the letters arrived, he was very much elated and it took 
a week to get him back down from the clouds. Academics posed no great prob- 
lem, for he seemed to understand the required matter as well as he understood 
the art of making friends. 



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BENTON GEORGE THOMPSON 



Fremont, Nebraska 



This long, tall Nebraskan gained his entrance to the Academy through the 
Naval Academy Prep School at Bainbridge. Ben, a natural at the game of 
basketball, fell right into place with the Navy cagers winning both Plebe and 
Varsity letters. Although a big man, he never used his size to gain his way: 
but was always good natured and ready to lend a helping hand. His natural 
ability to refrain from "sweating" the system substantially inhibited the 
growth of grey hairs during his four years. Ben's personality put him on every- 
one's party list, and he was never the one to refuse any such occasion. 



JOHN DAVIS THURBER 



Montezuma, Iowa 



In 1952, John was one of the new Plebes who had already had a good look 
at military life. Prior to his enlistment in the Navy, in 1951, "Thurb" had 
been an outstanding athlete in high school, and had attended Iowa State 
College for two years under a football scholarship. A great outdoors man, he 
spent his two most enjoyable summers working for the U.S. Forest Service in 
Idaho. His favorite pastime, beyond a doubt, was the relating of his glorious 
days as an Iowa farm boy. Never one to let the academics get him down, he 
was best known for his prowess on many of the Battalion and company sports 
teams. 





BARRICK FRANK TIBBITTS 



Annapolis, Maryland 



Although he called Annapolis his home, Barry, like most other Navy 
Juniors, can list at least three dozen one time residences. With a couple of 
captains and an admiral in his lineage, it seemed natural that Barry should 
end up at the Academy. Afternoons at the Academy he could be found on 
upper Lawrence Field managing the Varsity Soccer teams. His familiar scream 
"That answer book is wrong again" indicated only that the duty slide rule was 
in error. Barry managed to hold on to his starring grades despite an occasional 
explosion in Juice Lab. He spent more time running his wives than the Plebes, 
and his contributions to humor will always be his pride and our joy. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



405 








UNITED STATES 



ISADORE LARTIGUE TOBIN. Ill 



Florence, South Carolina 



Tigue began his formal military education with a year at Alabama's Marion 
Institute, and then came North for four years at USNA. During Plebe year 
he often regretted that journey, as he sang "Marching Through Georgia" 
thrice daily. Plebe year soon passed, however, and Tigue got used to existence 
up North. Tigue never had any real trouble- with academics, and never let 
studies stand in the way of a good time. A true Southerner, he could always be 
counted on to perk up any of tin- numerous parties he attended. After class 
he was usually found around the Varsity Tennis courts. An avid fan and 
capable manager, he contributed much to the spirit of the team. 




EDWARD LAWRENCE TOOHEY. JR 



Bridgeport, Con necticut 



With :t Naval Reserve appointment, "Easj Ed" journeyed from Bridge- 
port, Connecticut to join the Class of 1956. Afternoons would find Ed with 
tin- company cross country or steeplechase teams unless the instruction pool 
called for a session of "up. mit. and together." However, Ed's real interest was 
photography and he spent much time in the dark room. He was an active 
member of the Photography Club and offered his talents to the LUCKY 
BAG'S photo staff. \s tin result of bis fondness of reading, Ed comes well 
versed in a wide variety of fields. His willingness and desire to do a job well 
can always be counted on. 



DONALD NELSON TOPPING 



IVellman, Iowa 



Big " 1 opper" came to Annapolis from Wellman. low a. Before entering the 
Academy, he spent two years at Iowa Wesleyan where he studied the pre-med 
course. Being a member of the Phi Delta Theta's at Iowa, he soon found out, 
to his dismay, that there just weren't any fraternity parties at the Academy. 
His presence anywhere was usually made obvious by the sound of his boom- 
ing voice. Don spent most of his spare time at athletics, to which he was well 
adapted. He always attacked any problem with a stubborn persistence that 
led to an attainment of almost any goal he set for himself. 




406 




NAVAL ACADEMY 



JAMES BAILEY TOWNS END 




Ripon, California 



By the time Jim found his way to the Academy he already had quite a bit 
of college behind him, and hence had developed the technique of utilizing his 
time to the best advantage. He had evidently been impressed by Erroll Flynn 
at some time or other for he spent many of his free afternoons in the fencing 
loft. His hobby was collecting firearms and he had several rifles and pistols 
placed at strategic locations about the room. Dragging at USNA never ap- 
pealed to Jim very much, but when he was away from the bells of Bancroft, 
he didn't mind a little feminine companionship. Though Jim never said much, 
he left no doubt in our minds that he knew where he was going in life. 




ANTHONYTRENT Los Angeles, California 

Tony was another one of those typical Californians — plenty of sport coats, 
slacks, and a beat up jalopy to look forward to on leave. Tony will be remem- 
bered for his diversified choice of magazines; his room always looked like the 
corner magazine store, the shelves being filled with magazines of every variety. 
Others will remember Tony for his choice of cigars; it seemed as if he was 
trying to emulate Winston Churchill. Tony's favorite sports were sailing and 
firing his rifle. It is hoped that he will be able to sail the Navy's ships as well 
as he sailed the Academy's Yawls, and fire the Navy's guns as well as he fired 
his rifle. 



RICHARD PAUL TUCKER 



Tulsa, Oklahoma 



Tuck came straight from high school in Tulsa to start making a name for 
himself here at Navy Tech. His determination paid off well, for he not only 
managed to rate those little stars on his full dress, but became a Varsity 
Wrestler as well. Tuck had to lose a lot of weight to make the team, and his 
baggy blues were his trademark during wrestling season. Like all of us, he 
fancied himself a ladies-man, and devoted a lot of time to a scientific study of 
female complexities. A quiet, hard-working fellow, he managed to get whatever 
needed to be done, done a little better than average, and earned the respect of 
all of us. 






407 






MAURICE FRANCIS TYLER. JR. Dreu\ Mississippi 

Leaving behind his whin- bucks and plaid vest, Maurice came ro join the 
ranks of '56. Hailing from Drew, Mississippi, he attended Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity, the University of Mississippi, and Memphis Stare College before 
coming to I SN \. While in college he was a member of Alpha Tau Omega 
Fraternity and was a member of the N R< > I C program. Maurice brought with 
him from the Deep South a likeable personality and a keen sense of humor. 
Always active in company sports, he developed exceptional competitive spirit 
and was at bis best when competition was sharpest. Able and intelligent, 
Maurice makes a line addition to the service. 



JAMES MERLE VAN METRE 



Gaithersburg, Maryland 



Jim's indoctrination into the ways of the Navy started when be attended 
the \cadcmv Kindergarten School. Horn in Annapolis, Jim spent most of his 
school days in Gaithersburg, Maryland. In addition to being president of the 
student body, be finished high school at the top of his class. Silent and amiable, 
Jim cultivated friendship easily and was well liked by everyone. He was reg 
without being strict, always diligent and hard-working. Jim's scholastic stand- 
ing and his participation in Academy activities evidenced his keen desire to 
further his career. 



CHARLES DUANE VAN RY 



Mason City, Iowa 



After a year at the University of Iowa where he became well adjusted to 
fraternity life at Phi Gamma Delta, Chuck left to settle down to the four year 
grind of the Academy. His scientific interests, casualness, and imperturbability 
lent themselves quite well to the system. Moreover, his active participation in 
high school athletics enabled him to be a mainstay in intramural ISO lb. foot- 
ball and track. During his free time, Chuck liked to drag, read, or just relax; 
but when leave time arrived, he was one of the first to make tracks. Once he 
reached home, he managed to sandwich a little hunting and fishing between 
dates. 






^ 




UNITED STATES 



408 




RICHARD STUART VA RN EY 



Silver Spring, Maryland 



Dick was about the only man who never complained about the Maryland 
weather. Having lived in Silver Spring for the past fifteen years, he was im- 
mune to it. While others groaned, Dick always smiled, a characteristic that 
became invaluable to him in a tense situation. In him, Navy had more than a 
staunch rooter, and his weekend wasn't complete without a Navy victory. He 
carried that same fire and spirit with him onto the athletic field and into the 
natatonum, where he needed it the most. Just as the Naval Academy posed 
little of a problem to Dick, so will his future career. 



ROBERT FRED VASELENKO 



Williston, North Dakota 



Vas entered the Academy after attending North Dakota State one year and 
Northwestern Preparatory School in Minneapolis for part of another. Vas 
liked football, basketball, hunting, and fishing best of all his pastimes. His 
interest in football as evident, as he participated in Plebe football, Junior 
Varsity during his Youngster year, and Varsity team as a tackle second class 
year. Academics provided no great hardships for Vas, as he possessed the 
ability to grasp basic fundamentals with a minimum of effort. Mathematics 
would be his choice for the most enjoyable course. 





WILFREDO DINO VIRAY 



Prieto Diaz, Sorsogon, Philippic 



A man of varied interests and abilities, Willie was endowed with a very 
pleasing personality, and was warm and friendly. Behind his innocent mien 
was a mischief few could equal. A guy who always got away with his escapades, 
Willie never admitted that he was second to anyone in anything. A game of 
golf was Willie's favorite, and gave him the chance to excel. Willie also dis- 
tinguished himself in academics in spite of his hatred for studying. Willie took 
life easy, but still, he did a great job on whatever he was entrusted to do. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



409 








UNITED STATES 



JAMES RAYMOND VISAGE 



Chicago, Illinois 



When Jim first came to the Naval Academy, he had already had a good 
look at military life. After a couple of years on his "Paradise of the Pacific," 
Guam, he decided to make Annapolis his next stop. Jim's favorite pastime, 
beyond a doubt, was the telling and retelling of the glorious tales of the Old 
Navj days. \side from the academics, Jim spent bis spare moments keeping 
trim in the gym, with a little company volleyball and basketball in his off 
seasons. With bis motto, "Play it cool," and being a true believer iii variety, 
In could never understand the guy who was preoccupied with one girl. 



JOHN ALBERT WAGNER 



Lebanon, Pennsylvania 




John joined the Brigade after four years of service in tin- Navy, and from 
the outsit In- was the Academy's answer to Sydney Greenstrcet. John must 
have come from a family that never rushed or worried, for many were the 
nights just before the finals that be would retire early, just to rest up enough 
fin tin next rough day. Maybe John wasn't the original "Red Mike," but he 
\\;is probably one of tin- best examples that the Academy lias ever seen. John 
was a busj man during bis stay here, for the Catholic Choir was graced with 
his singing voice every Sunday and the Conditioning Squad was equally 
graced with bis presence during the week days. 



BRIAN FRANCIS WALKER Livona, Michigan 

While attending Catholic Central High School. Doak was one of the top 
students in bis class and was \thlete of the Year, Immediately after gradua- 
tion, he came into contact with the Navy and Plebe summer, and the world 
to him was no longer a bed of roses. He made it though, however, and never 
let it be said that he didn't make full use of the opportunity to visit the excit- 
ing country of Brazil. Doak was usually found with his trusty camera in every 
possible place that could be photographed, and always took great pleasure in 
showing his assortment of pictures. His time here was centered around math, 
Batt football, and the current 0A0. 




410 




NAVAL ACADEMY 



RICHARD SHERIDAN WALSH 




Annapolis, Maryland 



Being a Navy Junior, it was not uncommon for Dick, better known as 
Waldo, to pack his gear for respotting across the country. Coming from Severn 
Prep School across the river, he brought many little witticisms, large amounts 
of sea lore, and small amounts of hair. Dick was very popular at the Academy, 
and served as class representative and company commander. Athletically, he 
spent his time at the old Indian game — lacrosse. When looking for Waldo, 
either look for the shiny bald head, or listen for the tapping of the cane and 
the banging of the cup. 




COM PTON EUGENE WARD 



Crystal City, Missouri 



Gene hails from the little town with all the glass, and he spent a year at the 
University of Missouri before he came to the Academy. Like all the troops, 
Gene looked forward to leave and had a hard time dividing his time between 
hunting with Dad, dazzling friends in the hometown with Navy blue, and 
courting les femmes he met in the East. Experience gave him three unfailing 
maxims; bridge is cheaper than poker, the best drink is a free one, and main- 
tain the 3.0 and coast in. His ambition is a two year tour of Paris to practice 
his two year mastery of French and studv the finer arts. 



GLENN ALLEN WARNER 



H u m melstown, Pennsylva n ia 



Glenn first journeyed to Bullis Prep, and a year later passed the USNA 
entrance exams. His first impression of the Academy and its rigid time schedule 
gave indications that his inclination to sleep a lot was shattered for good. 
However, he managed to sneak in quite a few hours of rack time during his 
four years. "Goog," a name acquired through the careful discretion of his 
roommate, excelled in football and basketball in high school, and was equally 
successful in these sports here. His excellent character and bearing impressed 
even the casual observer. 





411 






RICHARD HAWKS WARREN Binghamton, New York 

Dick came to the Academj straight from Binghamton Central High School. 
Although rumor had it that Dick \\ as the inventor of the slide- rule- rli;ir lights 
up with the right answer, it was an established fact that he was never too busy 
to ha\e a good laugh, or give help to a classmate that needed it. W hile at the 
Academy Dick was forever saying no to expectant hopefuls who asked him if 
he was related to the Warren sisters of California. Dick's main interest at 
Vi\\ was swimming, in which he never had the troubles which befell some of 
us. By organizing his efforts efficiently, Dick makes a valuable addition to 
anv organization. 

ROBERT LEWIS WATKINS Edmond, Oklahoma 

After suffering several broken bones in the wrestling loft, Hob decided that 
he didn't belong with the bone crushers of USN \. However, his roommates 
will testify to his great ability in that particular sport. Dubbed "Moose" by 
his classmates, he was always ready and willing to shoulder the responsibilities 
heaped upon him in company elections. He called Oklahoma home, and every 
football season found him following his favorite team, the "Sooners;" that is 
when he wasn't planning how he was going to spend his Christmas leave. 
W hether it was his size or the way he played the guitar that won him his nick- 
name can't be determined, but that "Moose" is a great guy. 



JOHN ALDEN WEBSTER. JR. 




Norfolk, Vh 



John's ambition was to follow in the footsteps of his father, a Naval officer, 
and go down to the sea in ships. His main interest has been boats ever since 
he told his younger brother, "Let me show you how to paddle your raft." John 
did, but in the inverted position. This tall blond headed southerner, with that 
everlasting crew cut and innocent tender look, had spent his free time building. 
tearing down and re-building his pride and joy- an inboard motor boat. His 
sacrifices and determination to get things done, no matter what the price, 
was shown in the time and energy spent on any and everything he took part 
in. He loved sports, with the ISO lb. crew team being his favorite. 



UNITED STATES 




412 




EDGA R WAYNE WEEKS. JR. 



Thomasville, Georgia 



Wayne entered the Naval Academy after spending two years at Georgia 
Tech, studying ceramic engineering. Hailing from the deep South, Wayne was 
always being kidded about his drawl. In fact, many of his friends wanted to 
get an interpreter to translate for him. Never having any trouble with his 
academics, he often spent many study hours explaining the inner workings of 
Skinny. Wayne was a favorite member of that legion which is still saying, "Save 
your Confederate money . . ." 



DAVID WEGGELAND 



Van Nuys, California 



Having completed a year at UCLA as a chemistry major, Dave decided to 
continue his career at the Academy. He calls it the most important single deci- 
sion of his life, and he never regretted giving up the Naval Reserve for the 
Regular Navy. Dave is an admirer of Los Angeles, smog included. Van Nuys 
is only a segment of that big city, but a wonderful place to call home. At the 
Academy, Dave was a member in the Foreign Relations and Spanish Club, 
and he considers Dago the best course taught here. For hobbies, he is an ardent 
gun collector and dabbles in amateur astronomy whenever he gets the chance. 





RUSSELL HOWARD WEIDMAN 



Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania 



Russ came to the "Scenic School-on-the-Severn" after spending a year at 
the University of Pittsburgh. It must have been a year well spent, for the 
academics here didn't seem to slow him down too much. Russ was interested 
in all sports, but could be found playing football in the winter, and softball 
in the spring. He could always be counted on to come up with something 
humorous except when a derogatory remark was made about "his" Pittsburgh, 
"The Golden City of the East." Although he was district manager for home 
smog removers, he insisted that smog didn't exist in the "Smokey City." Russ 
was a very ambitious man and never failed to impress people on first acquaint- 
ance. 



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41: 








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GEORGE WARREN WEIGOLD. JR 



White Plains. New York 



"Sail, sail, sail!" This was the constant cry of George while he was at the 
Naval Academy. He spent almost all of his free time in a dinghy on the Severn, 
sailing around the course in front of almost everybody. George spent more 
time figuring out his sailing average than he ever did on any problem that the 
academic departments had for him to work. \ smiling, happy midshipman, 
whilst philosophy of life was to live and let live, George had many friends while 
he was sailing Ins way through the Academy. \ good man for a bull session 
ami a friend who always had a cheerful word, George managed to make life 
at the Academy a lor easier for main of his classmates. 




THOMAS LEE WEISNER 



Greensbure, I nduuui 



Coming ro Navy from the Hoosier State, 10m brought the drawl, the wit, 
and the keen sense of humor for which the state is famous. Pom's slow manner 
o( speech tooled many a professor. His year at Wabash College had more than 
prepared hmi for the rigors of \cademy academics. I sually (pint, Tom could 
always he depended upon to make the perfect remark at the correct moment. 
We who knew Tom shall look forward to meeting him again in the later years 
ol our careers. For by then the stories should he even better and the wit sharper 



GEORGE THOMAS WELSH 



Coaldale-, Pennsylvania 



George, or "Gige," called Coaldale his hometown. He graduated from Coal- 
dale High School in 1951 and in September of that year, was off to Wyoming 
Seminary where he was outstanding; m football and academics. George came 
to the Academy from the Naval Reserve, and from the time he arrived here, 
was outstanding in the field of sports, notably football where he was Varsity 
quarterback. His biggest thrill was definitely the Army-Navy game of 1954. 
He had a very pleasant and popular way about him, and was considered 
definitely to have one of the mildest tempers at USNA. 




414 




NAVAL ACADEMY 



IRA BERNARD WELTMAN 




Rochester, New York 



Graduating from high school in Rochester, Buzz then attended both Harvard 
and Northwestern. He enlisted in the Navy and soon found himself in school 
again, namely the Hospital Corps School. Still searching for greater things, he 
went to NAPS and thence to the Academy. His hospital school training came 
in very handy on the Severn, for having a knowledge of medical terminology, 
Buzz talked the Medical Department into two extensive trips to the Hospital, 
and uncountable numbers of Excused Squad chits. A top debater since Plebe 
year, a staff operator for WRNV, as well as a singer in the Glee Club and 
Antiphonal Choir, Buzz had plenty to do in his spare time. 




"J" WALDEN WESTERHAUSEN 



Laramie, Wyoming 



To satisfy his yen to travel, "J" came to the Academy after a year of college 
and fraternity life at the University of Wyoming. He checked his six guns at 
the Main Office and spent his first year at Navy, convincing his classmates 
that they do have automobiles in Wyoming, and that the Indians aren't on the 
warpath anymore. He participated in Battalion wrestling, tennis, and com- 
pany football. Being from the Great West, his pastimes were hunting, fishing, 
skiing, and — not necessarily a western pastime — looking for a cure for reced- 
ing hairlines. 



PERRY LEE WESTMORELAND 



Olympia, Washington 



Perry came directly from high school in Olympia to the Academy. Ignorant 
of the ways of Navy life at first, he quickly learned and came to appreciate 
Navy life. Classmates always came first with Perry; never was he too busy 
to listen to their troubles or lend a helping hand. Born and raised in the 
Pacific Northwest, he championed the West but liked the travel afforded him 
by the Navy. Being from Washington, where he had excellent opportunities 
for outdoor sports, he ranked hunting and fishing first among the things he 
missed most while at the Academy. His greatest interest always was sports, 
and he spent most of his free time participating in them. 








415 







EDWIN KIRBY WHARTON 



Fair hope-, Alabama 



\ product ol the South, Ned was a tlic-harci rebel who liked those black- 
eyed peas and rfominy grits. A high school Football player before entering the 
Academy, Ned gave his efforts to the Brigade champion swimming and water 
polo teams Plehe year, and was a standout On the company football, Batt 
bowling, and handball teams \< d's slow, easy-going manner was just an out- 
ward trout for an inwardly racing mind Standing near the top of the class, he 
was unique in his ability to plow through national Steam and Skinny days. 
and come out still light ol heart and loaded for hear. 



JAMES EDWARD WHELAN 



Elsmere, Delaware 



\ftcr two \ ears at the I Diversity of Delaw are, a toss of the tlie decided tin 
future for Jim in favor of Navy Tech. As a member of the Fourth Estate, Jim's 
side splitting laugh soon came into the fore in raising firsties from the habitual 
morning stupor, or shaking the OD at chow. Although Jim was never too sure 
ol the color of the light at signal drill, he never made a mistake in the color of 
the jerseys in Batt football and lacrosse, and soon proved himself a terror in 
both sports. Although savvy in the academics. Jim had a hard time trving to 
figure self propulsion through HA) each year. Whether on the sports held. 
dance floor or classroom |im has ahvavs been a success. 




WILLIAM EDWARD WHITAKER 



Fryebur;:. Maine 



Bill was born and raised in a small village hidden by Maine's stately pines. 
The pride of Fryeburg Academy, he entered the Naval Academy via the 
regular Navy. His favorite pastimes were hunting, fishing, and running a 
prosperous trading post with the Indians. In academics he had to work hard, 
yet he was admired greatly by his classmates for determination and ambition. 
Bill could best be characterized as a quiet and very friendly sandblower with 
a true down-east accent. Often complaining about the lack of free time. Bill 
could sometimes be heard muttering his favorite saying, "I'll never smile 
again." 



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FRANK DU RWARD WHITE 



Texarkana, Texas 



From New Mexico Military Institute, Texas A. & M., and most of all, 
Texas, Frank took his first trip East to live on the shores of the Severn. He 
spent most of his time trying to explain why he got an appointment from 
Arkansas, if he was really from Texas. With two Plebe years behind him, he 
was well prepared for the life of a midshipman. Frank concentrated on his 
studies, golf, and enjoying himself, and was successful at all of these activities. 
He was always a nice guy to have around, whether there was work to be done, 
or fun to be had. 



GEORGE THOMAS WHITE 



Ozone Park, New York 



George came to Navy after two years at CCNY, and a year and a half as a 
white hat. He was always ready with a snappy comment, and ran his room- 
mates more than he did the Plebes. Academics were never a strain, and as he 
was a firm believer in having fun — a laugh a day was provided by his struggles 
with the system. Design Chairman of the Class Crest and Ring Committee, 
George also engaged in far flung dragging activities. His athletic interests at 
the Academy centered around lacrosse and the ISO lb. company football team. 
Displayed on his B-robe were several brilliant numerals dating back to plebe 
year. 






JAMES ARTHUR WHITE, JR 



Norfolk, Virginia 



Having had Norfolk for his home port for many years, Jim had no trouble 
steaming up the Chesapeake to Annapolis. He brought along an undying love 
for dancing, movies, and basketball; but found to his dismay that only two of 
these activities were available to Plebes. By conscientious study, and hard 
work however, he saw the hardships of Plebe year give way to the privileges 
accorded the upper classes. Jim kept a lockerful of candy, cookies, and as- 
sorted goodies on hand and could always count on having many friends stop 
by. He was sometimes called the number one book marker in the Brigade, and 
one look at the countless underlinings, doodles and notes written in his books 
would convince anyone it was true. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



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UNITED STATES 



LAURENCE ADAMS WHITE. JR 



San Die-go, California 



Never becoming accustomed to an early reveille, Larry seldom opened his 
eyes more than a narrow slit until after breakfast. However, despite appear- 
ances, the unwary found him always alert to stab out with his sharp humor. 
An agile athlete, he passed his afternoons developing coordination on the 
gymnastics team. Consistently maintaining a passing mark in his studies, he 
divided his time between card games and pocket novels. Always sporting a 
stylish haircut, approximating a wire brush, he was ever ready to admit that 
he liked his music progressive, his drinks to be made of vodka, and his women 
to be beautiful. 




RICHARD FARRELL WHITE San Francisco, California 

Dick traveled all the way from the Golden State of California to give to 
Navj some of his various talents. He did not come alone, however, for he 
brought with him tun main objectives. One was to graduate and the other . . . 
well, Dick was. without a doubt, the Naval Academy's truest Mid when it 
came to the One and Only, lie could he found on any afternoon either on the 
athletic held where he participated in many sports, or in his room conducting 
music by radio. He was a well-mannered sportsman and sincere in his every 
undertaking. 



RONALD LITTEER WIDNER San Mateo, California 

Vftei attending many a school, and traveling from one end of the country to 
tlu- other, Ron came to L SNA on a Presidential appointment. Here, he be- 
came an active member of the Drum and Bugli ( lorps, Concert Band and the 
short-lived Marching Band. He also found time to be a member of his Bat- 
talion's championship bowling team, and to participate in steeplechase, soft- 
ball, cross country, and tennis Following music, aviation is Ron's second love. 
Before coming to the Academy, he soloed in light aircraft, and found himself, 
very much at home in the fraternity of fly boys. 




418 






^ ^ p. 








w 


^ 





NAVAL ACADEMY 



JACK MARTYN WILBERN 




Glendale, California 



Willy left his beloved California after sailing through a year at Glendale 
College and Rutherford Prep. During his tour at Navy Tech. the Masqueraders 
fell heir to his dramatic ability, and Willy delighted many with his wit and 
exuberant personality. Aside from crew and Battalion football, Jackson ex- 
celled at beach-bumming and progressive music. An avid blonde lover, he 
scored more than once on "Ye Old Brick." To forget his love for the obstacle 
course and Skinny would be unforgivable, but Bull and Rice Krispies were 
reserved for his real affection 




JOHN HUDSON WILDE. JR. 



Minneapolis, Minnesota 



A Navy Junior gifted with a very reliable memory, John never had serious 
academic troubles. He easily passed the entrance examinations, but had to 
wait three years for an appointment to come through. In the meantime he 
spent a year at the University of Minnesota, and a half year at the University 
of Virginia before enlisting in the Navy. Affectionately called Johnny by his 
feminine acquaintances, John was seen frequently at the various hops, con- 
certs, and other social functions. His broad background prior to entering the 
Academy stood him in very good stead as a Midshipman, even though he took 
a good deal of ribbing about his advanced age. 



GEORGE HENRY WILKINS 



Goldsboro, North Carolina 



Three years in the fleet gave George, a hard seasoned sailor, a lasting love 
for the Navy and the sea. As a result, he participated extensively in sailing at 
the Academy. An N winner on the Small-Bore Rifle team, he displayed a 
sharp eye and a steady hand. Once a member of a crack Navy drill team, 
George managed to keep in practice by working out with the First Battalion 
drill squad. Even though George spent more time "squaring away" plebes 
than he did studying his lessons, he always managed to chalk up good grades 
in his subject. George is endowed with a strong personality, typical of all 
good leaders. 






419 








FORREST ROGER WILLIAMS 



Paintsville, Kentucky 



Forrest came directly to the Naval Academy from high school and never 
ceased praising'his "blue grass" home land. Being attracted by the mysteries 
i >t science and mechanics, he had little difficulty in adjusting himself to Navy 
academics. His favorite subjects were Physics and Navigation, and his hard 
work and determination made Ins Academy standing a commendable one. 
"F.R.," as many of his classmates called him, found his extra-curricular work 
in yawl sailing and the Academy Choir, but his hobby was playing piano 
classics. Quiet and goodnatured, he was skilled in the art of the gentle phrase, 
and was a pood man ro have on your side in a bull session. 



OSCAR EUGENE WILLIAMS. JR 



Lowndesboro, Alabama 



Gene was born in Montgomery, Alabama, but several days later he was 
taken home to "Rosewood" in Lowndesboro. Being a country boy, he spent 
most of his time riding horseback, hunting, or fishing. He went to high school 
at Hayncville High School, a few miles away, and came to Navy shortly after 
graduation. Gene has a great liking for music, good jokes, hunting, and good 
books. Just about any afternoon after 1600 you could find him in the gym, 
climbing the rope, or up m the weight loft with the weights. He still maintains 
that it takes more than four years to make a person a "city slicker." 




ROBERT LOUIS WILLIAMS 



Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 



Bob was the quiet, unassuming tvpe who could always fit into any group. 
His pre-Academy days were spent working in air-conditioning engineering, 
going to night school, and training in the Naval Reserve. Bob's favorite 
pastime was sleeping, but more often he could be found writing letters, and 
drinking from his ever-present cup of coffee. Although perennially among the 
top in his class academically, he was never what could be termed as studious. 
His chief claim to glory was as a glue-fingered end in 150 lb. touch football. 



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420 





WAYNE M I DDLETON WILLS 



Jackson, Mississippi 



Following a year at Millsaps College, and a tour of duty as an Army sergeant, 
Wayne arrived in Annapolis from NAPS. Afternoons usually found Wayne in 
McDonough Hall, adding to his bag of tricks on the parallel bars. In the 
spring, his talents were shifted to the Softball diamond, where his driving play 
and good sportsmanship contributed largely to the fine teams fielded by his 
company. Wayne liked to spend his quiet moments with a good book and a 
pipe, while collecting fine clothes was his hobby. His quiet, friendly manner 
and ability to get things done should send him far in his chosen career. 



CHARLES N ESBITT Wl LSON 



Trinity, Texas 



Having stolen the Baylor Bear while at Texas U., Charlie thought he could 
get away with anything, and set out to prove it. Using Swede as a sparring 
partner, he soon became rather punchy; but never lost his way with the 
women. Chuck (the girls think it's cute) won his "N" from the femme con- 
tingent, with three or four continually on the proverbial string. Coming from 
Texas made Charlie prone to brag occasionally. He never bothered with aca- 
demics until exam week, or re-exam week as the case may have been. Most of 
his time was spent as the crying towel of the Fifth Company. Never one to 
set the world on fire, he can always be counted on to have his iron in there 
just the same. 





ERIC JERMAN WILSON 



Greenwich, Connecticut 



The Psi Upsilon Chapter at Wesleyan University grudgingly gave up one of 
its brothers, and Rick made his way to the Academy. Not necessarily an artist 
with the books, he did manage to display his talents in other fields : Class Crest 
and Ring Committee, football posters, company sports and Sub Squad. A 
lover of travel, he especially enjoyed cruises and second class summer, as well 
as football trips and jaunts to Richmond. A well aimed dig at the New York 
Giants or the Ivy League would change this normally easy going and congenial 
Dr. Jekyll into a Mr. Hyde. 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



421 














UNITED STATES 



JOHN STUCKEY WILSON 



Centralis, Illinois 



1- ri sh from a year at Centralis Junior College. Jack came east to find a home 
ar Navy lech. His many talents were soon put to advantage as he earned 
niches on the Drum and Bugle Corps, and on the sports staff of the Log. 
Sparking many of the intramural teams. Jack could he found tapping in that 
overtime basket, steaming a serve over the volleyball nets, or cooly striking 
out when the pressure was on at the howling alleys. Statistics are unable to 
depict his even temper ami warm nature which permeated everything he did. 



POWELL JONES WILSON. JR 



Pueblo, Colorado 




Centenial High School, Pueblojunioi College, the University of Colorado, 
and \ \PS . . . Just ask "P.J.," he knows how ... all except dragging trout 
from some Colorado mountain stream. Every fall brought the tale of the one 
that got away. Fortunately, Navy had better luck when casting for '56 and 
landed one that would tit any tale. P.J. proved his athletic versatility by run- 
ning the gauntlet of company and battalion sports. He maintained he had seen 
hauler academic schedules, bur would grant a concession to the trying ways of 
Navy if caught some Saturday night on squadron duty. His stability and 
ability, make a tirm foundation for himself against all trials. 



STEPHEN AMES WISE 



Phi/lipston, Massachusetts 



Steve came to us from Athol High School where he was president of the Pro 
Mi lit" I lonor Society. Some of his spare time he spent hunting and fishing. 
\\ hen the chips were down, as they often were second class year, Steve could 
always be depended upon to relieve the tension with some humorous anecdote. 
He likes all types of music and is an excellent dancer. While at the academv 
he was the mainstay of the company and Battalion squash teams. His sense 
of humor, personality, and his ability to make and hold friends predict success, 
whatever his chosen field. 




■±22 





NAVAL ACADEMY 



MARC THEODORE WOLFF 




Camden, New Jersey 



"Tiger" was not only noted for his packages from home, but also for his 
undying love for football. A good tackle, Marc was a definite asset to the 
J.V.'s and the Second Batt team. When not dying for the "Sizzling Second," 
he could be found pursuing his other favorite pastimes which included good 
music and good literature, not to forget liberty and the sack. A connoisseur of 
fine food, his knowledge of good restaurants proved to be invaluable to new 
draggers. Although not a steady dragger himself, he did find time to give a 
few girls a break. A cheerful guy with a determined attitude, Marc should go 
far in the future. 




JAMES RAY WOLVERTON 



Tulsa, Oklahoma 



Jim came to the Academy via NAPS and the Navy. His mighty right arm 
carried the Battalion fencing team through three undefeated seasons, before 
winning his varsity "N" disqualified him from further intramural competition. 
He held offices in the Physics Club, The Naval Academy Christian Associa- 
tion, and the Midshipmen's Public Relations Committee. Jim was the moving 
force behind the Academy's new Van de Graf generator, and won the Physics 
Club's Annual Technical Paper Contest with his essay on relativity. Company 
Log representative and starring in most subjects, Jim was an all-around guy 
whose ready smile will be sorely missed. 



JAMES ALFRED FRANKLIN WOOD 



Fort Worth, Texas 



Fort Worth, Texas, is a long way from Annapolis, and Jim will probably 
tell you that all the land in between is Texas. In the true Texan tradition, Jim 
often took delight in telling those king-size yarns. During his four years stay 
at the Academy, he was an avid reader of "Peanuts," and devoted his time to 
dreaming of beautiful women and his drag for the coming weekend. Being a 
charter member of the "Poohes" and the SIR squad did nothing to detract 
from his smile or friendliness. He always seemed to be able to come through 
with whatever was needed, when things got tight. 






423 






JOHN EUGENE WOOD Phillips, Texas 

Woods came out of the shadows of the oil derricks to make his fortune ;ii 
Navy. Horn in Oklahoma, he moved and studied in several states hefore wind- 
ing up his pre-Navy studies at Texas lech. When lie wasn't pounding the 
pillow. Woody could usually be found in the wrestling loft working on a pin, 
or on rhe courts playing a fast game of renins. \n ardent fresh air fan, John 
delighted in tilling his room with the frigid hlasis oil the Severn and forcing 
his wives into hibernation. Well liked for his sincerity and well chosen wirrv 
remarks. Woody should go on influencing people and winning friends. 



ORPHEUS LANPHEAR WOODBURY. Ill Springfield, Virginia 

Woody's talents were as numerous as his name is long. Hesides being an 
attentive student, he had a natural athletic ability which made him a PT cut 
every year. Even though he didn't break any world's swimming records, the 
\ arsitv Swimming ream always had a hard worker. Since Woody is a Navy 
Junior, he has traveled extensively, hut still calls Springfield his home. He 
also served a tour of duty in the Naval Reserve. Listening to good music was 
his favorite pastime, and he was often found enjoying a peaceful Saturday 
evening playing his hillbilly records. Woody's sense of duty, and his quiet 
personality make him a welcome shipmate. 




GENE LOWRY WOODRUFF 



Conway, Arkansas 



Woody was known throughout the Brigade for his generous good nature, 
congeniality and an infinite number of friends. A man of many and varied 
interests, Woody took to dragging, liberty, sports and music during his leisure 
moments. Frequently he had to be yanked to the deck in the morning, since 
he was no more bothered by the reveille bell than he was by academics. Woody 
contributed a great deal in the form of extra-curricular activities as a member 
of the Ring Dance Committee and Reception Committee. A good all around 
athlete, he played Plebe Lacrosse, adding to his team's success with his ability 
and drive. 



% 



UNITED STATES 




424 





HERBERT PIERSON WOODS 



Albuquerque, New Mexico 



"Hey Woody, break out your guitar and play some songs for us." These 
words must have been very familiar to happy, congenial Herb after four years 
at the Academy. A gung-ho ROTC made good, Herb started his career at the 
University of New Mexico. A true love for salt water and sailing prompted 
this desert rat to make up for lost time by spending a good portion of his spare 
time racing or drag sailing. Singing with the Neptunes, he entertained on many 
an occasion, and the BAC found him a willing and hard worker. Always one 
who believed in having a basic knowledge and understanding of the theory 
behind all problems. his thoroughness brought him a "well done"on many a job. 



CORBIN WOODWARD. JR. 



Chattanooga, Tennessee 



Corbin, better known to his friends as Woody, hails from the eastern hills 
of Tennessee. Before entering the Academy, he spent a summer at "Ole' Miss" 
University, and a full academic year at Washington and Lee where he was a 
a member of Phi Gamma Delta. Woody was outstanding in French and hopes 
to have a tour of duty in France during his career. He was inclined towards ath- 
letics and participated in company and battalion sports. His two favorites 
were soccer and tennis. Woody has long looked forward to graduation and that 
awaited chance to see the world. 





CARL BRAMLETT WOOTTEN. JR 



Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 



Arriving at USNA from his native Georgia via Florida and Oklahoma, Reb 
was parted from his drawl somewhere along the way. However, a hearty laugh 
and warm reception soon revealed this Southern gentleman. Yes, here is a man 
who found life worth living, and did so vigorously. Whether playing the like, 
race sailing, lifting a full tenor note to the choir loft, or engaged in his favorite 
hobby (spear-fishing), Reb always had a full head of steam up. Spotting the 
competition in the high-bar a couple years experience Reb came through with 
flying colors to pull his weight on the gym team. 




*K< 



NAVAL ACADEMY 



425 






1 




UNITED STATES 



FREDERICK EDWARD WRIGHT 



Denton, Maryland 



Ed was a small town hoy who came to I SNA tilled with ambition. The 
change from his father's farm, to Bancroft Hall was a drastic one, but in time 
he became accustomed to the new life. While at Navy, his greatest interest 
was soccer, in which he proved to he a great scrapper. When not engaged in 
soccer, Ed divided his time between slashing and sleeping. \wa\ from the 
Academy, Ed enjoyed his chance to work on the farm or to take a trip through 
the country. I lis favorite hobby was showing slides to all who would watch. 
Ed's qualities and ambitions combine to make him well liked and admired. 





JOSEPH MARTIN PICKETT WRIGHT. JR. 

.1 una polis, Maryland 

Living on the shores of the Severn was nothing new to Pickett, for he bails 
from an old Navy family and has seen quite a bit of the States. During his 
two years at St. \ndrcws School in Middlefow n. Delaware, be found ample 
time for football, wrestling and the Naval Reserve, lie lent his lacrosse skill, 
which he picked up in Annapolis, to Navy's Varsity and was deadly with that 
stick. On the weekends, Pick could usually be found sailing on the "Vamarie" 
or on one of the other yawls, or loafing at his home in Annapolis. 



ORVILLE WRIGHT. JR. Doylestown, Pennsylvania 

Upholding the reputation ol bis prep school, Wyoming Seminary, Orv 

Wright brought a good deal of athletic ability to the Naval Academy. He got 
his start on the Plebe Basketball and Baseball I earns, and throughout his 
stay here, starred on his company soccer, football, and basketball teams. A 
native of Doylestown, Pennsylvania, Orv served in a local Naval Reserve unit 
before successfully passing the Fleet exam and embarking upon his Plebe year. 
Despite the trials of Plebe year. Orv managed to retain an inherent ready wit. 
His ability to inject humor into any situation earned him many friends and 
resulted in his becoming Humor Editor of the Splinter. 



426 





NAVAL ACADEMY 



EUGENE ANTHONY WROBEL 




St. Paul, Minnesota 



Great Lakes. Airmen's School at Jacksonville, Florida, and NAPS were all 
on Gene's itinerary before he came to the Naval Academy. The big suitcase he 
carried contained his most prized possession, an accordion, and many a com- 
pany party gained momentum from his favorite Polish Polkas. After classes, 
he divided his time between playing company volleyball and steeplechase He 
kept his roommates perpetually blinded from the smoke of his "expensive" 
cigars, of which he had a constant supply. Gene's quiet, easy-going disposition 
made him an easv fit in anv activity which came his way. 




JOSEPH BERNARD WU ERTZ 



Washington, Indi 



™^Joe joined our class within a month after his graduation from Washington 
Catholic High. While reshaping his method of living to fit a military career, 
he retained much of his philosophy that wine, women and song are essential 
to good clean living. A manager for the Varsity Lacrosse Team, he also fired 
on the rifle team and ran cross country. An ardent auto racing fan, he could 
awe anyone save his fellow Hoosiers, with his knowledge of the classic "500". 
Joe's big interest is in the wild blue yonder, for he is a great jet enthusiast, and 
looks forward to casting his lot with the professional fly-boys. 



EDWARD ANDREW ZABRYCKI 



Manville, New Jersey 



Ed made town history when he came to the Naval Academy, since he was 
"the mid" from Manville. Before coming to the Academy, he attended 
Wyoming Seminary where he won the Babe Ruth Memorial Award for leader- 
ship and athletic ability. Although an injury kept him out of football, Ed soon 
became a regular on the Varsitv Wrestling Team. On many weekends you 
could be sure to find Ed on the flying squadron. All of this dragging kept him 
in an easy going mood, broken only to defend the North in another battle of 
the Civil War. Sunshine Alley lived through four Dark Ages because of Ed's 
"Polack cookies." His drive and will to finish a job was characterized by his 
performance on the Navy mat. 






I 



I 



427 






FRANK FRASER ZECHLIN 



\ i York, New York 



Frank came -to the Naval Academy after a rather extensive military back- 
ground. IK- graduated from Shattuck Military Academy and entered the 
University of Minnesota. From there he was called into the service, and chose 
rlu Na\ \ tip M'c the world, lie was very handy with the foil and fenced with the 
Varsity learn for three years. Never before had the American Society of 
.Mechanical Engineers been run so smoothly as ir was when he had the secre- 
i. ii j ship. Candidates flocked in from everywhere and what is more important, 
tiny brought with them the fifty cent membership fee. Incidentally, "The 
Zech" now has a solid gold Cadillac. 



ROBERT EMMETT ZEHNDER 



Naugatuck, Connecticut 



I laving a year of Notre Dame under his belt before coming to the Academy 
put Reggie in good stead for the academics, and he found the secret to success 
in complete relaxation. When the hell for class would ring, he'd get out of bed, 
shake the lint from his blues and ask, "What class are we going tor" Plebe 
year accomplishments included knocking out his roommate in boxing class. 
and playing on the only water polo team never to win a match. Hut as rlu 
years went on. he grew more mature in his outlook and devoted considerable 
time to girls. The reputation of the Academy can rest secure on the shoulders 
of Rob Zehnder. 



ROBERT WAYNE ZIMMERMAN Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Boh hails from Minnesota and was an avid follower of the Big Ten's sports. 
He spent a year at the Northwestern Preparatory School and a year at the 
Lniversity of Minnesota, before he entered the Academy. He was not only an 
avid Navy fan, but also an active participant in our athletics. A star quarter- 
back for the 150 lb. football intramural team of his company, Bob scored 
many points for the team. Likewise, the company \olleyball and basketball 
teams were well shored up by his sterling play. A noted football expert, Bob 
could usually pick the outcomes of the major football games with amazing 
accuracv. 




NAVAL ACADEMY 



428 



The underclasses of the United States Naval Academy 
made up the Brigade of Midshipmen which gave us our first 
chance to practice the principles of leadership and 
administration we had been learning for three years. Divided 
into twenty-four Companies the Brigade was our 
responsibility and the problems of its smooth and efficient 
accomplishment of its responsibilities afforded us the 
experience which helped to round out our training as future 
officers. These men we lived and worked very closely with 
for as many as three years and developed many firm 
and lasting friendships among them which will carry on 
during our service careers. To the Underclasses we give up 
the leadership of the Brigade of Midshipmen secure in 
the faith that they will carry on in high standards of faith, 
courage, service, truth, and honor on which the 
United States Navy is founded. 





Hoerner, Covey, Piske, Collier, Hull, Lloyd, Scheyder, Harri 



M.-nill F. Collier 




BRIGADE STAFF 




Wayne M. Wi 




Vndrade, Granger, Eyler, Wills, rvoerkenmeier. Hannah. Brillantes, Simpson. 



WINTER 



132 






':. 


te-->r« 


[ < 


**Sii. ^Vl 












K?^*?£J^'T 




— - . ., __i 















NOON MEAl FORMATION 





FALL SET 



Robertson, Nicholson. Scanlon, Chavarria, Edgar, 
Van Metre, 1 albert, 




FIRST REGIMENT STRIPERS 




Colman, Lindiitiist. Weeks. Burt. Gulick, 
Scnnlon, \\ oods. 



WINTER SET 




434 



^g£fifMP 




Wilkins, Jernee, Blanchard, Stinson, Newcome, Edgerton. 




FIRST BATTALION 



WINTER SET 




FALL SET 



I 




Broyles, Dickerson, Furlong, Shewcliuck, Lewin, Schoep. 



Cdr. M. E. Stewart, USN 



435 







FALL SET 



McDonell, Walsh, Mien, Kuvkcndall, Lvnch, Bachman. 




SECOND BATTAL1 




Monson. Smiley, Audilet. [ones. (Camp, Dyer. 





Cdr. N. C. Nash, USX. 



WINTER SET 



456 






FALL SET 




Lewis, Jennings, Weeks, Webster, White, Hackling. 



THIRD BATTALION 




Cdr. J. G. Drew, USN. 



WINTER SET 




437 



I 




I * * 1 * f •• § # 

fft '£% ■"§ * t« t ! t It -f -t 






Liiii; = SiiS 



*: i 




A'.. 



Hi 



Vyars, Sharp, Gentry, ["avlor, J; Palmer, Slayman, Peterson, J; Conley, Sla> 

Prather, Lord, Taylor, 1'; \ Ost. Davis. Schulz, Kimmel, Woodley, Morgan, Street! I I mean, McNulla, Shi 

Schwitzer, Maddox, Kirkley, Wright, Rosser, Kenefick, / irlh k - Peterson, C; Blecher, Cantrell, Eytchison, Wilson, 
Westphal, Moore. Mayer. Wiedeman, Ghrisman. 



YOUNCiSTEK 



First Row: Morgan, Cunningham, Burgess, Hendrick, McMurry, Davis. Pope, Brown, Carter. Kihunc. Si R v: Papa, 1)1 r I) r 

Garrity, Murray, Martin. Kan. Roberts, Zembrzuski, McGowen, Wiley. Third K Kcyes, Hill. Kelch, Lloyd, Brainerd, ILLDL 



Laton, I [anford, Cudlipp. 
Nield, Babcock, Currie. 



Walker. Bognanni, Dunn. Rohertson. Tuggle, Rogers, Williams. Fifth Row: Baskin, 








^A^Jk 




L^ft^fcA»k»jAtJfe 



Higgins 
Hyatt 
Jones, DE 
Jones, DH 



Lamay 
Liebesman 
Loman 
Lneker 



Murphy 
Nolan 
O'Connell 
Pritchard 



Prushansky 
Richardson 
Roche 



Smith 
Spillane 





FAT'! 



Terrell, Hunt, Thomas, Alexander, Hejhall 



WINTER 




Groner, Maio, Welsh, Warren, O'Shea. 




Lt. R. F. Gower, USN 




439 




■■■ 



2ND 
COMPANY 



Lt. I. G. McKie. USN 





FALL 



WINTER 




RufFner 

Smith 

Thomas 

Walker 



Warcher 
\\ eston 
\\ oods 



440 







First Row: Fordham, Ballard, Panzarino, Vreeland, Lima, Gardner, Miller, Lyons, Short, Meany, Hicks. Second Row: Pheris, 
Marshall, Carter, Ruwwe, Nicholas, Chiocchio, Cobb, Cockley, Cummins, Macauley. Third Row: Figura, Lovitt, Reed, 

YrtlllVff ^TFR Byman, Gorton, Polski, Immerman, Graver, Hospes. Fourth Row: Bass, Osborn, Pidgen, Williams, Thoureen, Sutton, Car- 

lULllUljl IjII retta, Swanson. Fifth Row: Hekman, Barrett, Phillips, Ring. 



PI FRF Fi"t Row: Kennedy, Butterfield, Kittredge, McDonald, Shiverdecker, Umsted, Straughan, Corbelli, Marangoni, Aho, 
3 LIjIJL Buchanan. Second Row: Branch, Zscheile, Ceres, Boyd, Marron, Dugan, Rohr. Hydinger, Larkin, H'uzey.^Third Row: Ihly, 

Nargi, Ballantine, Knief, McCabe, Richardson, Town, Moncilovich. Fourth Row: Field, Bohr, Geiger, Pollock, Cooke, Brown, 

Adamson, Longfellow. Fifth Row: Sullivan, Lukish, Stephens, Tracy, Pizinger, Beaton. 









mi\ 




V*W*l*t«^V\* 



• I • « 



S pi 



t n . • i i I i . i t 

* a a * * fcl* 63 



- 



YOUNGSTEH 




/"irrt /tow: McGugin, Hughes, Criner, Reid, Keith. Welles. Moore, \tata. Lorusso, [oni Freeman, Held, 

Guinn, Rosadino, Male. Neely, Stewart, Ingram, Harrington Luders, Grimm, Sudmeyer, Ranes, Hernandez, 

Goodwin, Statton, Darius. Fourth Rote: Swart, Juliano, Corder, Slafkosky, Pendley, Paul, Fitzgerald. Fifth A' Britton, 
Perkins, Hotard, Trudcau, Kane. 



First Row: Harris, Scotr, Asafaylo, McCord, Daidone, Keefe. Finley, Burnett, McDevitt, Tritz. Second Row: Noreika, 
Odoni, Rhurke. Rossi. Studds, Clark, O'Connell, Clautice, Squires. Third Row: (Jlisitnik. (iarrett. Lockwood, Watt, Smith. 
Aslnon, Bunch. Rusiewski. Fourth Roto: Touhey, Brown. Dyke, Legro, I alhoon, Larson. Rm Booth. Pechaucr, 

Schon, Forsher», Wheatley, Jones. Sixth Rote: Hudalla, Hunter, Messner. 



PLEBE 





Behrends 
Boyle 
Burke 
Burchett 



Chaney 
Copeland 
Cudahy 
DeCarlo 



Duffy 

Durbin 

Fields 

Foresman 



Foss 
Hoppe 
Howe 
Kirkland 



Knauf 

Koster 

Lenhart 

Massimino 



Mickle 
Morris 
Peerenboom 
Peresluha 



Prosser 
Quinn 
Saan 
Shewmaker 



Simsarian 
Smith 
Stoodley 
Tapper 



Vaughan 
Vieweg 

Warters 



FALL l 




Osgood, Jaeger, Tucker, Lind, Ernst. 



WINTER 




Farren, Lakey, Shumaker, Freeman, Forbrick. 




Capt. R. J. Perrich, USMC 




3RD 
COMPANY 




443 




Lt. R. K. Ripley, USN 




Garrison, Flannery, Honsinger, Gossens, Zcchlin 




FALL 



WINTER 



Arnold 

Baulch 

Beany 

Chanslor 




Sedor 

Simonton 

Slaughter 

Stoeczer 



Timothy 
Truxall 
\\ arren 
Wvatt 



444 




YOUNGSTER 



First Row: Longton, Creighton, Taylor, Adams, Granum, Smith,'jRadigan, Green, Pinto, Pratt. Second Rozo: Michels, Tate, 
Gaheen, Charrier, McPadden. Russ, Diesing, Grzybicki, Blastos. Third Row: Davidson, Ridley, Zariquiey, Pinkham, Fuller, 
Dargis, Flora, McClure. Fourth Row: Criswell, Bernes, Mixson, Drury, Ellis, Holthaus, Lerum. Fifth Row: Mason, Topping, 
Howard, Mulholland, Meyer, Marbain, Keefe. 



PLEBE 



First Row: Nielsen, Thresher, Chambers, Bothwell, Wirth, Roensch, Hager, Roddey, Funderburk, O'Neill. Second 
Row: Dorwart, Morgan, Humes, Lazarchick, Minard, McCarthy, Kincannon, Nelson, Vasey. Third Row: Regan, Ball, 
Gardner, Her, Petitt, Rich, Karpick, Bruce. Fourth Row: Kelly, Oliver, Manton, Roescher, Van Nort, Snyder, Franck, 
Martz, Allen. 





First Row: Brophy, Reeves, Carl. Mont ova. McMahon, Gold, Malais, Mayers, rodd, Lcalce. St R Musgrove, R<-\ nolds, 

Vick, lackson, Hcrold, Lewis, Manley, Smiley, Wilson Browne, Kuhneman, Binford, Stubbs, Ryan, Giam- 

battista. Chappie, \kcrs. F urtl A •■ . Sildorff, Sorcnson. Garland, Gifford, Wolff, Veasey, R'audio . Martin, VftllMf SITFP 

Malcewicz, Coe, Ryan. I V L PI lid 1 E/Il 



First Row: Muncey, Freckmann, Shinn. Cheston, Waterman, Evans, Yickery, Haffey. Monarch, Snyder. Second A Mor- n I r I) r 
gan, N'nnn, Templeton, Chulick, Richardson, Clarke. Johnson. Peek, \n ■: Hopps. Peters, Snively, Hanson. ILEDL 

McMinn. Orns, Moore, Lovejoy, F urtl A Deringer, Hartford. Keesey, Kini:, Poor, Doane, Reifsnyder. Fifth A 
Franco, Polk, Erikscn, Hopcus. Flynn, lackson. Srrackwitz, Henning. 









r R:*mv. 



t t 

, , ' t t * J J . t 





Barczak 
Blackner 



Cinla 



Cockell 
Crebbin 
Croucher 
Currie 



Dahnke 
Dammar 



dney 



Fimkbauser 
Gallagher 
Hanvey 
Haviland 



Heyward 
Hobbs 
Jenson 
Kersliner 



Kiel 
Kramer 
Longton 
Luke 



McElwee 
Nevin 
O'Grady 
Popik 



Pruess 
Robb 
Romoser 
Rook 



Silvia 
Sloane 
Stallma 
Tilson 



Wiltsie 
Underbill 



FAIL 




Whelan, Ellis, Arnold, Anthony, Eaton. 



WINTER 



■■■■■■&»jii«» 


• 




•.v 

• 


» 


|f 


- 1::, 

1 m , <M 


\ ' ^- l * 




g i } 








'■'''""■-■'»'" — 






■'"" — " : -- ■■-■!•!•■!* 




' 1 



Flatley, Schmidt, Baals, Clay, Niles. 




Lt. D. A. Smith, USN 




447 




Lt. P. E. Smith, USN 




Francis, Miller. Flood, McPartland, McBridc. 




- FALL 



Armstrong. Smith, Rosenhauer, Evans, Horvatli. 




WINTER 



Beeler 

Boyne 

Campbell 

Cobi 



Dcmpsey 
Dennis 
Dunlap 
Fowlkes 



Gareiss 
Grigsby 

I hut 

Hartman 



Hcske 
Hollabaugh 

Jamison 
I .1 n in in 



Linder 
Madison 
Mamanc 

Marryott 



McCabe 
McCrackcn 
McIS 
Mcchling 



Neumann 
Noll 

North 
Papaccio 



Paulk 

Piper 

Ramberger 

Reid 



Smiley 

Weaver 

\\ oolman 

Zimmer 




448 



f 



!">?» ■> 



I 

t 




it;!!'/!. 






• y ' ' y 



§ « * 8 




YOUNGSTER 



AVj-Z Row: Robinson, White, Given, Cunanan, McLane, Lyons, Svvope, Morris, Walters, Rueckert. Second Row: Pfingstag, 
Rowe, Granzin, Grucza, Oldham, Flood, Konkel, Kraft, Norkin. Third Row: Humphrey, Price, Caldwell, Gill, Miller, Hoel, 
Phillips, Pabst. Fourth Row: Fleming, Blank, Kenney, Halliday, Grocki, Alexander, Ericksen. Fifth Row: Pierson, Helweg, 
Leo, Cotterman, Dallam, Paull, McLellan, Priebe. 



PLEBE 



First Row: Emerson, Estes, Patten, Milligan, Osborn, Peterson, Hudson, Nordvvall, Facciani, Greenert. Second Row: Saenz, 
Carbaugh, Stitzel, Stevens, Hoiby, Tiedemann, Junghans, Cobb, Oistad. Third Row: Hearst, Marshall, Fitzpatrick, 
Chamberlain, Willen, Kiland, Hawthorne, McGlinchey. Fourth Row: Vogt, Curtin, Frie, Flynn, MacDonald, Webster, 
Engel. Fifth Row: Rodriguez, Fiene, Shoemaker, Hardin, Michael, Johnson. Sixth Row: Billings, Truax, Bonitay. 





f» -T#^™# J? ; # ft # " ; <S*L #*,.# *^ 
t ■ * f § * f ; f • t 9 f 



*• *| H 



449 






■— ■ 



i 


„ 


1 


yy 












First Row: Friedland, Pcttic, Woodbury, Lombard, Shriver, Butterworth, Kennard, Dickey, Korzinek, Lustfield 

Row: Byng, Bartels, \llard, Putnam, Medlock, Mink. Greene, Coyne, Bargar. Third Row: Mclntyre, Buck, Hoffman, Que- 

gan, Davis, Fenick, Jacobs. Bellay. / urti A' to: O'Connor, Hurst, Hanson. Gibson, liritnth. Gies, O'Donnell / 

Stack. Hauler, Simmons. Longdon, Washburn. 



YOUNGSTER 



First Row: Palmer, Evans, Santos, Rowland. Cartwright, Cusumano. Dukes, Brown. Wainwright, Branson PI FRF 

Lamphear, Barlow. Beasley, Reynolds. Fleming, Kartvedt, Wright, Staats. Lewis. Third A' ■■ . Sattenburg, Chase, Parker, ILIjDIj 
Seymore, Maynard, Ekleberry, Willingham, Jaseph. Fount: A' w. O'Keefe, Young, Chomicz, Hurd. Higgins, St. Vmaand, 
Stephenson. Fifth A' w: Farrington, Christenson, Bacon, Clark. 





Alexander 
Bangert 
Bell 
Blessing 



Brenner 
Bucher 
Cassimus 
Christenson 



Cole 
Davis 

Duggan 
Forsyth 



Frank 
Googe 
Hall 
Harlow 



Hellewell 
Kauffman 
LaSalle 
Loewentlial 



Marks 
Matthews 
McGinn 
Meneke 



Mooney 
Moore 
Nichols 
Nielsen 



Nuss 

Ostrander 
Palmer 
Putnam 



Sargent 
Snow 
Thomas 
Tims 



Vainsrein 

Van Landingham 

Welsh 

Zemlicka 



FALL 




Peterson, Sasso, Roberts, Cronin, Devoll. 



WINTER 



HHfflyHj 


^^^PiS^B 


*■■.■.. — - '^B~-~ 


m=niJia: ^ .,,,.,- 


•52^"" 


_,. ^^^M j.. .11. >n. imw.i»i liiiwiiwi i ii - 





Costilow, Hanson, Heisinger, Harmon, Klingensmith. 




Lt. B. D. Wiggins, USN 




7TH 
COMPANY 




451 



8TH 
COMPANY 



Capt. E. Y. Holt, Jr.. USMC 




Stockham, Byng, Bird, Charnci i 




FALL 



Baker 
3etchcr 
Brewer 

Bustle 



Butterfield 

Con at y 

DcMars 

Dicker 



Dichlmann 
Dugan 
Eddins 
Fcndler 



Ford 

< ilcason 

Graff 

Jensen 



Kane 

l.ary 

Martin 

Marxer 



Mitchell 
Parker 

Peterson 
Pirncv 



Rcichart 

Roudebush 
Sakey 
Senior 



Smith 

I homas 

Thompson 

\ arnadore 



Whitmire 
Wilber 

Worrell 
Zollars 



WINTER 




452 



w m, ' m. m » « m & *4 



y ' - / 



• . / 



9 « (P* • * 



» ; i 



_ i^ • ^ g^ ^ Mi ti^ i «fe ft 



YOUNGSTER 



/"irrf .Sow.' Ulhorn, Rohrbough, Farlee, Chambliss, Nagel, Brinegar, Van Landingham, Clarkson, Shafer, Krerschmar. 
Second Row: Thomas, Leary, Yasenchok, Ingram, Palmer, Triebes, Bovvne, Freakes, Hutchinson. Third Row: Hoback, 
Reeger, Krauter, Wawak, Salmon, Wright, Kirby, Robbins. Fourth Row: Barry, Fredricks, Daniels, Anderson, Friedman, 
Larson, Brown, Warren. 



PLEBE 



First Row: Lehmberg, Matthews, Collins, Veasey, Masterbone, Fitzgerald, Morrow, Shipp, Rucker, Salyer, Gordon. Second 
Row: Keske, Dipalo, Kempe, Ketts, Boltz, Hendren, Piekanski. Baker, Bowley, Olds. Third Row: Albrecht, Brown, Ash, 
Young, Storen, Huetter, Logan, Doelger, MacFarlane. Fourth Row: Rees, Volgenau, Murphy, Finlen, Stapleton, Dvornik, 
Ives, De Fonzo. Fifth Row: Madden, Phillips, Lyons, Leisenring, Mascali, Williams. 




™f ^t ™ -"• § ■* # "^ § * f * f " 




•» #i 



i^ *^ 



453 



* * i * 

^S* i 4 A ' *^* ^k JL 



It 
T 





.f»tV%*»f*UM»5F 



< . . y 



** *t J % 9 * •• 



5 » - - 



• 



*.Lm.Jk 



First Row: Kane, Bartels, McCartex, Schaum, Peters, Cartwright, Nicholas, Chriv lor. Parks. St R Pyatt, 

Henderson, Roach, Mason, Desselle, Blake, Prout, Arneson, Mortenson. Third Roto: David, kirk, Williams, Scannus, Ken- 
dall, Pejsar, Gibson, Haase. Fourth fit w: McKinnon, Sellers, Miller, Dcntv, Burgard, Nfulty, Martin,-/ Sword, YftlINf ^TIIJ 
Gaither, league, Adkins, Heard. HJUllUtfllill 



First Ro:c: Bundarin, Smith, Sabater, Schultz, Packard. Green, Weber, Fairchild, Abington, Haumont. Second Ron: Kubach, D I E D E 
Permenter, Stanton, Myers, Bond. Donnell, Gazley, Chapla, Naef. Third Row: Menzics, Render. Henderson, Copcland, IliLDL 
McWhorter, Davis. Median. Bramblcy. Fourth Row: Wright. Shimota, l.ivcngood, (irise. Mcl.endon, Curtis, Fuqua. Fifth 
Row: Rawson, Laterty, Gaither, Ekstrom, Raunig, Stephens. Sixth Row: Bryan, Osborne. Christensen. 





Ahrens 
Alkire 
Alvarez 
Andrews 



Barnes 

Bates 

Bennington 



Bishop 
Coyle 
Deegan 
Dixon 



Duke 

Dundervill 
Fong 
Gibson 



Hogan 
Jaynes 
Johnson 
Knapp 



McGaugh 
McMorris 
Oates 
Ogas 



Pagani 
Parkinson 
Partlow 
Powers 



Rayfield 
Sims 
Snider 
Stacey 



Stebbins 
Steinke 
Swenor 
Thoeny 



Thomas 



FALL 




Ford, Green, Gulick, Skene, Fulk. 



WINTER 




Price, Herndon, Edgar, Nagel, Ba 




LCdr. E. H. Loftin, Jr., USN 




455 




LCdr. W. T. Traynor. USN. 




Missler, Shortridge, Nelson, Henry, Booth 



I. \ ^^ 



FALL 




WINTER 

456 



Adams 
Altenburg 
Anderson 

Barton 



Beasley 

Biele 

Bowers 

Broome 



Croeber 
Derr 
Fallai 

Kernald 



Finn 

GifFord 

Hieti 

Hogg 



Isfiuith 
James 

Kail 
Kensinuer 



Kirkpatrick 

Krilowicz 

Leahy 



Mcllvain 
McNerney 

Mickey 
O'Brien 



Patterson 

Peacher 

Putkonen 

Reillv 



Rice 

Saracco 

Spring 

I homas 




Ward 
Wells 






mm 



*?^¥i^¥I 



.CL 



/ ' ' / 



9* 9% P« Pf 



First Row: Hulme, Fredrickson, Holdeman, Mitchell, Radcliffe. May, Murphree, Alexander, Lehman, Runzo. Second Row: 
Lupfer, Flynn, Weibly, Fredda, Giglio, Hillsman, Granville, Giddens, Nance. Third Row: Meador, Manahan, Peyton, Luke- 

YAIIWP STU P naS- McMichaels, Van Hoose, Seeberger, Lanigan. Fourth Row: MacGregor, Venable, Gardner, Garvey, Doss, Tipton, Meurer. 

IVUllUfllljIl Fifth Row: Sutherland, Ault, Pyle, Kopp, Jenkins, Nicolls. 



PT FRF First Row: Young, Bauer, Stout, Lester, Ferris, Firmin, O'Brien, Grosh, Voris, Anderson. Second Row: Harrison, Camilleri, 
I L LDE Bush, Finerty, Martin, Westfahl, Goddard, Ferndorf. Third Row: Dunn, O'Connell, Priest, Dobbs, Pease, Simmons, Dem- 

ming, Schleck. Fourth Row: Abdalla, Barksdale, Hutchinson. Epps, Norwood, Held, LeSueur. Fifth Row: Osborn, Fernandez, 

Findlay, McVey, Read, Smith. Sixth Row: Mitchell, Bruce, Tocado, Knight. 




if. * J. m, I. m J> <£ J». * M-. m M mv 




j <J 9 « * * 



* ! 



457 



^. . Lh yu *J| «fai ±3 



A 



mi 




E t-JFJI 



• « 99 1 



~ ~B _ .81. -. ■ _ Al . tim 




First Ro:c: Kosort, Reinarz, Herrin, Chadick, Fohrman, Donahue, Parker, \ccountius, McGregor, Ma 
Feeney, Hall, Ziegler, Midgarden, Mackenzie, Haugen, Christcnson, Meinig, Walter. Third Row: Henderson, Dillman, 
Rorer, Wright, Morris, Riches, Poremba, Burke. F urth K Pel :rson, Gerson, Hamilton, Roberts, rop, Comly, Sickman 
Fifth Row: Rohcrson, Baker, Trourman, \ k-tor. Anthon\ 



YOUNGSTER 



First Row: Johnson, Davison. Sigmund, Vol;i. Danitschek, Joynt, Wells, Langemo, Neish, Bow Hopkins, 

McCall, Robinson, Posey, Corse, Touchstone, Swaby, Drake, Vmbl Honsa, Quinn, Shirrefts, Smith, LaVan, 

Boothe. Dabulewicz, Wynn. / Cutler, McDaniel, Trossbach, Brown. Long. Hougland, Wellborn, Butler. / 

Rota: Griffith, Lath rop, Scoggins, Pipkin, Meredith, Mauz, Gorham, Lekebusch. Absent: Chance, Ortega, LaCagnina. 



PLEBE 





Koch, JW 

Koch, KW 

Leonard 

Lowrance 



Matney 
McCauley 
McKemie 
Nolan 



Paul 
Peake 
Peterson 
Phillips 



Pistotnik 
Smith 
Steelnack 
hurman 



Turner 
Wellborn 
Wood row 



FAIL 







Bellinger. Olds, Cecil, Schneider, Keegan. 



WINTER 




Hayman. \\ esterhausen. Miller, Sloan, Scovel. 




Capt. A. M. Haig, USA 




11TH 
(0MPAN1 




459 




12TH 
COMPANY 




Capt. R. R. Dickey, USMC 




Good, Neuhard, Hart. Everett, Kennedy. 

mmmmtm 




FALL 



Foote, Baker, Simpson. Shannon, Burgk. 




WINTER 

460 



Anderson 

Bauknecht 

Beatty 

Brown 



Browne 

Clark 

Cook 

Cox 



DeMott 

Dohcrry 
Doyle 

l-.dmondson 



link 

( luttman 

I [anna 

Harrison 



Hatfield 

Heiden 

Hicks 



I. ut/. 

Malynn 

Marshall 

McCormick 



McMenamin 

Miner 

Monteith 

Nace 



Normand 

Price 

Rogers 

Ross 



Russell 

St. Martin 

Schneider 

Sturtevant 



Trammell 





YOUNGSTER 



First Row: Butler, Goldberg, Choderow, Houston, Graham, Haynes, Van Niman, Mitchel, Phenegar, Wilcox. Second Row: 
Cooper, Correll, Westbrook, Rice, Omberg, McNergney, Skiles, Featherston, R.K., Bridgman. Third Row: Chafee, Olson, 
Holroyd, McCullough, Meisel, McKee, Lacy, Jokanovich. Fourth Row: Manazir, Featherston, E.W., Goolsby, Graessle, 
Rachap, Bayne, Miller. Fifth Row: Harrison, Randall. Lyon, Weitfle, Hatchett. 



P I Ij I) L First Row: Casasanto, Erickson, Dagnampat, Valenza, Hammond, Haley, Vandeputte, Poole, Davenport, Ruth. Second 
Row: Sheasley, Sapp, Young, Hudgins, Trippe, Sullivan, Schoneman, Fernow, Glaeser. Third Row: Batts, Leeds, Cain, 
Rickman, Davis, Lackey, Starck, Lloyd. Fourth Row: Palmer, Calhoun, Hamilton, Knox, Yeager, Osgood, Ibarra. Fifth 
Row: McFillips, Ligon, Habermas, Wilderman, Shiels, Logie. Sixth Row: Osgood, Leonard, Jesberg. Hendry, Wright, Riley, 
Braman. Absent: Amoroso. 





FALL SET 



Haddad, I1d-^. Shafer, Hobbs, Benson, 
l'liillins. Wright. 




SECOND REGIMENT STRIPERS 




Hudgens, Slough, Hobbs, Kelso. Evans, 
Nelson. Braun. 



WINTER SET 




462 




FALL SET 



Hanna, Oaks. Rich. James, Sackett. Boebert. 




FOURTH BATTALION 



WINTER SET 








Hopkins. Putnan. Davidson, Mulloy, Johnston, Beagle. 



V^ Cdr. R. Wiggins, USN 



463 




i r t 



i£U FALL SET 



Tarbuck, Alser, Wootten, Kncttles, Taylor. W. R. Smith. 




FIFTH BATTALION 




Collins, Boensch, Baggs, Peterson, Miller, Hale. 





Cdr. F. C. Perrv, USN 



WINTER SET 



464 



FALL SET 




Donovan, Kelly, Beving, Whitaker, Petersen, Sanchez-Carrion. 




SIXTH BATTALION 







Garges, Benson, Mayfield, Schilling, Owings, Ingram. 



LCol. H. J. Woessner, USMC 



WINTER SET 




465 



*4<* 



Mm 



m 




xSBff 



r \J&nnv. 



ft f 



-n£ 



/ . . 



H • • 



■ ■ - mm .mm 



First Row: Rowe, Izard, Degnan, Patterson, Stryker, renncnt, Mansfield, Conery, Hardy, Moran. Second R • Panaia, 
Rontis. Krausc, Martella, Vincent, Guthman, Robinson, Pulling, laniuin. 7 Vferry, Brown, Moll, Booriakin, 

Korncgay, Lane, Brancato, Powell. /■' urti A' Gray, Wicr, Caughman, Bcran, Peters, Mathcson, Witzmam 
I [och, Broady, McGirt. 



YOUNGSTER 



First Row: Whittlesey, Martin. Baldwin, Donovan. D.A.. Botrortf". Lee, Thompson, Chidsey, Hamlin. Pagnillo, I) 
Second A' :■■ Vsher, Cosky, Barnum, McReynolds, Messerschmidr, Pearson. Franklin. Navraril, Battaglini, Greene. Tt ■■ 
R Crompton, Parsons, Naviaux, Blount, Nells. Bloch, Davis, fidd. Fourti A' Wallace, Smith, Rogers, Bickley, Hurley, 
Bosrick. Elliott. /'- ' A' re: Trover. Donovan. F.R.. Bogle, Belote, Bond, Yerkcs, Milli : Phillips. Sklenar, Shinn, 

Hocvcr. Warson. ./•' rent: Loveless. 



PLEBE 










■■■ 





.•StiVxiw^WJC^ 



t Ml fit 

ft f t i t f:t:t: 







466 





Almstedt 
Arcuni 
Arnold 
Began 



Bostick 
Coleman 
Cooper 
Davis 



Donnelley 

Drumm 

Heald 

Hodge 



Johnston 
Kerrigan 
King 
Ksvcewski 



Licari 

Lindquist 

Mandel 

Miklos 



Murphy 
Nelson 
Oldfield 
O'Neill 



tit f^wrftM 



Roth 
Secor 



Srewart 




FALL 




Stevenson, lownsend, Peterson, White, Fischer. 



WINTER 




Weidman, Mitri, Brown, Levendoski. Perry. 




Lt. (jg) T. F. Rush. USX 

13TH 
COMPANY 



467 




14TH 
COMPANY 



Capt. R. D. Whitesell, USMC 




Biles, Eagyc, Lowden, lylcr, Dctorc. 



// /<■ 




FALL 



Wright. Smith, Macan, Cyr, Moore. 




WINTER 



Andrews 

Antonicelli 

Bailey 

Baker 



Balent 
Black 

Brown 
Curry 



Emmett 

FaHmey 

Fazzio 

Kelt 



< iant 
Haworth 

lliurins 

Holt 



Howei 

Jerome 

[Case 

Kronzcr 



I.irrlc 
Lucas 
1'orrer 
Rover 



Rutemiller 

Samuelsen 

Scott 

Sixbe] 



Smith, JJ 

Smith. WS 

Strahm 

Vosseller 



Weiland 

Weiss 

Wright 




468 




First Rozv: Williams, Berry, Theoharv, Gelinas, Sasche, Moore, Bauer, Wandell, Lotr, Hissong. Second Rozv: Landrum, 
Huff, Merrike'n, Wallace, Frailer. Dyck, Creighton, L.W., McGaffin, McKelvey. Third Rozv: Creighton, K.S., Ingle, Shearer, 

VAUNT 5 TAP Brandenburg, Peters, Wilson, Gebhart, Davis. Fourth Rozv: Clements, Griffin, Palmer, Hunter, Jaeger, Barnheiser, Dickson. 

IVLillllJlIjIl Fifth Rozv: Beron, Wade, Thompson, Doty, Bertke. 



I r D F First Rozv: Eshelman, Eason, Corroum, Garrity, Langford, Gross, Lowe, Hampton, Whipps, McFarlane, Guthrie, Korrell. 

1 L L D L Second Rozv: Flynn, Bado, Faust,,Dziezec, Groom, Doyle, Hough, Leder, Clark, Ilg, Tarpgaard. Third Rozv: Gardner, White- 

hurst, Udebrock, Pokela, Brickie, Ealick, Hernon, Buxton, Nourie. Fourth Rozv: Connolly, Larson, Cobb, Paine, Frank- 
hauser, Gifford, Smoot, Drozd. Fifth Rozo: Tuzo, Martin, Milwee, Walsh, Wheaton. 






, ^jL ^^Wl j^^^Bl l^^B i I^^Bt ^^^t i^^^t ^^^« 


i 

i 


f. 7- 

« 1 


1 m ¥ -.▼. i -i •¥": i: ri 



S ../../../../'' ' • / • . y • . ^ ... 

1* •« •« f% »| ** »| 5% 5« * 

1 1 

(ill, | # . | 

iLJiLJLJLiL^MiiidLfi 


-~ -. -v-c^iO"'-"-'--"-- 



Fir I A' .:. Williams, Boman, Calkins. Cook. Parks, [Hick, Boener, Tulley, Whitney, Goto. S MacKcnzie, I ber, 

Graham, Love, Hagood, Werner. Swarner, Stephenson. Barbero. Tl ird A • Heyden, Fry, Kessler, Holland, Piei 

Edison. Luce. Fourth A' ■ Sheehan, Spane, Risinger, Lengauer, Howard, Petinos, MeN'all. / ih R - Hansen, Giese, Hig- VftllMT ST I 1 1) 

^ins. Stumcke, LeBer. I VLUUi3lIjl\ 



First Row: Brancuas, Sturges, Gordon, London, Wu, Neville. Saxton. Austin. Ballard. Lewis. Lagrua. Ford, 

Simmons. Lovell, McCann, Fitzgerald, Wainwright, Yaworsky, Powell. Jones. Tl ■■ A w: McGanka, ECruzic, Hughes, 
Garton, Rice, Tomajczyk, Holmes. Commons. Fourth Roto: Smith, Hyatt. McGee, (iilstrap, Gibbons, Barry. P 
A' \ archo, Scykowski, Clark, Everett, Bradley, Hocy. Sixth Rota: Holds, Assell, Hanson, Buda. 



pie in; 





Avis 
Bibb 
Bradley 
Bullock 



Clements 
Cooper 
Cricbton 
DeLashmitt 



Disher 
Fraser 
Heckler 
Mahonv 



McKean 
Monto 
Morrow 
Murphy 



Nelson 
Patrick 
Poole 
Purvis 



Rodenbach 

Rosser 

Smollen 

Stoher 



Stone 
Swenson 
Swope 
Thompson 



Tirschheld 
Waterbury 
Weissinger 
Willes 



Worrell 
Wright 
Yarbrough 



FALL 



■■tib 


1 jL^ "m 


m 1 

B 

IF_B 

^V t^I ^H . 


. — ll-'v 




BV?~> t 


III 


1 ■ ■ 


Hi' '^^H ' 

I '■ ft * 


1 f t'j^f 







Northam, Dresser, Lvnch, Coolidge, Ohmen. 



WINTER 




Harrison, Bradtmiller, Anion, McGarry, Mclntyre. 




Lt. C. D. Summit, USN 




15TH 
COMPANY 




471 




16TH 
COMPANY 




Lt. R. H. Flood, USN 




Boshoven, Daus, Jacobson, I'oc, Macdonald. 

rr t rr m 




FALL 



Abbott 

Ash ford 

Bee 

Boyajian 



Boyce 
Browne 
Cannon 
Conner 



Daughenbaugh 

Durr 
Emery 



"ricdcrich 



Gibson 

Haven 

Hawk 



Herlihy 

llir>r 
I lockncy 
I lugulcy 



Mcars 

Melniek 

Ml H iris 

Nelson 



Newman 

Xikkola 

O'Brien 

Paasch 



Parcell 

Robinson, KF 

Robinson, RG 

Rothwell 



Seaman 

Shields 

Shoemaker 

Smith 



W'hi 



WINTER 

472 





First Row: Frustace, Scott, \\ .E., Peele, Fossett, Shane, Pivarmk, Myers, Larsen, Lucke, Nutting. Second Row: Gardy, 
Stallkamp, Eastman, Allender, Gates, Besecker, Anderson, Ferriter, Scott, D.L. Third Row: Skezas, Lackey, Grady, Stiff, 

YOIINT ^ITP R ^' es " McNutt, White, Ripley. Fourth Row: Haney, Gentile, Westphal, Wedell, Daringer, Schenck, Ryan. Fifth Row: Peterson, 

IVUl'lUljlIjIl Hofstedt, Larson, Thacher, Peltier, Lawrence. 



PLEBE 



First Row: Converse, Savel, Marvin, Winjum, Kelly, W., Cooper, Aten, Wainwright, Mulkern, Riddell. Second Rozv: Skelton, 
Minton, Anderson, J., Kambeitz, Jackson, Derickson, Redden, Armour, Ricci. Third Row: Smith, Kelly, J., Boissenin, 
Oliveri, Peterson, Gregory, Anderson, C, Varni. Fourth Row: Baker, Butler, Green, Menning, Little, James, Lynch. Fifth 
Row: Howell, Orr, Whinery, Hogan, King, Springer. Sixth Row: Williams, Klein, Leon, Hudson. 





F - I A' Fincgan, Demand. Waits. Cordova, Mueller, Bunting, McCain, I assett, Edewaard, Gre R Martin, 

\Ik-I, Brooks. Tinker, Stubbs, Rowton, MacNeill, <l.<i. Jones, II. '. ifcr, Frawley, Bruce, Williams. 

Sendelc, Pittengcr, Hamrick, Fales. / urti A' Glaser, Edwards, Hupp, Saunders, Schramm. Smith, Woods. I 
Higgins, Vargo, Dittrick, Muelhof, Mansfield. Hardy. Sixth Ron Gladding, Brewer, Wiklinski. Oli' 



YOUNGSTER 



First Rote: ECensinger, Heiges, Flikeid, Johnson. Crumpacker, Etcho, Harmuth, Hall, Tavlor, Byrne. 1)1 r I) r 

Higginbotham, Schlessinger, Green, Seeley, Tinsley, kallis. Gill, Horacek, Lidstad. Third Row: Kike, Morrison. McCarthy, I I, L l) L 

Forshier, Giersch, Krischker, O'Connor, C'ahoon. / A' Edwards, Sceburger, Bozzo, Dawdy, Dettbarn, Gabriclsen, 
Ralston. Fifth A' ::. Clements, Paepcke, Haworth, Arnold, I omlinson. Rvan. Mathicscn. 







HWPTO 



i > i 




474 




Acosta 
Anderson 
Andre 
Ballantine 



Drown 
Dunn 

Duppenthaler 
Eades 



Finley 
Gionis 
Heisner 
Hlava 



Jermstad 
Johnson 
Llewellyn 
Luke 



McClure 
McConnel 
McCoy 
McCullough 



Mclntyre 
McKee 
McMahon 
Molina 



Morency 
Murphy 
Newell 
Philipps 



Rempt 
Renner 
Sipes 
Smith 



Spackman 
Steiner 
Strickland 
Taylor 



Trippe 
Waite 
White 
Winters 




Doebler. Hicks. D.W. Johnston, Wagner. Brockway. 



WINTER 




Piatt. Kinney, Grahm, Clock, Caldwell. 




Capt. R. G. Hunt, USMC 




17TH 
COMPANY 




475 




18TH 
OMPANY 




Lt. W. T. Chipman, USN 




DiBona, Schmitt, Eyler, Hannah, Mann. 




FALL 



Bair, Dillon, Lloyd, Piske, Friedel. 




Anglim 

Baum 

Bays 

Bender 



Bortz 

Bower 

Bryant 

Burleigh 



Burns 

Clevenget 

Cloyd 

Didicr 



Fickenscher 

Frit/. 

i laouetce 

Giambacrisca 



i loldstein 
( Irccneisen 

< lni.it 
1 1. nullum 




[ngels 
Katz 
Kelly 



Kiefer 

Lampert 
Madouse 
Maguire 



Martin 

McManes, AS 

McMancs, KR 

McPherson 



Rau 

Rohsenberger 

Scales 

Schneidewind 



WINTER 



Schwalbe 

Thompson 

Trimpert 



476 





YOUNGSTER 



First Row: Thorn, Larson, Bernatz, Young, McCormick, Amend, Banta, Swain, Haltermann, Bellows. Second Row: Patten, 
Bassett, Lisle, Cunningham, Gottsche, Darab, Foley, Baldwin, Driggers. Third Rota: Gallagher, Budney, Berg, Hemingway, 
Cameron, Chevalier, Bartos, Wyatt. Fourth Row: Badger, Poindexter, Wright, Feldman, Aiken, Work, McConnell. Fifth 
Row: Caldwell, Kaufman, Stibler, Jensen, Bauer, Holmberg, Dougherty, Robbins. 



PLEBE 



First Row: LaSala. Schultz. Moore. Hulson, Curtis, Burns, Manly, Howard, Thornton, Reitelbach. Second Row: Szczypinski, 
Burrows, Forbes, Berkowitz, Schnauffer, Carwin, Bovey, Silvay, Brock. Third Row: McLeod, Henderson, Hildebrand. 
Stephans, Kilday, Corcoran, Handley, Comer. Fourth Row: Maguder, Boyle, Mott, O'Neil, Cronin, Griggs, Molnar. Fifth 
Row: Alexander. Collins, Granger. 




m ml* m f V 




9 % 9* *• 



477 



S.-;* _ mm .Mi 




First Row: Smedberg, Nickerson, Reistcr, Lamb, Radziej, Fox, McGarrigle, Roed, Gibbons, I vans. St - A' u Denny, 
Goui>h, Burden, Goodman, Hynes, McCandlcss, Jones. Wales, Potter. Third Row: Ford, Willingham, Schnepper, Withers, 
Merritt, Borden, McKenzie, Doyle. / urth k v: Mitchell, Craig, Yarbough, Brown, Buerger, Wilson, Well 
Simpson, Hcnning, Clement, Schlang, Patterson, Brewer. Sixth Row: Greeting, Felix Greer, Keith, Hall. 



YOUNGSTER 



First Row: lenney. Miller, Jarvis, March. Rees. Denny. Peters, Morgan, Winter. Keeley. Second Row: /.alisk. Kat/.. Batchelor, p I r I) r 
Merrini;. Sullivan, Denniston, Radccki. Todd. Solomon. Third Row: Hunt. Ramsey, I.E., Ramsey, .IB.. Henry. Jones. ILLDL 
Honadle, Shields, Ehlers. Fourth Row: Small. Gormley, Hassler. Mayes. Lynts, Levander, Woolridge. Fifth Row: Walker, 
Latond, Zuntag, I timer, Zacharias, Grady. Sixth Row: Smith. Anderson. Wheeler. McFarland. Kelly, Vance, Wommack. 




? 




Barker 
Britton 
Buck 
Christensen 



Coon 

Crowe 

Doby 

Fedenci 



Ford 

Gau tier 

Gawarkiewicz 

Gierhart 



Hamilton 
Handley 
Hathaway 
Hemphill 



Herring 
Hines 
Junker 
Kozlov 



Larson 
Layer 
Miller, DL 
Miller. PR 



Murdoch 
Norton 
O'Hara 
Peace 



Rosenbe 
Roush 
Sedano 
Strange 



Torres 
Vollmer 

Williams 



FALL 



1 


•^ 


test 


i Vv 




■ 11 

■ Wm 






\ r 




I ■ M 




! 


-ri^ 













Allen. Kautz. Lan^enheim. McHuj;h, \\ arkins 



WINTER 



• • 


f 




-" -— /s 


km / i" in toMMMMi 

*■•» ' "T i i urn 


^K^_ 





Cooper, Wilson, Anton, Barnhart, Pickel. 




Cant. T. D. Parsons, USMC 




19TH 
COMPAQ 




479 




20TH 
COMPANY 



LCdr. R. C. Barnhart, Jr., USN 





FALL 



Masterson, Barnes, Egan, McAlister, McLaughlin. 




WINTER 



Altergott 

Atkinson 

Babbin 

Balding 



Barker 

Bass 

Benjes 

Brown. PL 



Brown. RM 

Brown. RR 

Cameron 

( 'arson 



Clearwater 
Converse 

Court 
Craig 



DcVito 

Ducore 

Dulik 

Ellsworth 



Flora 

Follmcr 

Hamilton 

1 lansborough 



Homnick 
Ma/.ik 
Mohn 

Nygaard 



O'Neill 

Prahalis 

Purvis 

Regenhardt 



Sawyer 

SchafFer 

Scheible 

Ulrich 



Walker 
West 



480 





First Row: Carty, Troolin, Goldenstein, Sturr, Lloveras, Sutman, D'Armand, Timmer, Healey, Russell. Second Row: Denny, 

Frazier, Cox, Yoder, Rosenberg, Frank, Haenze, Harvey, Hoerle. Third Row: McAleer, Day, Weatherson, Deegan, Warley, 

YftllNP STPR Mann, Willmarth, Stremic. Fourth Row: Maloney, Minar, Harriss, Studer, Carestina, Larzelere, Schmidt. Fifth Row: Hod- 

1 V II 11 U l3 1 lift kins, Taylor, Paige, Ruby, Symmes, Wilhelmy. Sixth Row: Smith, Thornton, Studebaker, Stiller, Rogers, Farnan, Herner. 



PLEBE 



First Row: Sisson, Roberts, Ravvls, SchafFer, Smith, Carter, Oneto, Cavanaugh, Morgan J. P., Egan. Second Row: Harris. 
Mulrooney, Emerson, Sheppard, Poe, Prendergast, Morgan D.E., Powell, Denman. Third Row: Moellmer, Poxon, Nash, 
Easterling, Castro, Christy, Powers, Darby R.M. Fourth Row: Darby P.H., Robinson, Hartman, Snodgrass, Williams, 
Doyle, Davis. Fifth Row: Hewitt, Shenton, Overman, Dickinson, Witt, Edgerton. 



m~ "-IB 



%1 


f 




•• »* 



I . . it 



481 



— m n it I k & & 

s. . mm , . mm. . 9l*.^ iria 1 





First Row: Green, Polk, McMillan, Gallagher, Dalberg, Mowery, C'rcsko, Beam, Estep, Hcndrix. Se one A' - Lyons, Fisler, 
Farney, Williams, Means, Flynn, Boj le, MacLean, Gordon. Third A' ■ ■ McNulcy, Sinnott, Forrestal, McNamara, DePaolo, 
Beggs, Peters, Harshberger. /' urti A' Donahoe, Porter, Craig, Nagle, Eppling, Hummer, Bohan, Da 



YOUNGSTER 



First Row: Steidle, Martin, Akens, Walls, Barliot. Benson, Brons. Lazarchick, Wilson, Cohen. St< ■ . A' Houley, Perry, 1)1 V I) r 
Carey, Bromwell, Anderson, Littlefield, Upton, Bolt/.. Reynolds. '/' ird A' • Slash, Oakes, Schultz, Duran, Fraime, Cooper, • LLDL 
Culliton, Guay. Brezina, 1 oone, Morrison. Wright, Eastwood, Stephenson, Gunther. , I !eist, Valen- 

tine, Schneider, Hansen. Libert, Smith. 




^»i*M*Vp 



I II 

I ■ • 




482 



Aronson 
Baker 



FALL 



WINTER 





Medwedeff. O'Connell Landis, Powell, Millia 




Mcljrail Groepler, Ransom. Franklin. Davis. Smith. 

Missailidis 



Piuett 


X 


Rositzke 


Rosselott 




Sliea 


^^m .^fl 


Smalley 




Solomon 


^■^ 


Stuart 


LCdr. A. T. Ford. USN 


Svvartz 




\ azquez 




Waring 




Warner 


■■■H|HH 


Whaley 
Whipple 
Whiting 


21ST 


Woods 


COMPANY 


1 






483 




22ND 
COMPANY 



Cant. R. D. Rosencrans. USMC 





FALL 



Smallman. Booth. Olson. Catola. DeNezza. 




WINTER 

4S4 



Anderson 

Barnum 

Brazzon 

Broun 



Chelius 

Cliwatek 

Clark 

Eley 



Goldstone 

Haven 

Horsefield 

Kay 



Keating 

Kelly 

Livingston 

l.\ nch 



Magnet 

Mas ten 

McGuigan 

McKcnna 



Merle 

Meyer 

Moore 

O'Connell 



Parnell 
Robillard 

Rotondi 
Rovsdon 



Schulte 

Severance 

Shay 

Sheppard 



Somerset 
Stuart 
Tncca 
Vieira 



Writ: In 
Zeberlein 





P"'m" ' jfc : m fc : * ■*' mr~ : m m If 



9| *,% 



/ • • / 




YOUNGSTER 



First Row: Wright, Alvarez, Reynolds, Rennie. Conley, Bennett, Dean, Wyatt, HofFer, Burket, Surratt. Second Row: Bred- 
beck, Smith, Bumgardner, Fuller, Webster, Igoe, Dnscoll, Anderson, Narro, Synder. Third Row: West, Brown, Mulhn, 
Harper, Evans, Lucas, Hayes, Marshall, Lawe. Fourth Row: Brooks, Caldwell, Fennell, Mulladv, Kandra, Forrestel, Tucker, 
Mayhew, Morgan, O'Neill. 



DT VDf First Row: Pippin, Vaver, Krimsier, Scott, Whitehead, Bishop, Cook, Reed, Zimmerman, Bray. Second Row: Flammger, 
I L L I) Ij Cather, Vaughn, Campbell, Auchy, Fritzinger, Crist, Cant, Silvers. Third Row: Gantt, Merz, Mayo, Ovrom, Burnett, Gosen, 

Bednarek, Barkman. Fourth Row: Booth, DrotlifF, Bainbridge, Moore, Davis, Bogdan, Costigan. Fifth Row: Bannan, Severs, 

Bailer, Den-Otter, Kanuck, Wiedman, Dachos. 




*' - V W . i W # # m 

fL~ # -v ■■&>*■. wSi w -* ! A ; *L'f 




9* &% 



485 



^ m '- -*- ™ Hr ji , Hr 



*'U 



H * « 



* *> »i 



■JLkJi..liL!JiLiLiuLk 



— - 




A' 



First Rote: Whittenberg, Elliott, Estcs, Foreman, Dawson, Owens, Masterson, Pierce, fhompson, Brcncc. S V 
Coyle, Krumrei, Hump. Blatt, Clement, Johnson R.L., Cheney, Ondishko, Gladin. / lohnson R.V., Lawrence, 

Lindsey, Medina, Saner, Tavlor, O'Beirne, Gibson I rty, VVerbcl, Strybel, Miller, Johnson L.O., Day, Clason. 

Fifth Row. (,'orev. Buck. O'Connor. Port. 



YOUNGSTER 



Fir I Rote: Moynahan, Adams. Richter, McAree, Marks. Zurawaski, Cullen, Stratton, Lamberson, LaB 1)1 rni 1 

Lawler, Woodman. McCarthy, Mancy, Turner, Lynas, Hays, Knimm. I Ibcrland I iarvcrick, Mahoney, McBride, I LLDE 

Santos. Rhodes, Kim;. Hunter, Martin. /' urth Rote: Keny, Knapp, Schindlcr, Machesky, Kinch, Abercrombie, Gilmer. 
Fifth Rote: Grimmell, Welsh, McCall, Herlihy, Monaghan, Vandling Wiscnbacker, Link, Garbacz, Cole. 








Albertson 
Aldenderfer 
Ballon 
Brookes 



Brooks 
Campbell 
Chiistensen 
Cochrane 



Crandal 
Davis 
Duffley 
Fannin 



Fox 

Gleneck 
Hall 
Hamel 



Inglisa 
Jensen 
Kachigian 
Knanf 



Knntson 
Kompa 
Lisa 
Lleuellvn 



Marcotte 
McHugh 
Pelphrey 
Peterson 



Round 
Samborsky 
Satava 
Stiller 



Swanson 
Wattay 
Wiesenauer 



FALL 



i& ^RJBE-TBBfciHKwlH 


A 


-m— ^TlW-fa est 




■ Y^TT 


i 41m R *~ 


>~-a i iJ 


1 flH KJ^ 


■j ft » 


r ?'. a 


«^e:«.f,i;:.:^..-*4^»:- ^H ^H 


K'"^ 



Evans. Parent. Howell, Higgins, Culberson. 



WINTER 




Schade, Brunner. Shafer, Adams, Tburber. 




Lt. W. P. Gatewood, USN 




487 




24TH 
COMPANY 




LCdr. P. V. Purkrahck, USN 




Aucr, Bauman, Smith, Hoffman 


LaMotte 


- SSF 1 ^ • / 


-f 

^^j) 




.9 1 IB II |B ^1 


{ il 


r ■■1 1 j| PI 


W - 


^l^^^^fp | *^ 




j9^ u p 


'■ ' 


^HHHB 1 y. 







FALL 



Eri, Miller, Scott, Schwartz, Bigler. 




WINTER 



Andreotta 
Atwell 
Baker 
Beans 




488 




4, 



K t I 

f- .'t-f Jl -J- 




nw 



,■ f ' J , % M * -jilt • A* . :|t 






I I 



YOUNGSTER 




/"irji Roiv: Hanna, Laing, Cooper, Therrien, Buchanan, Gilligan, Rasmussen, Demers, Ojealehto, Ricaurte. SecondRow: 
Russo, Simpson, Klinedinst, Friedman, Concklin, Kunz, Knox, Moran, Daugherty. Third Row: Leonard, Lanoue, Wood, 
Klos, Gregg, Trotman, Oleson, Moulton, Fourth Rom: Hill, Pierce, Sloan, Hernandez, Hanavan, Schriver, Newman. Fifth 
Row: Nystrom. Johnson, Leary, Magrath, Roder, Sloan, Gatje, Haynes, Pate. 



PLEBE 



First Row: Evans, Ransom, Zitzewitz, Roberts, Heiman, Jacobs. Sears, Russell, Hill, Estes. Second Row: Osburn. Dodd. 
Rose, Burke, Owen, Talbert, Franklin, Weaver, Johnson D.C. Third Row: Nickel, Wardlow, Featherstone, Arlington. Hilt. 
Kohl, Koch. Franchi. Fourth Row: Casey, Susag, Schick, Johnston R., Carter, Yenchko, Long. Fifth Row: Holroyd, Dorsey, 
Anderson, Brown, Nolan, Strohshal, Wilson. 




t ■ ¥ t t i , i I t I t :I t f r t 



• « 91 |« 



9 « 9* 



489 



T ', -: .*"!, - .Bi Br. j- ™ « -"^^5?E 



NAVY LINE 



Adams, F.G. 
Ahrens, M.C. 
Alexander, S.G. 
Allen, G.M., Jr. 
Anion, R.L. 
Anthony, J.D., Jr. 
Ashworth, T., Ill 
Audilet, G.O. 
Bachman, R.A. 
Bair, L.H. 
Baker, R.E. 
Ball, G.F. 
Bennett. P.C. 
Betts, R.S. 
Beving, D.U. 
Bigler. WAV. 
Biles, G.E. 
Bud, R.G. 
Black, I.L. 
Blanchard. J.W., Jr. 
Boebert, F.L., Jr. 
Boensch, A.C 
Borden, C. \. 
Bosserr, J.L. 
Brown, X. 
Brunner, LW. 
Bruso, J.W. 
Buchanan, C.A., Jr. 
Bullis. W.C. 
Burdick, H.F., Jr. 
Burke, F... Ill 
Burt, M.A., [r. 
Burt. R.H. 
Cannon, f.R. 
Carre. D.M., Jr. 
Catola, S.G. 
Charneco, CM.. Jr. 
Chester, S.A. 
Clark, |.M. 
Clav, l.D. 
Clock, R.V. 
Coleman, C.E., jr. 
Collier. M.F. 
Collins, L., Jr. 
Cook. R.E. " 
Coolidge, I.L. II 
Cory, D.J. 
Costilow, K.L. 
Covey, E. ]. 
Cyr, B.A. 
Daus, R.H. 
DeNunzio, X.J. 
Deutermann, DAY. 
DiBona, C.J. 
Diedrich, R".E. 
Doebler. H.J.. II 
Dresser, R.A. 
Eagye, V.A. 



Egerton, J.W. 
Elinski, M., [r. 
Ellis, H.R.. Ill 
Eylar. F.P. 
Farren, T.J. 
Fischer, T.A., Jr. 
Fitzwilliam, P.K. 
Fjelsted, D.L. 
Flack, F.P. 
Foumier, P.R. 
Freeman, I.L. 
Fulk, G.A. 
Gaines, R.S. 
Gamharani, P.R. 
Garrison. C.H., Jr. 
Gaylor, E.L. 
Ghering, W.L. 
Gillman, f.W. 
Gluse, M.R. 
Graf, I'D. 
Grant, \.L\ 
( Ireen, ( I.E. 
( In ( n. W.I I. 
Grimes, D.I.. 
Groepler, N.F. 

Hale. F.W. 
Hams. R.H. 
Hatch. R.R. 
I la\ man, D.F., Jr. 
Heisinger, D.L. 
Hejhall, R.C. 
Henry, A.L. 
Henry, F.A., |r. 
Henry, W.F. 
Hicks, I.R. 
Hobbs, F.W.. HI 
Hoffman, C.F. 
Hogg. J.R. 
Hohenstein, C.G. 
Honsinger, V.C. 
Hovatet. A.K. 
Howell, W.J. 
Hudgens. R.C. 
Hull. W.S. 
Hussey. H.W. 
Ingram, F.L. 
Jaeger, R.H. 
Janetatos. J. P. 
Jarratt, G.C., III 
Jennings, W.E. 
Jensen. R.S. 
Jernee, A.L. 
Johnson. J.E. 
Johnston, D.H.. Jr. 
Jones, D.E. 
Jones, J.E. 
Jordan, H.M. 
Keegan, A.E. 



Keller, R.M. 
Kelso, F.B., II 
Kenaston, G.W. 
Kinett, I.H. 
Klein, M.A. 
Krieger, T.R. 
Kuykendall, H.B. 
La Barge, W.A. 
LaMotte, F.J. 
Langenheim, J. P. 
Langley, T.R., fr. 
Leahy, P.G. 
Lewin, I.E. 
Lewis, U.S. 
Lloyd, D.B. 
Macan, J.J. 
Macdonald, M.I. 
Malloy, M.A. 
Mann, R.J. 
Maston, l.ll.. Ill 
McBride, M.A. 
.McClure, D.R. 
McCoy, J.C.. Jr. 
McGarry, f.C. 

Mel high. R.I.. |r. 

McLaughlin, I.R. 

McMillan. L.O. 
McPartland, E.J. 
McPherson, \. \. 
MedwedefF, C.W. 
Miller. H.H., Ir. 
Miller. I.M.. jr. 
Miller, K.L. 
Minton, D.C., III 
Moore, H.A., Jr. 
Morris. A.R. 
Morris, R.B. 
Mortimer, F.C. 
Mozier, R.A. 
Mulloy, C.S. 
Murray, F.S. 
Nelson, P. J.. Jr. 
Newcomb, J.W., Ir. 
Xortham. T. \.. Ir. 
O'Connell. D.B." 
O'Connell, J. A. 
O'Dwyer, K.M. 
Ogram, D.T. 
Ohmen, D.L 
Owen, J.L. 
Parker, E.H. 
Pattin, S.M. 
Peterson, K.L. 
Pickel. T.C., Jr. 
Price. W.H.. II 
Randrup. P.X. 
Ransom. LP.. II 
Rich, W.S. 



Roberts, C.R. 
Roberts, R.D. 
Rodgers. R.D. 
Roper, V.W. 
Ryan, T.M. 
Sackett, D.R., Jr. 
Sargent, S.E. 
Scanlon, R.J. 
Schick, H.A. 
Schildhauer, F.W. 
Schilling, G.F. 
Schoessel, W.M., Jr. 
Schweiger, M.B. 
Scott. W.W. 
Seesholtz, f.R. 
Shafer, R.W. 
Shelso, I). \. 
Shinn, R.A. 
Shulrz, T.B. 
Sibley, D.N. 
Simpson, G.T.K. 
Simpson, W.I I. 
Slough, J.II. 
Smith. H.L., |r. 
Smith. f.W. 
Smith, \.M. 
Spink, P.J. 
Stammer, W.I [., Jr. 
Stefanou, CM. 
Sterling, J.C. 
Stevenson, CD. 
Stinson, J.W. 
Swanson, H.D., Ir. 
Taff, CO.. |r. 
Talbert, J.T., Jr. 
Tarbuck, R.R. 
Tatom, F.B. 
Thomas, |.( i. 
Toohey, F.L., Jr. 
Townsend, J.'B. 
Van Metre. LM. 
Ward. CE. 
Webster. J. A., Jr. 
Weggeland, D. 
Welsh, G.T. 
Wharton, E.K. 
Williams. F.R. 
W.lson, E.J. 
Wise, S.A. 

Woodburv, O.L.. Ill 
Woods, H.P. 
Wootten, C.B., Jr. 
Wright, I.M.P., fr. 
Wright, O., Jr. 
Zechlin, F.F. 
Zimmerman, R.W. 



490 



NAVY AIR 



Andrade, A.L. 
Anton, L.G. 
Apple, J.D., Jr. 
Baals, J.R. 
Baldwin, M.M. 
Barnhart, H.D. 
Bauman, J.M. 
Bellinger, J.R. 
Benson, T.C. 
Berg, R.F. 
Bittner, G.J. 
Booth, P.B. 
Box, R. E. 
Brainerd, P.C. 
Brockway, C.J., Jr. 
Brown, R.H.. Ill 
Bruyere, T.E. 
Bush, V.R. 
Byng, W.H. 
Caldwell, J.M. 
Carlson, W.G. 
Carrigan, R.C. 
Clark, B.A. 
Clark, G.G. 
Cook, R.D. 
Cook, W.P. 
Cooper, J.L. 
Copeland, J.R. 
Corkins, C.W., Jr. 
Craig, R.J. 
Craven, R.P. 
Davidson, P.J. 
Dickerson, K.A. 
Dillard, E.K. 
Donahue, J.F. 
Donovan, M. 
Drayton, F.J. 
Dudrow, D.L. 
Dyer, N.B. 
Edwards, J.D. 
Elpers, W.W. 
Evans, F.H. 
Evans, J. A. 
Everett, W.A. 



Eyler, A.T., Jr. 
Fallin, J.W. 
Fellowes, J.H. 
Fesler, R.J. 
Flannery, G.J., Jr. 
Flatley, J.H., II 
Flight, J.W., Jr. 
Foote, E.W. 
Forster, R.M. 
Friedel, J.W., Jr. 
Furlong, G.M., Jr. 
Good, G.E. 
Graham, F.M. 
Hannah, S.W. 
Hanson, D.C. 
Hanson, M.H. 
Hicks, H.E. 
Hill, R.W. 
Hoerner, F.C. 
Hoffman, H.F., Jr. 
Home, R.B., Jr. 
Horvath, D.L. 
Husted, M.E., Jr. 
Isaac, P.D. 
Ishol, L.M. 
James, E.W. 
Jenson, G.S. 
Johnston, D.W. 
Kemper, R.D. 
Kinney, B.J. 
Kirkpatrick, J.H. 
Koutas, S.D. 
Lakey, J.D. 
Lally, J.J. 
Laub, B.R., Jr. 
Lenhardt, H.F., Jr. 
Levendoski, R.J. 
Lind, F.J. 
Lindquist, D.E. 
Lippert, F.G., III 
Lowden, L.A. 
Maines, H.L. 
Mayfield, D.S. 
Mays, S.E., Jr. 



McAlister, R.F., Jr. 
McCravy, J.R., Jr. 
McDermott, R.J.F. 
McDowell, W.I., Jr. 
Michaels, D.J. 
Miller, W.H. 
Miller, W.W. 
Milne, J.L. 
Morgan, G.E., Jr. 
Morris, C.S. 
Mossop, W.L., Jr. 
Musgrove, W.M. 
Nagel, L.D. 
Nelson, C.A. 
Nelson, S.V. 
Neuhard, H.H. 
Newbury, A.C. 
Nicholson, M.M.J., Jr. 
O'Keefe, W.J. 
Oliverio, T.E. 
Osgood, W.R. 
Owings, D.C. 
Petersen, R.D. 
Peterson, P.C, Jr. 
Poe, B.L., Jr. 
Powell, W.W. 
Putnam, J.C. 
Reed, A.E., Jr. 
Reese, P.J. 
Rigler, D.V. 
Roberts, N.C. 
Robertson, H.E. 
Sampson, R.J. 
Sams, H.P. 
Schatz, R.G. 
Scheyder, E.J. 
Schmidt, R.H. 
Schmidt, V 
Schneider, W. 
Schulze, J.M., Jr. 
Schreiner, R.J. 
Schwartz, R.C. 
Scott, T.P. 
Sechrest, E.A. 



Seip, A., Jr. 
Short, B.F. 
Shumaker, R.H. 
Sikes, J.H. 
Slaughter, W.T. 
Sloan, W.D. 
Smiley, R.R., III 
Smith, P.J. 
Smith, W.R. 
Snyder, R.C. 
Spellman, F.G. 
Stone, L.P. 
Sullivan, G.F. 
Teachout, D.S. 
Thompson, B.G. 
Thurber, J.D. 
Tibbits, B.F. 
Topping, D.N. 
Tyler, M.F., Jr. 
Wagner, J. A. 
Walker, B.F. 
Watkins, R.L. 
Weidman, R.H. 
White, L.A., Jr. 
White, R.F. 
Wilbern, J.M. 
Wilde, J.H., Jr. 
Wilkins, G.H. 
Wilson, C.N. 
Woodruff, G.L. 



. 




491 



AIR FORCE AIR 



Armstrong, S.M. 
Arnold, J.R. 
Arnold, S.W.N. 
Barker, J.N. 
Berger, L.W. 
Black, W.H. 
Block, E.N., Jr. 
Boshoven, B.W. 
Bryant, R.G. 
Buddie, J.W. 
Cecil, R.S. 
Chart! and, I). P. 
Collins, J. B. 
Colman, T.M. 
Culberson, H.F., 
Curtis, C.G. 
Cusick, P.B. 
Dander, V.A. 
Davis. S.F., 111 
Decell, G.M., 111 
Dillon, W.M. 



Dolph, B.H. 

Ernst, r".H. 
Fales, P.B.V. 
Faust, D.O. 
Flaherty. D.l. 
Forbnck. J.W. 
Francis, B.L. 
Frankenberg, R. 
Frith, N.L.H., II 
Gardella. S.G.. Jr. 
Garges, D.T. 
Gibson, J.E, 
Gollehon, G.B. 
Gossins, G.F. 
Greene, R..M. 
Hackeling, C.C. 
Haddad. A.G. 
Hagenmever, W.H., Jr. 
Hanna. H.E., Jr. 
Hansen, C.J., Jr. 
Hansen. YV. 




Harris. L.F. 
Hugdahl, D.L 
Jacobson, R.I 1. 
James. E.C. 
Johnston, ].\{. 
Jones, \i.\).. I.. 
Karas, J. 
Kautz. J.< I 
Kelly. J.D. 
Koerkenmeier, L.J 
Lajeunesse. D.W. 
Lampsa, T.C., Jr. 
Levis. C.A. 
Maio. A.D. 
Marr, L.O. 
Masterson, J. P. 
Missler. C.W. 
M.tri. C.L.. Jr. 
Murphy, D.P. 
Murray, C.H.. Jr. 
Olds, E.A. 



Olson, J.K. 
Palmer, D.L. 
Park, R.E. 
Petch, K.M. 
Peterson, C.I). 
Peterson, G.W., Jr. 
Reagan, G. 
Romero, R.S. 
Rosenhauer, G.L. 
Schaefer, J.E. 
Smith, R.E. 
Stewart. W.H. 
Sullivan, P.L. 
Textor, G.P. 
Tucker, R.P. 
Weisner, T.L. 
Weltman, B.I. 
White, F.D. 
Wolverton, J.R. 
Wood, J.A.F. 



492 



AIR FORCE GROUND 



Alser, D.J. 
Barlow, A.E. 
Bauduit, H.S. 
Benzi, L.F. 
Brandt, T.C. 
Buckelew, J.W. 
Burgle, N.A. 
Brown, R.J., Jr. 
Chavarria, C.N. 
Coker, C.F. 
Conway, J.E. 
Davis, J.R. 
Debus, D.L. 
Delgado, A.L. 
DeNezza, E.J. 
Denham, W.S., Jr. 
Detore, J.V. 
DeVoll, N.O. 
Dunsavage, W.P. 
Dwyer, M.J., Jr. 
Eggert, D.C. 
Elliott, J.E. 



Eri, J. P. 
Ferriter, P.G. 
Fleming, R.J. 
Flood, D.T. 
Gauthreaux, S.E., Jr. 
George, G.W. 
Godstrey, K.H. 
Groner, S.L. 
Guest, R.P., Jr. 
Haddock, H.A. 
Hadley, F.R. 
Hansen, E.E. 
Heidrich, G.C. 
Here, R.T. 
Hopewell, F.N. 
Hubert, L.J. 
Kamp, J. J., Jr. 
Kauffman, R.H. 
Leave}', G.B., Jr. 
Lewis, R.H. 
Lovely, E.C. 




Lyle, R.H. 
Lynch, T.C. 
Mackey, J.B. 
Magagna, J.F. 
Mclntyre, J.R., Jr. 
Mercuro, G.J. 
Mushalko, G. 
Myers, B., Ill 
Nelson, J.F. 
Niles, W.H. 
Noonan, D.J. 
O'Hara, M.A., Jr. 
Piatt, R.E., Jr. 
Parent, E.J. 
Pilcher, C.A. 
Piske, A.A., Jr. 
Pitzer, G.E. 
Pope, J.D. 
Schoep, J.C. 
Schwartz, T. 
Shannon, W.C. 
Sheehan, L.J. 



Shewchuk, R.G 
Shortridge, J.C, Jr. 
Soltesz, S.A. 
Stockham, L.W. 
Swanenburg, R. 
Steele, B.L. 
VanRy, CD. 
Vaselenko, R.F. 
Visage, J.R. 
Warner, G.A. 
Warren, R.H. 
Weigold, G.W., Jr. 
Westerhausen, J.W. 
Wbitaker, W.E. 
White, G.T. 
Widner, R.L. 
Williams, O.E., Jr. 
Wilson, P.J., Jr. 
Wolff, M.T. 
Wood, J.E. 
Zehnder, R.E. 



493 



USMC 



Aitchison, D.E. 
Andrews, C.T. 
Auer, W.C., Jr. 
Barnes, H.F. 
Beagle, R.G. 
Braun, R.G. 
Brokaw, J.C. 
Brown, R.S., Jr. 
Crone, F.W. 
Cronin, I .J., Jr. 
Doerner, W .C. 
Douglas, D.M. 
Edgar, T.R. 



Egan. J. J. 
Fazekas, A.E. 
Ford. P.I). 
Franklin, C.R. 
Granger, A.L. 
Gulick, R.M.. Jr. 
Hart, M.A., 111 
Henry. R.T. 
Herndon, D.C. 
I [opkins, J. I. 
Klingensmith, (.'.II. 
Knettles, C.E. 
Kosteskv, R.M. 



Lamb, R.S. 
Landis, J.L. 
Lew is, F.J. 
' Lundberg, I) I). 
Lynch, J.D., Jr. 
Massey, S.C. 
McGrath, D.R. 
Milligan, R.F. 
Monson, CI... Jr. 
Motherway, R.T. 
Murtland, J.B., 111 
O'Shea, C.J., Jr. 
Perry, C.R. 



Phillips, K.E. 
Sasso, L.C. 
Shigley, R.T. 
Shillinglaw, J.S. 
Smallman, J. 
Smith. J.W. 
Sullivan, I). I.. 
Taylor, T.W. 
Trent, \. 
Varney, R.S. 
Wills, W.M. 
Wuertz, J.B. 



494 




RESTRICTED LINE and STAFF CORPS 



SUPPLY CORPS 



Allen, R.A., Jr. 
Baricev, V.J. 
Binns, J.R. 
Booth, S.L. 
Boyd, J.S. 
Broyles, G.D. 
Buckley, J.E. 
Butts, W.S., Jr. 
Connolly, G.S. 
Coyne, D.E. 
Dickey, J. A. 



Dolenga, H.E. 
Eaton, T.E., Jr. 
Gervais, J. J., Jr. 
Harmon, R.G. 
Higgins, E.C.M. 
Hobson, E.N. 
Hunt, W.S. 
Kennedy, D.E. 
Kriner, L.B.W. 
Legendre, J.R. 
Loveday, W.J. 



McCool, P.R. 
McCullers, L.E. 
McMuIlen, F.D., Jr. 
Oaks, J.G., Jr. 
Orange, J.E. 
Osgood, D.C. 
Perrone, L.A. 
Peters, W.A. 
Pfeiffer, L.J. 
Prokop, J.S. 
Sacarob, D.A. 



Smith, ED. 
Stiles, W.H. 
Stone, D.N. 
Tobin, I.L., III 
Walsh, R.S. 
Westmoreland, P.L. 
White, J.A. 
Williams, R.L. 
Woodward, C, Jr. 
Wrobel, E.A. 
Zabrycki, E.A. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING CORPS 



Baggs, C.C. 
Bradtmiller, P.H. 



Quinn, R.E., Jr. 
Schade, R.A., Jr. 



Shanley, J. J., Jr. 
Whelan, I.E. 



ENGINEERING DUTY ONLY 



Thomas, R.L. 



Taylor, J.M. 



NAVAL INTELLIGENCE 



Bennett, E.I.H., Jr. 
Burdsall, M.E. 



Harrison, JW. 
Moore, N.E. 



Schmitt, R.W. 
Wilson, J.S. 



Allen, R.O., Jr. 
Brown, D.L. 



COMMUNICATIONS 

McEachen, A.D., III 
Schleicher, C. 



Wright, F.E. 



PURLIC INFORMATION 

Scovel, F.D. 



Brillantes, V.J. 



FOREIGN NATIONALS 

Sanchez-Carrion, M.E. Viray, W.D. 



Cusachs, L.C. 



NOT PHYSICALLY QUALIFIED FOR COMMISSION 



Houghton, R. 



Skene, W.B. 



Weeks, E.W., Jr. 



495 



FOR THOSE WE LEFT BEHIND 



It only took a short time for all of us to get acquainted during Plebe Summer. With a common 
goal before us we found a unity of purpose and a feeling of comradeship among our classmates. 
We all realized the difficulties oi the road which lay before us and the countless obstacles which 
would inevitably prove insurmountable to some. As the months and years rolled by we watched 
regretfully as our ranks grew thinner. Names we had come to know as friends and shipmates 
became subjects of notices read in the messhall. Now. as we don our officers' uniforms, we pause 
to remember those no longer in our midst, but who shall always be members of the Class of 1956 



kher, I. P. 
Allfrey, W.D. 
Allison, H.C. 
Allman, R.B. 
Ammann, \ .R. 
Andersen, 11) 
Anderson, D.E. 
Anderson, l).( !. 
Andrews, A. \. 
Arnold, }.}. 
\i rigan, R.F. 
\iuood, |.R. 
Babel, HAY. 
Kaker. R.W. 

Baker, T.K. 
Ballance, R.G. 

Ballard. II. T. 
Bannerman, C.A. 
Barlow, L.F. 
Barnes, F.W. 
Beason. M.S. 
Beaver, L.E. 
Beilharz, J.V. 
Benjamin, T.E. 
Benninger, I.. I). 
Benson, R.O. 
Biavs. W.T. 
Blizzard. R.E. 
Bobbitt, B.L. 
Bosso, A.J. 
Boyle. B.H. 
Brantley, R.L. 
Brown, R.J. 
Brown. S.R. 
Browne, E.H. 
Bruner, R.W. 
Brush, C.K. 
Buck. W.P. 
Bull, l.C. 
Burks, R.E. 
Burnette. S. 



Busey, W.M. 
Byrom, 1. 1. 
Caldwell, 11.11. 
Cantrell, R.W. 
Carroll, |.D. 
Carter, H.E. 
Carter. R.S. 
Ca\ anaugh, J.\ . 
Chapman, D.L. 
Chapman, III. 

Chiles. S.W. 

Choate, W.S. 
Christiansen, G.B. 
Christopherson, J.N. 
Christos, P.M. 

Cleveland. II. \. 
Cline, A. I). 
Cochran, R.B. 
Cohen, H.C. 
Cohn, N.M. 
Cohn, R.M. 

Colbert. E.C. 
Collins. M.I.. 
Connors. J.E. 
Conney, J. A. 
Cooper, P.C. 
Cover, L.W. 
Cowell. W.G. 
Cox. G.P. 
Crawford, \\ .A. 
Cremer, B.J. 
Crockett, J.M. 
Crumpacker, H.L. 
Cunniff, S. J. 
Duffley, J.C. 
Dahlkemper, D.L. 
Darden, J.R. 
Dannenbrink, H.A. 
Davenport. H.E. 
Day. C.R. 
Deacon, A. R.L. 



Dean, C.L. 

Dean. |.!.. 
DeC ili». R.A. 

Decker, E.D. 

Denton, C.B. 
I )ioguardi, V.E. 
T)oherty, P.J. 
I )onoho, C. I). 
Dougherty, f.S. 
Drew, R.A. 
Dubois. L.E. 
Dugger, R.W. 
Duvo, J.A. 

'1 in. C.R. 
Edwards, A.R. 
Edwards, H.E. 
Edwards, |.C. 
I gan, D.M. 
England, R.A. 
England, T.L. 
Epling, J.A. 
Esche, K.H. 
Etter, f.W. 

Fisher. R.J. 
Fey. R.C. 
Falciano, J.A. 
Farrington, L. \ 
Fawcett, J.A. 
Feenev. .\LT. 
Filley," L.D. 
Finaldi, A.E. 
Fitzgerald, f.R. 
Flariry. P.S. 
Fogartv. [.R. 
Forby. D>. 
Fortson, [.C. 
Fowler. R.W. 
Fnck. I. A. 
Gahr. C.R. 
Gall, CD. 
Gardes, LP. 



Garr, J.C. 

( iiannonatti, C.A. 

Gibson, J.D. 

( !oen, J.J. 

( ionzales, D. 

Graham, I. P. 

I 1, v'r. 

Greene, P.J. 
( Jreenleaf, W ,T. 
Grill, R.J. 
Guinan, T. |. 
Huber,O.R. 
Hagnee, T.I I. 
Hagan, R.ll. 
Hagedorn, |. 
Hah-, W.B. 
Hamilton, R. 
I larding, F.S. 
Harris. W.D. 
Hart. T.J.X. 
Hayward, ( 5.J. 
Hattings, C. I. 
Hearn, H.C. 
Helandee, D.P. 
Hendrickson, \.C. 
Herig, W.E. 
Hesketh, S. 
Hey ward, S.D. 
Hickman, J.K. 
Hinman, L. |. 
HofF, J.W. " 
Hogue, R.L. 
Hohl, R.L. 
Hollingsworth, |.P. 
Holmes, D.(. 
Honeyrield. H.R. 
Hoppe, C.T. 
Hotchkiss, E.G. 
Hughes. D.B. 
Hughes, T. \. 
Illick. E.R. 



496 



Inge, B.M. 
Ingold, J.H. 
Israel, M.M. 
Jacobson, CD. 
James, R.K. 
James, T.P. 
Jean, S.T. 
Johnson, H.C. 
Johnson, J.L. 
Johnson, J. P. 
Johnson, L.W. 
Johnson, W.H. 
Jones, C.V. 
Kemble, W.J. 
Kerby, J.J. 
King, A.S. 
Kelly, A. P. 
Kacmarcik, F. 
Kemp, M.J. 
Kent, A.T. 
Kernes, H.E. 
Kettleband, D. 
Kimball, G.S. 
King, E.R. 
Klaassen, C.F. 
Kozuma, H.M. 
Kramer, W.B. 
Lenhart, M.M. 
Lamberson, T.O. 
Lang, A.R. 
Lannon, CM. 
Larson, A.J. 
Law, J. 
Lawson, J. P. 
Layne, R.P. 
LeCompte, J.H. 
Leggett, W.D. 
Leslie, W.N. 
Long, E.F. 
Lubelski, J.T. 
Lucas, J. A. 
Lutz, P.T.A. 
McShane, R.'C. 
Morgan, T.A. 
McLean, D.F. 
MacDonald, A.W. 
MacNamara, J.P. 
Mahan, R.D. 
Mann, E.N. 
Marshall, R.T. 
Martin, D.R. 
Martin, R.E. 



Martinko, J.J. 
Matthews, E.V. 
McAuliffe, D.C 
McClure, S.L. 
McCord, R.N. 
McCrae, J.P. 
McDaniel", R.E. 
McDonald, M.F. 
McDonough, T.R. 
McEwen, J.R. 
Mclnerncy, P.E. 
Mclntyre, S. 
McMillian, R.E. 
McMurtry, B.F. 
McWhorter, D.C. 
Meder, D.T. 
Miles, R.A. 
Miller, H.E. 
Mini, E.H. 
Mitchell, D.H. 
Moia, A.C. 
Montgomery, R.T. 
Morris, R.A. 
Mullen, R.W. 
Murray, D.B. 
Murphy, S.J. 
Myers, CL. 
Nail, J.M. 
Namtvedt, R.F. 
Neagle, J. A. 
Neyhart, C.J. 
Nicholas, C. 
Nicholas, R.B. 
Nims, R.D. 
Owen, CB. 
O'Connor, W.P. 
Okerlund, J.H. 
O'Leary, F.A. 
O'Neil, W.D. 



Reith, E.B. 
Royer, J.E. 
Reagan, K.B. 
Redfearn, J.I. 
Reich, L. 
Reinecke, W.F. 
Renn, J.B. 
Ricci, M.J. 
Richards, W.D. 
Richardson, H.B 
Ring, H.V. 
Robbins, R.A. 
Roberts, E.M. 
Rolen, J.M. 
Romoser, W.K. 
Rook, W.C. 
Rundle, J.R. 
Ryan, J.B. 
Ryan, R.B. 
Solomans, E.A. 
Simmel, F.W. 
Salchow, D.R. 
Sandusky, P.W. 
Schmidt, L.C 
Schneider, CR. 
Schultz, G.H. 
Seekely, R.A. 
Sekely, R.J. 
Semeyn, R.D. 
Seyller, E.W. 
Shapiro, B. 
Shinkwin, W. 
Signor, R.W. 
Silard, CD. 
Simonic, D.F. 
Simonton, J.E. 
Sims, G.S. 
Skinner, R.H. 
Smith, D.M 



Stone, R.L. 
Stowell, J.H. 
Stromberg, CG 
Sullivan, J.O. 
Surma, R.A. 
Suter, W.G. 
Sutton, H.C. 
Sykes, T.P. 
Tack, O.C 
Tallau, G.G. 
Taylor, H.B. 
Taylor, J.J. 
Taylor, R.L. 
Taylor, W.H. 
Terrell, R.B. 
Thomas, G.J. 
Thornton, R.A. 
Thress, W.F. 
Tinsley, T.M. 
Torbert, V.M. 
Tricca, C. f. 
Turner, J.M. 
Turvaville, L. J. 
Tyler, R.S. 
Tyler, R.W. 
Urie, J.L. 
VanAlen, W.L. 
Vedder, A.F. 
Vogt, G.L. 
Volker, D.L. 
Waddle, L.C. 
Williams, R.M. 
Waite, I.C 
Walden, J.M. 
Walker, H.C 
Walker, H.M. 
Weber, O.J. 
Webster, J.O. 
Whitman, A.E. 



Pikaart, L. 


Smith, J.E. 


Wilde, H.C. 




Page, D.M. 


Smith, P.L. 


Wilkins, C.W. 




Panico, L. ]. 


Snyder, J.L. 


Williford, W.O. 




Payne, C.F. 


Sorensen, N.M. 


Wolfe, R.B. 




Perry, E.L. 


South, R.P. 


Woods, B.D. 




Phelps, W.D. 


Spees, S.T. 


Woods, f.H. 




Phillips, F.L. 


Spencer, A.G. 


Worrell, E.W. 




Phillips, R.M 


Standley, W.H. 


Wrasse, W.A. 




Pinsky, H.M. 


Stansfield, J.E. 


Wright, C.W. 




Popham, J.K. 


Stebbins, F.A. 


Wright, E.A. 




Powers, J.E. 


Stephens, R.F. 


Yuill, S. I. 




Poyck, W.R. 


Stephenson, J.W. 


Zban, J. 




Pryor, L.S. 


Sternberg, H.W. 


Zgalich, E.J. 




Ritchie, S.L. 


Stevens, J.B. 












497 








j 



IN APPRECIATION 



In the initial stages of the production of the iQj6 Lucky Bag, we members of the 
staff were a green and inexperienced group. A few of us had obtained some experience 
on high school yearbook, starts, but we were hardly prepared to tackle a job the size of 
the Lucky Bag. For this reason a large amount of the credit for this Bag goes to the 
civilians who helped us along the way. We were long on ideas but short on time and 
knowledge. To those people who stepped in to make up the dillerence we give our deep 
and sincere thanks. 

Mr. William K. Sloane of Baker, Jones, I [ausauer, I nc. w as the printing representa- 
tive who provided us with the answers to the many questions that arose concerning the 
production of our honk. Hill's help in the planning stages and his sincere interest in the 
book throughout the production stage gave us the confidence we needed to put our 
utmost effort into the Bag. 

To our engraver, Mr. Walter C. Dargan, .uoes our thanks fur producing the ex- 
cellent plates needed for a quality book. Some ol the pictures we sent to Atlanta were 
not of the best quality hut Southern Photo Process Engraving Co. performed the mir- 
acles needed to obtain perfection in the engravings. 

The portraits in the biography section and the pictures in the underclass section 
are the excellent work ot Marvin Merin and his photographer, Harry Hollander. Marv 
a nil his stall worked long hours t< i give us the best in photography. While not a civilian, 
iMidn. Rex M Alister worked long hours in close co-operation with the photographers 
making up the schedules for the various pictures. 

In considering credits to photographers, we cannot neglect to acknowledge the 
assistance of those professionals who provided the Bag with pictures unobtainable by 
the star! but necessary to complete the theme of the book. Mr. M. E. Warren and the 
Washington Post should be credited with many of the sports pictures. The Army rally 
pictures on page 60 are through the courtesy of Life magazine. Mr. Jack Engeman's 
work was especiallv helpful in the Four Years section. We give special thanks to him 
for the following pictures: pg. 45 — end of a perfect day, pg. 43 — mid stenciling gear, 
pg. 80 — bottom picture of HMS Victory, pg. 68 — Yellow Peril pictures, pg. 69, pg. 70 — 
three pictures on right hand side of page, pg. 72 — first and third pictures of the series, 
pg. 76 — the bridge picture, and all the pictures on page 78. 

To Mr. Bob Lovell we owe our sincere appreciation for his excellent artwork on 
the divider pages and on the opening pages of the book. 



49S 



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The 
1956 
CLASS 
RING 



by 



JOSTEN'S 



A Josten Miniature is 
the only miniature that 
will exactly match 
your Official ring in 
design and quality. 



INQUIRIES INVITED 

VERNON R. GATLEY 

BOX 472 
CULPEPER, VIRGINIA 



500 





Freedom's Bright New Sword. 






World peace and security depend on a strong America. As a nation 
dedicated uncompromisingly to the principles of democracy, America 
is an instrument of hope to oppressed peoples everywhere. 

Zealous defense of these principles demands the spirit of a modern day 
Crusader. . .an appropriate name for this newest Navy fighter to take its 
place on the U. S. Defense team. 

Designed and built by Chance Vought, the new Crusader is the world's 
fastest carrier-based fighter. It is a super-jet, built to perform to tomor- 
row's military aircraft standards. 

The Vought Crusader adds needed striking power to Your New Air 
Navy's roving carrier task forces, helping to keep the peace throughout 
the world ... a peace made more secure by the watchful might of a strong 
U. S. Navy. 



NAVAL AVIATORS CHALLENGE THE JET FRONTIER 
Write NAVCAD, Washington 25, D.C., or visit your nearest 
Naval Air Station for details on your Air Navy opportunities. 



C HA N C 




t>WMGMIT JMJZC7JZJ1T7T 



/NCOftPORATED ■ DALLAS, TEXAS 

DESIGNERS AND BUILDERS OF HIGH PERFORMANCE MILITARY AIRCRAFT SINCE 1917 



501 





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Wore Than Printer's Ink 
duce a "Lucky Bag". . ♦ 



It takes thoughtful planning for beauty of design and economy 

of production. It takes rigidity of purpose to stay within a given 
budget and flexibility to make changes in stride. It takes check and double 

check of all the loose ends that cannot be avoided. It takes thoughtful 
typography, careful proof reading, painstaking presswork and constant 
attention to all details. It takes complete follow through from the 

first rough dummy to the final book. It takes teamwork between 
printer and editorial staff 

This "Lucky Bag" is another reason why the BJH imprint appears 
in so many fine publications. 



BAKER, JONES, HAUSAUER, Inc 



45 CARROLL STREET 



BUFFALO 3, NEW YORK 



503 



Tools of a 
Craftsma 

Behind every fine 
yearbook are months of 
planning and labor. 



Behind every fine 
engraving are years of 
experience and crafts- 
manship. 

We are proud of this 
opportunity to use our 
skill in the production of 
the 1956 Lucky Bag. 





Qmeiw^ 



PHOTO PROCESS ENGRAVING COMPANY 

119 1/2 Luckie Street, NW , Atlanta, Georgia / WAInut 7567 

The South's Largest Producer of Quality Printing Plates for School and College Yearbooks 




504 



For Business . . ■ For Pleasure 
For a World of Service— 




■>j» 



YOU CAN COUNT ON AMERICAN EXPRESS 

Here are the world-wide, world-wise services offered by American 
Express . . . 342 offices in 36 nations always ready to serve you 
completely, expertly, whatever your needs for business or pleasure. 




TRAVELERS CHEQUES 

The best-known, most widely 
accepted cheques in the world! 
American Express Travelers 
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refund if lost or stolen. You can 
buy them at BANKS, Railway 
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TRAVEL SERVICES 

The trained and experienced 
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Headquarters: 65 Broadway, New York 6, N. Y. 



505 



PRIVATE EYE FOR THE U. S. NAVY 




Because of its maneuverability in shallow water, and 
its agility in finding secure hiding places, the X-l is a 
highly versatile addition to our Navy. 



FAIRCHILD ENGINE DIVISION DESIGNED 
AND BUILT AMERICA'S FIRST MODERN 
MIDGET SUBMERSIBLE FOR THE U. S. NAVY 



New tactical mobility is brought to many U.S. Navy operations by 
the Fairchild X-l, a revolutionary underwater weapons system for 
close-in reconnaissance of harbors and inlets. The X-l is the first of 
its kind ever produced in America, and the first naval vessel of any 
kind to be designed and constructed by a U.S. aircraft manufacturer. 

Fairchild designed and built the 25-ton, 50-foot X-l with an uncon- 
ventional underwater propulsion system, and with airplane-like con- 
trols. The new "pocket" sub has a four-man crew — operates quietly 
and stealthily, performing missions that large craft could never do. 

Once again. Fairchild design and engineering ingenuity has produced 
a vital new instrument of defense for our armed forces. 



.. -WHERE THE FUTURE IS MEASURED IN LIGMT-YEARS! 



FAIRCHILD 

ENGINE DIVISION • DEER PARK, L. I., N. Y. 
A Division of Fairchild Engine and Airplane Corporation 




506 




the new world of dynamics 

In man's hands lies the control of the atom . . . unbelievable 
power to shape the future of the world. 

Five operating divisions and a subsidiary are developing and 
producing nuclear powered submarines and aircraft: 
supersonic fighters and bombers; commercial air transports; 
atomic research; medical and power reactors; telephonic, 
radio, radar, television, and electronic equipment; 
electric motors and guided and ballistic missiles. 

Thus. General Dynamics, through a dynamic systems concept, 
is creating a posture of leadership in the atomic age. 



GO 



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4 4 5 PARK AVENUE, NEW YORK 2 2, N.Y 



507 




THE FORTUNES OF PEACE 



America's first successful long-range pilotless 
bomber — the TM-61 Martin Matador — is a major 
weapons system conceived and developed in peace- 
time. And it is helping to keep the peace in an im- 
portant way. 

For the Matador is in quantity production, and 
already widely deployed. As the first aircraft having 
complete interchangeability of parts, it is transport- 
able by air and can be delivered unassembled for 
stockpiling in critical outpost areas. 

The new engineering concept that produced the 



Matador has already revised many design and pro- 
duction standards in the aircraft industry. For this 
versatile weapons system is being produced at the 
lowest cost-per-pound for comparable production, de- 
spite performance requirements more severe than 
those for most piloted aircraft. 

Today, the new Martin engineering concept is re- 
vising the calendar on some of the most advanced 
flight and weapons systems projects now in the re- 
search and development stages. 

These are among the Fortunes of Peace ! 



rs^i 



/=? 




Bold vision, 
bright future. 

In 67 free nations, spanning half the globe, 
Caltex supplies fine fuels and lubricants to 
industry, transportation, agriculture and to 
motoring millions. Caltex continues to invest 
its funds, skills and resources in such nations 
as these, for it is only the bold vision 
of today that sees the bright picture 
of tomorrow. 

PARTNER IN PROGRESS 
IN 67 LANDS 



PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Serving Europe • Africa • Asia • Australia • New Zealand 




509 




itilfieTafkof 

the Test drivers! 








THE FABULOUS '56 PONTIAC WITH A BIG AND VITAL GENERAL MOTORS "AUTOMOTIVE FIRST"! 



"® 



Believe us— it isn't easy to impress a test driver! 

But they're cheering Pontiac in a big way. 

What's set them buzzing is that big and vita] 
General Motors "First" combining: 

Pontiac s new big-bore Strato-Streak 1-8 with 
the terrific thrust of 227 horsepower. 

General Motors' new Strato-Flight Hydra* 
Marie* that gentles this mighty "go" to smooth- 
ness beyond belief. 

You don't need a test track to prove that here 
is the lift of a lifetime. 

Traffic tells you. Here's "stop-and-go" response 
as fast as thought itself. A hill helps. High or 
low. it's left behind without a sign of effort. And 
passing definitely pins it down. Gun it and in- 

PONTIAC MOTOR DIVISION "I GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATION 



stant, flashing power -weeps you swiftly by the 
loitering ear ahead. No drag, no lag— just safe 
and certain "go"! 

There's plenty more to charm you. The safety 
of big new brakes, a steady ride, advanced con- 
trols. Glamorous new beauty. 

But, above all, it's that fabulous new "go" 
that gets you! 

Drive a Pontiac today for a glorious double 
thrill. There'll be pride in vour heart, a torrent 
at your toe-tip. \^ hat more could anyone want? 

m An extra colt option. 



'56 



rOMTIAC 



510 




-ready for action I 




ONE OF THE most potent defense 
weapons now in use by our Navy 
is a supersonic, rocket-propelled, 
guided -missile called the "Terrier". 
Well named, the job of this electroni- 
cally-controlled "watchdog" is to 
track down an enemy and put him out 
of action before he can strike. 

Working in close cooperation with 
the Armed Services on this guided- 
missile, Philco research, engineering 
and production have made important 
contributions to its development. This 
has been particularly ttue in connec- 
tion with the proximity fuse, the 
mechanism which extends the effective 
target range and enables the "Terrier" 
to demolish an aircraft the moment it 
gets in the vicinity of the marauder. 

From the first sketch to the final, 
super-accurate mechanism, Philco pio- 
neered and completed this assignment 
in cooperation with the Navy. Philco's 
world famous scientific knowledge and 
skill is a continuing factor in the de- 
velopment of tomorrow's defense for 
your protection . . . tomorrow's quality 
products for better peacetime living 
throughout the world. 



PHILCO 



U.S.S. Boston, the Navy's 
first guided-missile ship 
with its "Terriers" ready 
for action, as it was com- 
missioned at the Philadel- 
phia Navy Yard. 



CORPORATION 




511 



with 4-door 
hardtops 

in all five 



This NEWEST and most popular of motor 
fashions is now offered by General 
Motors in '56 cars of every price class. 
And their dashing beauty is matched by 
equally thrilling advances in high- 
compression power in all five— coupled 
with even smoother, still more responsive 
Powerglide, Hydra-Matic and Dynaflow 
automatic drives. Plus extra-safety 
improvements like Power Brakes, Power 
Steering. Unisteel Bodies with double- 
locking door latches, safety-aim head- 
lights and seat belts (optional) on every 
GM car. So in 1956, more than ever, 
your key to greater value is the key to 
a GM car. 

CHEVROLET • PONTIAC • OLDSMOBILE 

BUICK • CADILLAC 

All with Body by Fisher • CMC TRUCK & COACH 



General 
Motors 



leads the way 




1956 Chevrolet Bel Air 4-Door Sports Sedan 



-\ 



— - 1 l% 




1956 Pontiac Star Chief 4-Door Catalina 



: ^ = ^~T> 





<p 



1956 Oldsmobile Ninety-Eight DeLuxe Holiday Sedan 







1956 Buick Roadmaster 4-Door Riviera 




1956 Cadillac Sedan de Ville 



512 



Midshipmen 



■ ■ 



Here's 
the Word! 




Here is the word, the last word on developments 
and happenings of interest to Naval officers. The UNITED 
STATES NAVAL INSTITUTE is your authoritative 
source of information on the Navy. Through the 

Institute's monthly publication, UNITED STATES 
NAVAL INSTITUTE PROCEEDINGS, you can keep 
abreast of the maritime picture. The PROCEEDINGS 
carries the world between its covers. Institute members 
and PROCEEDINGS contributors span the seven 
seas and all of the lands bounded by those seas. 
Every major advance in the maritime picture is 
factually and interestingly reported in the 
UNITED STATES NAVAL 
INSTITUTE PROCEEDINGS. 



famsgtmy about the United States Naval Institute 
and thejSn&wa States Naval Institute's Proceedings: 



• Fleet Admiral Ernest J. King: 

"I have been a member of the U. S. Naval Insti- 
tute for almost fifty years. I would urge all hands 
of the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard to 
become members in order to keep in touch with the 
progress in any part of sea power." 

• Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz: 

"In my own midshipman days it was the custom 



for the entire graduating class to become members 
of the Naval Institute before graduation. It is an 
excellent introduction to commissioned service 
which I hope is still pursued by the graduates of 
the Naval Academy." 

• Fleet Admiral William F. Halsey, Jr.: 

"The need for every naval officer to be a well- 
informed man is a vital one. There is no better 
way to achieve this than via some such medium as 
the Naval Institute and the Naval Institute 
Proceedings." 



As a midshipman, you are eligible, along with all other regular Navy, Marine Corps 
and Coast Guard officers, to become a regular member of the United States Naval 
Institute. Annual dues are $3.00. These dues include a full year's subscription 
to the UNITED STATES NAVAL INSTITUTE PROCEEDINGS and the privilege of 
purchasing institute-published books at substantial savings. 

To obtain complete details of these and other benefits of membership, address: 

United States Naval Institute, Annapolis, Maryland 



513 



# 



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ft 




Well 


Done! 


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ft 



ft 



America's Oldest and Foremost Makers of Uniforms . . . Since 1824 



514 



CLASS OF '56 



<* ft 



ft 



ft 



ft 



ft 



Suppliers of Fine Uniforms to Military Schools and Colleges 




515 



MARINE RAILWAY CHAIN 



CARGO LINES • FIRE MAINS • DECK 

FLUSHING LINES • PLUMBING DRAINS 

FUEL OIL PIPING • FRESH WATER LINES 




Here's why 

Wrought Iron is 

more than a match for CORROSION 

The photomicrograph at the left shows how a 
minute piece of wrought iron looks when it is 
magnified a great many times. This magnifica- 
tion reveals the unique composition of wrought 
iron, which is responsible for its ability to resist 
corrosion. Note the tiny fibers that are threaded 
through the body of the high-purity iron. These 
fibers are glass-like silicate, and there are as 
many as 250,000 of them in each square inch 
of wrought iron section. 
These fibers serve as mechanical barriers when corrosion strikes, 
and because they are not affected by corrosion, they halt and detour 
the attack. This "defense in depth" discourages pitting and rapid 
penetration, and keeps wrought iron on the job longer, at lower 
cost per year. 

These fibers help in other important ways, too. They anchor 
the initial protective scale, which shields the underlying metal 
just as a scab protects a wound. They benefit welding because 
they provide their own flux in electric arc, acetylene torch, and 
forge fire methods. And they give wrought iron special resist- 
ance to fatigue and vibration because of their fibrous qualities. 
As you can see, no other metal duplicates the nature and 
composition of wrought iron ... so, no other metal duplicates 
the resulting service advantages. Write for our bulletin, Wrought 
Iron for Marine Applications. 



HEATING COILS 







dtiL 



S 1 .*"** 



A. M. Byers Co. 



Clark Building • Pittsburgh 22, Pa. 



BYERS 




- '-Si »r 



INNER STACKS 



BILGE LINES 
BALLAST LINES 
SANITARY LINES 
EXHAUST PIPING 



CORROSION COSTS YOU MORE THAN WROUGHT IRON 

WROUGHT IRON 

TUBULAR AND HOT ROLLED PRODUCTS 

ELECTRIC FURNACE QUALITY STEEL PRODUCTS 



516 




517 



"For Want 

of a 

Nail . . . 



99 




For icant of a nail the shoe is lost, 
for uant of a shoe the horse is lost, 
for Hunt of a horse the rider is lost. 

George Herbert's statement applies to 

electronics today a- it ilicl to riders three 

centuries ago. The point ina\ be illustrated 
li\ considering a vital electronic unit 
made up of thousands of components. II 

the least of tin :omponents lail>. the 

whole unit may fail — and with ii i strate- 
gic military mission. 

The problem of reliability is becoming 
increasing!) important as the science ol 
electronics advances. "Black boxes" are 
li.n'd pressed t" perform more complicated 
tasks with increasing efficiency. \ml at 
the same time, the requirements call lor 
smaller dimensions. Notwithstanding en- 
\ in. omental extremes ol an order hitherto 
unknown, ever) resistor, capacitor and 
relaj must perform reliably. Each "nail" 
i- critical. 



That i- win H('\ i- continuing il- vigor- 
ous -'-arch lor ways and mean- to increase 
the reliability of every component in an 
electronic unit. This program never ceases. 
It follows through from design to field 
evaluation. Everything learned is imme- 
diately applied to current development 
and production. 

In seeking a degree of electronic perfec- 
tion never before attained, RCA joins 
hand- with other- in this field. This matter 
of reliability is an industry challenge to 
be met by ingenuitv. brain power and engi- 
neering knowledge wherever it i- lound. 




DEFENSE ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS 

RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 

CAMDEN, N. J. 



518 



jo million times a day 
at home, 
at work or 
on the way 



There's 
nothing 



like a 




1. SO BRIGHT IN TASTE . . . nothing like it for sparkling, tangy goodness. 

2. SO QUICKLY REFRESHING . . . nothing like it for a bracing 
bit of energy to bring you back refreshed. 



•coke" is a registered trade-mark 



COPYRIGHT 1955, THE COCA-COLA COMPANY 



519 




Satisfy Yourself "with a Milder, Better-Tasting smoke- 
packed for more pleasure by exclusive Accu-Ray 




The more perfectly packed To the touch ... to the 

your cigarette, the more taste, an Accu-Ray Chester- 

pleasure it gives ... and Accu- field satisfies the most... 

Ray packs Chesterfield far burns more evenly, smokes 

more jjerfectly. much smoother. 



Firm and pleasing to the 
lips . . . mild yet deeply satis- 
fying to the taste — Chester- 
field alone is pleasure-packed 
by Accu-Ray. 






KING SIZE & REGULAR 



CHESTERFIELD 



© Liggett & Mvzxs Tobacco Co. 



MILD, YET , 

THEY ^dttd^ff 



520 






BIG LOAD * BIG LIFT 

BIG PERFORMANCE 

ARE BUILT INTO 

FAIRCHILD C-123 



Maximum load-carrying capacity and workhorse durability 
are just two of the many reasons why the Fairchild C-123 
Assault Transport is ideally suited to tough jobs in all combat 
airlift operations. 

Equipped with Fairchild J44 turbojets on each wing-tip, the 
C-123 is provided with a power package of 2,000 lbs. extra 
thrust to meet any critical take-off or flight requirement. 

In front line operations, on any terrain, under the most diffi- 
cult conditions, the Fairchild C-123 gives big load, big lift, 
and big performance where and when utility and logistics 
support is needed. 
A Division of Fairchild Engine and Airplane Corporation. 

FAIRCHILD 

AIRCRAFT DIVISION • HA6ERST0WN, MARYLAND 

. . .WHERE THE FUTURE IS MEASURED IN LIGHT-YEARS! 




Loading ramp is built in. Up to 
19,000 pounds of bulk cargo can be driven 
right into the fuselage, eliminating 
ground handling equipment. 



Aerojet-General, America's leader in rocket 
propulsion, salutes the Class of 1956. To these 
men . . . symbols of American strength, guard- 
ians of American safety . . . Aerojet pledges 
unswerving support. 



Solid- and Liquid-Propellent Rockets for Assisted Takeoff and In-Flight Thrust 
Augmentation of Piloted Aircraft * Solid- and Liquid-Propellant Boosters and 
Prime Powerplants for Missiles • AeroBRAKE Thrust Reversers (SNECMA) • 
Auxiliary Power Units and Gos Generators * Upper-Atmosphere Research 
Rockets * Underwater Propulsion Devices * Electronics and Guidance * Ord- 
nance Rockets * Explosive Ordnance, Warheads, and Armament * Flame 
Throwers • Propellents and Propellant Chemicals • Primary Batteries • Pres- 
sure Vessels * Architect-Engineer Services * Rocket Test Facilities 



W 
t 




ty/efr£e/i&a£ 



CORPORATION 




A Subsidiary of 
The General Tire & Rubber Company 

MORE POWER FOR AIR POWER 



azlsa, california 
Sacramento, California 



522 






• Barracks Ships • "Neosho" Class Navy Fleet Oilers • Auxiliaries • Seaplane Tenders (Aux. Boilers) • 
Motor Vessel (Aux. Boilers) • Truck Transports • Army Tugs • Navy Tugs • V3-S-AH2 Seagoing Tugs 

• Privately Built Tugs • Fen C-2 Ships • C2-S-E1 Ships • C3-S-A2 Ships 



• C4-S-A1 Cargo Ships • C-4 

• P2-S1-DN Cargo Ships • I 
"Porter" Class Destroyers • 
"Gleaves" Class Destroyers 

• "Forrest Sherman" Class D 
"Iowa" Class Battleships • " 

• "Atlanta" Class Cruisers 

• "Salem" Class Cruisers • 
"Belleau Wood" Class Aircn 
"Forrestal" Class Aircraft C< 

• Privately Built Tankers • S 




B&W Single-Pass, Header-Type Boiler 



AP-3 Victory Ships • AP-5 Victory Ships • Frigates 

• "Corbesier" Class Escort Vessels • Seaplane Tenders (Aux. Boilers) 

C-4-SB-1 Cargo Ships • C-4-SA-3 



C-4-SA-3 Cargo Ships • C4-S-l-a Cargo Ships 

DL Cargo Ships • P6-S4-DS • Ore Carriers • 

Destroyers • "Sampson" Class Destroyers • 

Escort Vessels • "Benson" Class Destroyers 

hips • "North Carolina" Class Battleships • 

" Class Cruisers • "Brooklyn" Class Cruisers 

Class Cruisers • "Worcester" Class Cruisers 

Carriers • "Essex" Class Aircraft Carriers • 

Carriers • "Midway" Class Aircraft Carriers • 

• T2-SE-A2 Tankers • T3-SE-A1 Tankers 

Canadian Icebreaker • AP-2 Victory Ships • 

EC-2 Liberty Ships • Ferryboats • C-l Ships 

V3-S-AH2 Seagoing Tugs • 

nes • 



P2-S1-DN Cargo Ships • C4-S-1- 

• P3-S2-DL Cargo Ships • P6-S4 

• "Porter" Class Destroyers • "I 

• "Fletcher" Class De stroyers • 

• "Mahan" Class Destroyers • "S 

Se 

C 

T 

t: 
"i 

Ci 



Cr 
"E 
"F 




YOU'LL FIND B&W MARINE BOILERS 

IN ALMOST EVERY TYPE OF SHIP 

YOU CAN NAME 

The standard of excellence set by B&W 
Marine Boilers in both naval and merchant 
vessels is a standard that has existed 
for more than three-quarters of a century. 



B&W Single-Uptake, 

Controlled. Superheat Boiler 

Tankers 

AP-3 Victory Ships • AP-5 Victor: 
• "Corbesier" Class Escort Vesse 



L 



BABCOCK 
* WILCOX 



ner 
Privately Built Tanker 




Water-Tube Marine Boilers • Superheaters • Refractories • Airheaters • Economizers 
Oil Burners • Carbon, Alloy and Stainless Seamless and Welded Tubing and Pipe • 
Welding Fittings and Flanges 



jorts 
;rs) • 
yers 
sssel 
ips • 
srs • 
ips • 
ips • 
tes • 
ips • 
31ass 
ship's 
^lass 
asers 
:rs • 
£-Al 
ips • 
Jhips 
>lane 



THE BABCOCK & WILCOX COMPANY, BOILER DIVISION 
161 East 42nd Street, New York 17, N. Y. 



Tenders (Aux. Boilers) • Motor \ 
Seagoing Tugs • Privately Built T 

• S4-S2-BB-3 • S4-SE2-BD1 • Canadian Icebreaker • AP-2 Victory Ships 
C3-S-A4 Ships • C4-S-A1 Cargo Ships • C-4-SB-1 Cargo Sh 
T-AK-269 Vehicle Cargo Ship • P2-S1-DN Cargo Ships • : 
T2-SE-A1 Tankers • "Porter" Class Destroyers • "Mahan' 
"Benham" Class Destroyers • "Gleaves" Class Destroyers 
stroyers • "Forrest Sherman" Class Destroyers • "Fletche 

T2-SE-A2 Tankers • "South Dakota" Class Battleships • 

• "Alaska" Class Cruisers • "Baltimore" Class Cruisers • 
"Cleveland" Class Cruisers • "Norfolk" Cruiser • "Salem 

• "Saipan" Class Aircraft Carriers • "Midway" Class Aircn 
"Yorktown" Class Aircraft Carriers • "Forrestal" Class A 

"Belleau Wood" Class Aircraft Carriers • "Essex" Class A 

• Ferryboats • C-l Ships • C-2 Ships • "Reuben James" Class Escort Vessels 




ips • 
«*-3«7 ssels 
AP-3 Victory Ships • 
C3-S-A2 Ships 
C2-S-E1 Ships 
Ore Carriers • 
son" Class De 
i • Navy Tugs • 
lips • C-l Ships 
Ferryboats • 
ts • Army Tugs 
Ships • Frigates 
Aircraft Carriers: 
Barracks Ships 
T3-SE-A1 Tankers 



523 



PROTECTION 



for the wheels that make 
the world go 'round ! 




For everything that runs, there is a correct 
Flying Red Horse Lubricant! 



rnHOUSANDS of years ago some obscure genius in- 
-*- vented the wheel. With it he made possible most 
of today's mechanical marvels — and at the same time 
created a need— Lubrication! 

This need has become so vital over the centuries 
that today transportation and industry could not 
function without lubricants and lubrication knowl- 
edge. The Socony Mobil Oil Company is a leader in 
this specialized field. 

For over 89 years Socony Mobil has met the 
lubrication requirements of pioneers in many fields. 



Aviation's Wright Brothers . . . early car makers . . . 
the inventor of the Diesel engine are only a few who 
have called on the Flying Red Horse for specialized 
lubricants. 

Today, new developments such as atomic power, 
jet engines and gas turbines pose new and complex 
lubrication problems. Socony Mobil Oil is proud that 
it's being called on to solve these problems and plans 
to continue to devote its facili- 
ties and products to keeping 
the wheels of the world moving. 



The Leader in Lubrication for nearly a Century! 

SOCONY MOBIL OIL CO., INC., and Affiliates: MAGNOLIA PETROLEUM CO., GENERAL PETROLEUM CORP 




524 




STETSON IS THE NAVY'S FAVORITE FOOTWEAR 

. . . as it has been for more than 60 years 



If vour Navy Exchange can't supply you — Stetson 
will ship shoes to any officer, anywhere, on an 
open account basis. Ask for them by number, as 
indicated below. 

The Stetson Shoe Co., inc., So. Weymouth 90, Muss. 



White Buckskin Dress Oxford §1206 
Black Calf §1202, Tan Calf §1241 




525 



"Ro'lwfwwk-&a4al (Wort 




COURT KING — Anti-slip soles give maximum traction. DECK N COURT — Special grooved soles are sure- 

Special molded arch support is slotted for extra flexi- footed on boats, grass or any courts. Firm Duo-Life 

bilitv. Firm Duo-Life counter and bind. counter and bind. 

CALL TOR KEPSi 




BOOSTER s - 

hard floors. 
Worn bv U 



-Thic 
fabri 
nited 



k cork and crepe soles "soft cushion" 
c uppers "breathe." So light it floats! 
States Olympic Committee. 



SURESHOT— They protect feet from shocks. Molded 
suction soles give sure footing on speedy dribbles, 
turns, starts. Loose-lined uppers. Team colors. 



rafieds 

7$eSJioesofCfampms 



» 





United States Rubber 



526 



thi 



is is 




. * 



Principal GPE Producing Companies' 



I— Kearfott Company, Inc.; Little Falls, New Jersey II— International Projector Corporation; Bloom- 
field, New Jersey III — Bludworth Marine; New York IV— General Precision Laboratory Incor- 
porated; Pleasantville, New York V— The Griscom-Russell Company; Massilon, Ohio VI — Link 
Aviation, Inc.; Binghamton, New York VII— Shand and Jurs Co.; Berkeley, California VI 1 1 — The 
Hertner Electric Company; Cleveland, Ohio IX— The Strong Electric Corporation; Toledo, Ohio 

X— J. E. McAuley Mfg. Co.; Chicago XI — Askania Regulator Company; Chicago Xll-Ampro 

Corporation; Chicago XIII — Librascope, Incorporated; Glendale, California 



ArAnc of ObmhIisii design, development, manufacture and sale of highly advanced technological equipment and systems 

"' *" *»!*«*«*«««■ for the Armed Services and industry. 





• 


























Precision Mechanics, Optical Devices. Ceramics 




• 


















'V 








Electrical Equipment and Components 






?': 


• 






,!!, 




» 












Electronics 






■'. 






• 




<». 














Hydraulics, Liquids Processing, Heat Exchange 




m 






#> 














3 






Television: Studio, Theatre. Business. Institutional, Industrial 


Capacities 


& 












, 




it 










Instruments. Servos, Controls: Hydraulic, Pneumatic, Magnetic, Electronic 












f. 




'. 












Aircraft and Missile Guidance. Control, Simulation 




# 










'■* 










Q 






Automatic Computers and Components 




• 










» 
















Radar, Microwave, Ultrasonics 






--- 













. 


\ 


< 








Motion Picture and Audio Equipment 




■ 




1 


















Nuclear Power Components and Controls 














• 


z 












Systems Engineering: Aeronautical, Naval, Industrial 


* 


i 


II 


Ill 


IV 


V 


VI 


VII 


VIII 


IX 


X 


XI 


XII 


XIII 





Basic Operating Policy 

Personnel 

Sales 



Coordinated Precision Technology, inter-relating the skills and resources of all the companies in the 
GPE Group. 

12,000, of which over 2,500 are scientists, engineers and technicians. 
At tne rate of $150,000,000 



For brochure describing the work of the various GPE Companies, write: GENERAL PRECISION EQUIPMENT CORPORATION 

92 Gold Street, New York 38, New York 



527 



D 



efense is 
our business . . . 



From earliest cannon-carrying fighters to the 
most advanced guided missile weapons systems, 
Bell Aircraft has pioneered for 20 years in the 
design and production of new armament for our 
nation's security. 

In guided missiles, Bell is prime contractor 
for the strategic, long-range GAM-63 Rascal 
and supports the missile efforts of other manu- 
facturers. Also, in rocket engines, Bell builds 
engines for its own Rascal and for Nike mis- 
siles and other projects. 

The famous Bell series of high performance 
research aircraft — the X-l, X-lA, X-lB, X-2, 
and X-5 — is supplying today's information for 
tomorrow's tactical planes. The revolutionary 
XV-3 convertiplane and Bell jet-powered VTOL 
(vertical takeoff or landing) promise to change 
the entire concept of military aviation, launch- 
ing an entirely new era of flight. 

In hot war, cold war or peace. Bell Aircraft's 
engineers, skilled factor)- workers and modern 
facilities work progressively toward protecting 
our American way of life. National Defense 
has always been, is now and will continue to 
be our business. 




W> £ 




GUIDED MISSIL 



MILITARY and 
COMMERCIAL HELICOPTERS 



Q/7Pr&raft CORP. 

BUFFALO, N.V. FORT WORTH, TEXAS 




OCKET ENGINES 



. CARRIER LANDING SYSTEM -~ 



528 




.~-.J_._^j» 




1916 SPERRY AERIAL TORPEDO," FORE- 
RUNNER OF TODAY'S GUIDED MISSILES. 



40 years of Building Significant 

MISSILE CAPABILITY 



What makes a modern missile a success? Much more than was 
required when Sperry produced the first guided missile in 1916. 
Since that time, Sperry scientists have specialized in all of the 
arts required for the missiles of today — and tomorrow. But 
capability to produce missiles goes beyond arts and techniques. 

Capability means sufficient engineering manpower, adequately 
complemented by special support groups. It means experience 
in weapons systems' management and the ability to set up 
special facilities, men and machines, for large-scale research, 
development and production. 

Sperry is currently putting its capabilities to work in six major 
missile systems — of all types — ranging from complete systems' 
cognizance to major sub-system responsibility. 

There is a dynamic quality to Sperry capability which equips us 
to meet the weapons systems' challenges of the future. 




GVROSCOPF COMPMr 

Great Neck. New York 
DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 

CLEVELAND • NEW ORLEANS • BROOKLYN 
LOS ANGELES - SAN FRANCISCO • SEATTLE 
IN CANADA: SPERRY GYROSCOPE COMPANY 
OF CANADA, LIMITED, MONTREAL, QUEBEC 



529 




Who says driving in traffic has to be a headache! 
Just you try it in a new Chevrolet. 



This frisky, footsure beauty really 
takes the pressure off the five o'clock 
rush. You're calm and confident at 
the wheel because you know you're 
driving a car with cat-quick reflexes 
... a car that turns wishes into 
action! 

Have to hustle to match a change 
in the traffic pace? Just give Chevy's 
record-breaking V8 the word— and 
you more! Power now ranges up to 
205 h.p. Is this where you turn? 
Nothing to it. This new Chevrolet 



steers like it knows the way home. 
Red light ahead? Ease down on the 
brake pedal and you feel the silk- 
and-steel grip of Chevrolet's outsize 
brakes cushion you to a heads-up stop. 
You seem to sift through traffic 
tangles and scoot away from trouble 
spots. And you enjoy an utter sure- 
ness of control that makes all driv- 
ing safer and more fun. Ask your 
Chevrolet dealer to let you try this on 
your traffic! . . . Chevrolet Division of 
General Motors, Detroit 2, Michigan. 



THE HOT ONES 
EVEN HOTTER 



CHEVROLET 




530 




What do both have in common? 



The press gave unreserved attention to Newport 
News Hull Number 506 . . . the mighty 1039-foot air- 
craft carrier Forrestal . . . world's greatest fighting ship 
and forerunner of a new class of fighting ladies for 
the U. S. Navy. 

But take a look at Newport News Hull Number 
One, built in 1890. 

Originally christened the Dorothy, this hull is 
now the J. Alvah Clark. And, today, 65 years after 
Newport News built it, Hull Number One is still in 



Engineers • . ■ Desirable positions available at Newport 
News for Designers and Kngineers in many categories. 
Address inquiries to Hmployment Manager. 



operation . . . serving regularly in the fleet of the 
Curtis Bay Towing Co. 

You could place 145 vessels the size of the /. Alvah 
Clark on the flight deck of the Forrestal. 

Yet both Hull Number One and Hull Number 506 
have one characteristic in common: the quality 
built into every vessel ever constructed at Newport 
News. In fulfillment of the pledge of the founder that 
. . ."we shall build good ships." 



Newport News 

Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company 
Newport News, Virginia 



531 



ftar 

fore 



i± and 
os»t in 




V/orld speed and attitude record holder for 
single stage rockets . . . RMI rocket powered 
Martin Viking high altitude research rocket. 



• Missile boosters and sustainers 

• Aircraft powerplants 

• Ordnance rocket propulsion 

• Special propulsion devices 

• Launching and ejection devices 

• Auxiliary power units 

• Boundary layer control 

Another first in rocket engine design and m 
performance . . . Sikorsky HRS-2 helicopter 
equipped with RMI Rotor Rocket auxiliary power. 




I World speed and altitude record holder for piloted, 
aircraft . . . RMI rocket powered Bell Xl-A. 



Like the high altitude missiles its rocket 
engines have powered, Reaction Motors, Inc. 
has covered a great distance in a short time. 
As America's pioneer rocket engine producer, 
RMI gave this country its first practical liquid- 
propellant rocket powerplants and has 
engineered many barrier-breaking "firsts" in 
helping to keep our country strong. 




£jf/v#a&A^dts?4r II SrW^t-wM /nv&ft&A QfteteawcA 



f-TlV r r 




REACTION MOTORS, INC. 

Denville, New Jersey 
Affiliated with OLIN MATHIESON CHEMICAL CORP. 



;32 



NORTH AMERICAN HAS BUILT MORE AIRPLANES THAN ANY OTHER COMPANY IN THE WORLD 




Engineers: North American offers unusual opportunities. Write Engineering Personnel Office, Los Angeles or Downey, California; or Columbus, Ohio. 



FURYS FLY FROM USS FORRESTAL 




Biggest ship ever built, the Navy's new atom- 
age carrier . . . the USS Forrestal combines size 
and speed to give our Naval Air Arm unprec- 
edented striking power. A veritable floating 
city, the Forrestal is designed to operate any 
Navy plane now flying or on engineer's draw- 
ing boards . . . can "shoot" planes into the air 
from 4 new-type steam catapults. 

North American FJ-3 Fury Jets, one of the 
Navy's most advanced fighter types, will fly 
from the Forrestal. Capable of speeds over 650 



mph, and armed with 20mm cannons, the Fury 
will help make the USS Forrestal the most 
potent fighting ship on the high seas. 

Constant research and development keep 
North American foremost in aircraft, rocket en- 
gines, guided missiles, electronics and peace- 
ful applications of atomic energy. 



Young Men: The Navy offers you adventure and 
advancement. Contact your Recruiting Officer or write 
Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, D. C. 



ENGINEERING AHEAD FOR A BETTER TOMORROW 

Sorth American Aviation, inc. 



533 



Whatever your motoring wishes — 
you'll find them in one of 

The Ford Family of Fine Cars 

Variety is the spice of life — and that's the way people like 

their cars. Every year they desire new and different styles, models 

and colors. Ford knows this— and builds its cars accordingly. 







THE FORD 

• —for years the leader in advanced V-8 
power, distinctive styling and outstanding 
value. The one fine car in its price field. 



THE THUNDERBIRD 

—makes you want to go places. Sleek, low- 
silhouette styling . . . controlled V-8 power . . . 
a personal car of great distinction. 





THE BIG M MERCURY 

— firmly rules the medium-price class 
with distinctive beauty, power, and 
superb handling and riding qualities. 



THE LINCOLN 

— preferred for fine car luxury. • 
A picture of easy-going graceful- 
ness with good highway manners 
and engineering excellence. 





THE CONTINENTAL 
MARK // 

—the very finest of all fine cars— in 
every respect. Its quiet elegance 
and precision engineering are for 
the most discriminating motorist. 



FORD MOTOR COMPANY 

FORD . THUNDERBIRD • MERCURY • LINCOLN . CONTINENTAL MARK // 
FORD TRUCKS -TRACTORS • FARM IMPLEMENTS • INDUSTRIAL ENGINES 



534 



Q 



ur 



K^onqratulationS ana (jSest Wishes 



'7 



to the 

Class of 1956 

M ERIN 

STUDIOS OF PHOTOGRAPHY 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 

TO THE 

1947-1948A 

1950-1951-1952-1953 

1954-1955 and 1956 

LUCKY BAG 



All Portraits of First Classmen appearing in these Publications have been 

placed on file in Our Studio and can be Duplicated 

at Any Time for Personal Use. 



Write or Call Us for Further Information 

Walnut 3-0146-0147 

1010 Chestnut Street Philadelphia 7, Penna. 



535 



Photo Courtesy U.S. Navy 




BREEZE 



PACIFIC BOILER FEED PUMPS DELIVER 

No matter what the glass pressure, you can be sure of your feed 
pressures with Pacific Boiler Feed Pumps. The following is an 
excerpt from a letter recently received at our office : 

". . . Our Pacific Feed Pumps have been in operation nearly 
10 years without an overhaul. When inspected, there was 
no sign of casing erosion-corrosion or impeller wear. Parts 
replaced because of wear consisted of balancing device, 
wearing rings and shaft sleeves. We installed new sleeve 
bearings and Kingsbury shoes to make sure of a good job.'.'.* 

To apply this assurance of trouble-free operation to your pump 
needs, contact our nearest representative or write directly to : 

*Stime on requtlt. 



PACIFIC PUMPS inc. 

One of the Dresser Industries 

HUNTINGTON PARK, CALIFORNIA 

Export Office: Chanin Bldg., 122 E. 42nd St., New York 

Offices in all Principal Cities 



U-10 



TYPES: TA & TB 




with Pacific — 
"PUMPS ARE EVERYTHING" 

Fabricated from materials 
selected for: 

Mechanical strength 

Stability 

Resistance to erosion-corrosion 

Equipped with 

pressure-lubricated bearings 

Balanced dynamically — 
radially — axially 

Parts precision-finished 

Pump tested under 
contract conditions 

Unfailing service 




536 







ORDNANCE EXTRA ORDINARY! The Terrier, the Navy s 
new all-weather anti-aircraft missile, is now being produced in quantity by Convair in the Naval Industrial 
Reserve Ordnance Plant of the U.S. Navy's Bureau of Ordnance. Responsible for supplying our Navy 
with the most effective weapons, the Bureau of Ordnance participates in vast programs of 
research, development, testing, and procurement. The Bureau of Ordnance facility at Pomona, California, 
managed and operated by Convair, is an outstanding example of government and industry 
working together to produce weapons systems for the defense of our country. 

CONVAIR 

A DIVISION OF GENERAL DYNAMICS CORPORATION . 



537 







PROGRESS NEEDS PROTECTION 




538 




mm 



The mighty Forrestal can protect a center of progress like New York City while 
oceans away. The threat of retaliation from this swift, roving airbase is another 
powerful deterrent to any country's thought of aggression. For the deck of this 
super-carrier can launch a hundred jets to strike with sudden devastation. The 
Forrestal is, with the atomic submarine, an example of U. S. Naval progress in 
protection. So, too, are the Grumman Cougars on the Forrestal flight deck. 
Cougars, like all Grumman airplanes, were ready in quantity when needed 



GRUMMAN AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING CORPORATION 

Bethpage • Long Island • New York 

Designers and builders of supersonic Tiger, transonic Cougar, S2F sub-killer. 
Albatross SA-16 rescue amphibian, metal boats, and Aerobilt truck bodies. 

Make your career in Naval Aviation. Write: Nov Cod, Washington, D.C 




539 



COSMO ENGINEERING LABORATORIES, INC. 

Designers and Builders of 

CUSTOM PRODUCTION MACHINERY and EQUIPMENT 

COSMO-TROL ADJUSTABLE SPEED CONTROLS and SEQUENCE MASTERS 

Telephone GArden 5-3959 • P. O. Box 348 • HACKETTSTOWN, NEW JERSEY 



\ui llici ii liiiliiiiiiii: hi! in iiuimIi'iI 



Division of 

NORTHERN PUMP COMPANY 



Hydraulic Machinery and Gun Mounts 

MINNEAPOLIS. MINNESOTA 



GIBBS 6l COX, Inc. 



1 1 aval -y~rrcliiteciJ and fr/arine C-/i 

NEW YORK 



9 



ineerS 



540 



SAVANNAH MACHINE and FOUNDRY CO 

♦ 

Skip Building 

Skip Repairs and Conversions 

Structural Steel Fabrication 

Graving Dock 540' x 73' 

Marine Railway 1200 Ton 



P. O. BOX 590 



SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



TELEPHONE 3-6624 



BEST WISHE 



TO THE 



CLASS OF 1956 



Flanigan, Loveland Tanker Co., Inc. 



PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 



Operators of Ocean-Going Tankers 



Rear Admiral H. A. Flanigan, USN (Ret. 



S. C. Loveland, Jr. 



541 



Designers and Manufacturers of 



ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT 
For the United States Navy 



SANGAMO ELECTRIC COMPANY 

SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



iFULTON 



[TEMPERATURE 



\ 



V 



Temperature Regulators for . . . Heating and Venti- 
lating Systems . . . Hot Water Heaters . . . Diesel 
Engines . . . and other control purposes aboard ship. 
Packless Valves tor hazardous liquids, vacuum sys- 
tems, etc. 

Write jo r L he ra t u re 

CONTROLS COMPANY 

FULTON SYLPHON DIVISION 

P. O. BOX 400 
KNOXVILLE 1, TENN., U. S. A. 



Verson 

LEADING THE WAY... 

to more goods for more people 

at lower cost through mass production 



\\ I-. .it Verson, are proud of our position <>f leadership 
in the development of more rflirient marhiurs for mass pro- 
duction "f formed mt'tal prorlurls. (M^antir step* forward 
have been made in recent wars toward our ^oa! of full) 
automatic, high Bpeed forming of metal with a minimum of 
handling and now we are extending these methods to an ever- 
increasing \ariel\ of jolt-. 

\\ i- would welcome the opportunit) to discuss ( 1 1 « - possi- 
bilities of high speed, automatic production with anyone 
concerned with mass production ami point out how unit 
costs can be reduced. 

VERSON ALLSTEEL PRESS COMPANY 

9300 S. Kenwood Vve., Chicago 19, III. 
Phone REgenl \-KHW 

Holm.-- St. and Ledbetter Dr.. Dallas 8, Texas 

Phone llarwooil 1 1 77 

I I erson Press for Every Job from 60 Tons I p! 

Blanking Presses - Forging Presses - Drawing Presses 
Hydraulic Presses - Press Brakes - Dies - Die Cushions 



SPRRGUE 



ELECTRIC COMPANY 

North Adams, Massachusetts 




MANUFACTURERS OF ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS 



--\i 



WHITE MOUNT AIRY GRANITE 
Strong • Durable • Beautiful 

the NORTH CAROLINA GRANITE corporation 

Mount Airy, North Carolina 



^ss&t 




BUILDING 
MATERIALS 



> s 



The 

Flintkote Company 



ROOFING 



SIDING 



INSULATION 




Fuller Brushes 



HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT 



MURRAY HILL 6-4662 



STOCK CONSTRUCTION CORPORATION 



GRAND CENTRAL TERMINAL 



NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 



543 





KINGSBURY 





KINGSBURY MACHINE WORKS, INC. 

4324 Tackawanna Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



TO THE CLASS OF '56 

WELCOME SHIPMATES! 

We address vou thus because — ■ 

On nearly any vessel you join you will be 

Shipmates with 

KINGSBURY THRUST & JOURNAL BEARINGS 

They have been the Navy's choice 
since before World War I 



A 

ARUNDEL] 

/CORP0RATI0H\ 

BALTIHOtC 
MMYIAM 

DREDGING 
ENGINEERING CONSTRI (HON 

SAM) GRAVEL STONE 

COMMERCIAL SLAG 



The 
Arundel Corporation 

Baltimore 2, Maryland 

Brooklyn I. N. Y. Miami 6, I la 



Compliments of 



j. a J. CASH 



l\COI{l'(H{ Ml J) 



sol Til NORWALK, CONN. 

Makers of 

Cash's Woven Names and Numbers 

tor Marking Clothing and Linens 



We have enjoyed supplying 

CASH'S WOVEN NAMES AND NUMBERS 

to the Students of 

UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY 

for Many Years 




R-K SOLENOID TRIP VALVES 

Three-Way as shown for fresh Water Distilling Plants 
Other Types for Fuel Oil and Steam Service 

Ruggles Klingemann Mfg. Company 

Main Office and Works — Salem, Mass. 

Sales Office — 110 Tremont St. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



544 




'Quality" 



'Service" 



Maryland Hotel Supply Co. 
Inc. 

227 SOUTH HANOVER STREET 
BALTIMORE 1, MARYLAND 

LExington 9-7055 

MEATS— POULTRY 
DAIRY PRODUCTS 

BIRDS EYE 

FROSTED FOODS 

REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. 



Ruskin once wrote: 

"There is hardly anything in the 
world that some man cannot make 
a little ivorse and sell a little 
cheaper, and the people icho con- 
sider price only are this man's 
lawful prey." 



RUSSELL D. NILLER, JR. 

President 



'Uniformity" 



"Dependability" 




Ashore or Afloat 

FLORSHEIM 

Naval Officers' Shoes 

have earned the esteem of thousands who 
consider Quality the most important single 
ingredient of Service shoes. 



THE FLORSHEIM SHOE COMPANY o CHICAGO 

Makers of Fine Shoes for Men and Women 



Get a bootmaker shine 

with DRESS PARADE 

. . . 365 times a year 

No need to tell you the how and why of 
polishing shoes. So don't add a thing to your shoe 
care routine except Dress Parade Stain Boot 
Polish. You'll get the finest shine you've ever had 
in minutes. Dress Parade waxes as it polishes, 
contains a stain that puts an end to scuff marks. 
Whether you're on or off duty, Dress Parade keeps 
your shoes at their best. 

DRESS PARADE 

STAIN BOOT POLISH 

in black, brown, white and four other color 




545 




FOR THE FINEST IN 
SPORTS EQUIPMENT 



THE NAVY MUTUAL AID ASSOCIATION 

Navy Department 
Washington 25, D. C. 




Organized July 28, 1879 

Midshipmen Now Eligible Upon Receiving ('omtn: 
in I he Kesular Navy 

Protection in Force #100,000,000 

Assets 330,000,000 

Total Payments to Beneficiaries 

Since Organization Over £22,500,000 

SERVING THE NEEDS OF 

\ WV. \1 \RI\E CORPS AND COAST GUARD 

OFFICERS VND THHIR DKPKNDKXTS FOR 

I HREE-QUARTERS OF A CENTURY 




HE 






GEE, I WISH 1 HAD BOUGHT MY OUTFIT FROM 
JOE GREENFIELD AT PEERLESS' LIKE THE OTHER 
FELLOWS DID 



DIDN'T 
KNOW 



JOE 






■ — — — o 



546 



I 



THE AMERICAN SOCIETY 
of NAVAL ENGINEERS, Inc. 

ESTABLISHED 1888 

A bonafide non-profit organization 
for the advancement of Engineer- 
ing, Conducted by Naval officers. 

Much of a Naval officer's career is Engineering. A vital factor 
for maximum efficiency in this most important work is familiarity 
with the state of the Art. Membership in this Society will be of 
great help in keeping abreast of Engineering at all times. 

Annual dues 87.50. No initiation fee. No additional charge to 
members for quarterly Journal, a recognized authority in Engi- 
neering. 

NOW AVAILABLE FOR MIDSHIPMEN— A Junior Member- 
ship at one half the regular dues, effective for one year after 
graduation. 

Send application to Secretary-Treasurer 

THE AMERICAN SOCIETY of NAVAL 
ENGINEERS, Inc. 

Rm. 1004, 1012 14th St., N.W., 
Washington 5, D. C. 



Marine Auxiliaries 

America' s Standard for 90 Years 




Steering Gears — Windlasses — Winches 

Capstans — Hydrapilots 
Hele-Shaw and Hydramite Fluid Power 

Write for Descriptive Literature 

AMERICAN ENGINEERING CO. 

Philadelphia 25, Pa. 

BAWDEN INDUSTRIES, LTD. 
Toronto 3, Canada 

AFFILIATED ENGINEERING CORPS. LTD. 
Montreal 2, Canada 

All subsidiaries of 

UNITED INDUSTRIAL CORPORATION 

Grand Rapids, Michigan 





GUIDED MISSILES 



ELECTRONICS RESEARCH 



In the center oj 



Huffman 

LABORATORIES INC. 



4- 



ELECTRONIC LEADER 



AIR FRAME 

> THE AIR-FRAME INDUSTRY 
• ELECTRONICS RESEARCH 

> GUIDED MISSILE DEVELOPMENT 

Hoffman Laboratories, Inc. is 
engaged in projects covering every 
phase of electronics . . . radar, 
sonar, guided missile controls, 
countermeasures, fire-control, 
noise reduction, communications, 
navigation equipment, and 
computers . . . for the military 
and private industry. 
Located in the center of the 
air-frame and missile industries 
of America, Hoffman gets things 
done ... on the spot where 
and when they're needed most. 

HOFFMAN LABORATORIES, INC. 

A SUBSIDIARY OF HOFFMAN ELECTRONICS CORPORATION 
3761 SOUTH HILL STREET, LOS ANGELES 7, CALIFORNIA 



547 



/ 



(fet t6e Sett t 



WEBSTER'S 

NEW COLLEGIATE 

DICTIONARY 



I.S. PA1J 

The result of more than one liumlre«l years 
of dictionary-making experience by the 
famous Merriam-Webster Editorial Staff. 

Backed by the experience of making five previous 

editions of Webster's Collegiate . . . Each proven 
to be the "best handy-size dictionary" of its time. 

1,196 Pages. 125,000 Entries 
2,300 Terms Illustrated. 

REG US PAT OFF. 

<;. & (.. V1ERR1 V\l COMPAN1 
Springfield 2. Mass. 




FIRST CLASS SHIPS 



FIRST CLASS SERVICE 



For over forty years Mooremack has been a name of 
consequence in the world of shipping . . . today, 
more than ever, on both the Atlantic and Pacific 
coasts of the United States and in South America, 
Scandinavia and Continental Europe, Moore- 
McCormack ships represent the newest, most mod- 
ern and most efficient in transportation. 

itFrom Pearl Ha'bor to V-J Day, Moore-McCormack huh. operated ntort 
than 15t els, transported 75i,S39 troops and earned J'.W'J Jl 

tone of war cargo. T<> d ibilitiesin time of crisis, America's 

Merchant Marim I " war 

MOORFMcCORMACK 

5 Broadway /////"J New York 4, N. Y. 

OFFICES IN PRINCIPAL CITIES OF THE WORLD 




me 



JL lease forward 
the amount due, after deducting 
the expenses . . ." 



/^i 




=^s o 



X December 4, 1865, Ri££S & Company received the fore^oin^ 
request from its lone-time customer DAVID G. FARRAGUT. 
For more tban a century tbe RIGOS ban ting tradition lias proudly 
served "tbe Navy" from Wasbington. Tbe oldest typewritten document 
in our files is a letter signed by tbe revered . . . GEORGE BANCROFT. 
At borne or abroad, we believe you will find it easier to advance your 
financial affairs by tbe use of tbe time-bonored "RIGG^ cbeck". 

The RIGGS NATIONAL BANK 

of WASHINGTON, D. C. • FOUNDED 1836 
LARGEST BANK IN THE NATION'S CAPITAL 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation • Member Federal Reserve System 



548 



SPENCE ENGINEERING COMPANY, Inc. 

Owners of Rider-Ericsson Engine Co., Founded by Capt. John Ericsson, 1842 

Pressure and Temperature Regulators 
DESUPERHEATERS— STRAINERS 



WALDEN, NEW YORK 



WALDEN 2-4501 
GRANT ST. & N. Y. C. R. R. 



CABLE ADDRESS 
DELAMATER, NEW YORK 



McKIERNAN-TERRY 
CORPORATION 



MANUFACTURING ENGINEERS 



PLANTS 
HARRISON, N. J. - DOVER, N. J. 



BOSTON 



SALES OFFICES 

- NEW YORK — CHICAGO 



AIRCRAFT CATAPULTS 

ARRESTING GEAR ENGINES 

STEERING GEARS • TELEMOTORS 

ANCHOR WINDLASSES 

CAPSTANS • WINCHES 

PILE HAMMERS 
SPECIAL DEVELOPMENT 



ESTABLISHED 1863 



GENUINE 

NAVY INTERMEDIATE 
PILOT JACKET 



$32 



50 



Sizes 34 to 46 



*35 



oo 



Sizes AS &. 50 



Shipped Bootpald If remittance 
accompanies •rdw\ 




U.S.N. ISSUE 

Brand new. Genuine dark brown Goatskin leather. Bi-swing 
back, two patch pockets, one inside snap pocket, Mouton 
fur collar, Celanese lined. 100% wool cuffs and waist band. 

FINEST JACKET MADE 

State Size Wanted 

Distributors of tires, batteries, and aircraft 
parts and equipment. 

FLYING EQUIPMENT SALES CO. 

Dept. AN 
1639-45 W. WOLFRAM ST. CHICAGO 13. ILL. 



IB 
1 



DM 



METALLURGICAL 
PRODUCTS 




; REGISTERED 



SALT BATHS— INDUSTRIAL FURNACES 
SALT BATH CONVEYORS 



Detroit, Mich. 



14341 Schaefer Hwy. 
Detroit 27, Mich. 
Telephone: 

BRoadway 3-5405 



Three F.O.B. Points 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Write for Descriptive Literature 

4700 E. 48th Street 
Los Angeles 5S, Calif. 
Telephone: 
LUdlow 1-9153 



New Haven, Conn. 



P. O. Box 1S98 
New Haven 8, Conn. 
Telephone: 
STate 7-5885 



549 




iTloran has ihe specialized equipment and experience for every type of towing 
problem — harbor, inland water, coastwise or deep sea. Modern Diesel-Electric tugs 
are available to handle assignments anywhere in the world, 

MORAN 

TOWING & TRANSPORTATION 

17 BATTERY PLACE, M.W MtHK 1. N. V. 



FEEL THE DIFFERENCE! 




SINCLAIR 
POWER -X 

The New Super Fuel 




POWER UP POWER X 

Power-Primed with ROCKET FUEL 

Another first for Sinclair! From Sinclair Research comes a new super gasoline power-primed 
with ROCKET FUEL — the same mighty fuel used in V-2 rockets! Command rocket 
power at the touch of your toe . . . super getaway . . . high anti-knock . 
Power up with Power-X and feel the difference! In Power-X, 
you also get ANTI-STALLING, PRE-IGNITION 
CONTROL and ANTI-RUST PROTECTION. 



Ask \but- £ihc/aif Deafer -fbt 



1871 


Over SO Years of Manufacturing Experience 

CROSBY-ASHTON 

SAFETY AND RELIEF VALVES - - PRESSURE GAGES 
Approved and Used by U. S. 

CROSBY STEAM GAGE & VALVE COMPANY 

THE ASHTON VALVE CO. 

Wrentham, Massachusetts 


1956 


New York 


Dallas 


London 


Chicago 


Los Angeles 


Paris 



550 






County Trust Company 

of Maryland 

Resources Exceeding 
$65,000,000.00 



member: 

The Federal Reserve System 

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

and 

General Depository for 

The Treasurer of the United States 

APPRECIATIVE 
OF 

NAVY BUSINESS 

CHURCH CIRCLE & GLOUCESTER STREET 
ANNAPOLIS, MD. 




At the cross- 
roads of the 
world's smart- 
est shopping 
and entertain- 
ment center... 






FIFTH AVE. at 55* St., N.Y. 



Where Southern Hospitality 
Is A Reality 

EMERSON 
HOTEL 

It's just around the 
corner from everywhere 




Navy Headquarters 
in Baltimore 



A Meyer Hotel 



Otis G. Clements, Mgr. 



SULLIVAN SCHOOL 



Effective preparation for Annapolis, 
West Point, Coast Guard and Air 
Force Academies, and all Colleges 



WENDELL E. BAILEY, Grad. U.S.N.A., '34 
Principal 



Box B, 2107 Wyoming Avenue, N. W. 
WASHINGTON 8, D. C. 



SSI 



"We believe that peaceful co-existence is best maintained bx being too tough to tackle" 




MASON & HANGER-SILAS MASON CO INC. 




Engineers and Contractors 




BUILDERS and OPERATORS OF ORDNANCE FACILITIES 




500 Fifth Avenue 


Lexington 


New York 


Kentucky 



Compliments o 
AUDIO PRODUCTIONS, IIVC 

FILM CENTER BUILDING 
630 NINTH AVENUE 



New York 36, New Yark 



Telephone HINGHAM 6-2360 

MASSA LABORATORIES, Inc. 

5 FOTTLER ROAD 
HINGHAM. MASS. 

HYDROPHONES, UNDERWATER TRANSDUCERS. SOUND PRESSURE AND 
VIBRATION MEASUREMENT EQUIPMENT 



552 



^LRITT-CHAPMAN & SCOTT • MERRITT-CHAPMAN & SCp^ 



- 

- 



a. 
u 

s 

Ul 




Symbol of Service 
for 96 years 



The Black Horse insignia of Merritt-Chap- 
man & Scott has long been recognized as a 
symbol of proficiency in the fields of marine 
salvage, floating derrick operations, and 
construction of all types. Today, as for 96 
years, your confidence is justified where 
this flag flies. 



I 



N 



J 

■•-; 

. ■ 

: 
-I 

: ; 



Merritt-Chapman & Scott 



CORPORA 

Founded 1860 

260 Madison Avenue, New York 16, New York 

Cleveland, Ohio Chicago, 111. Washingto n, D. C. Birmingham, Ala. Houston, Tex. 

Norfolk, Va. Boston, Mass. Hartford, Conn. Key West, Fla. Kingston Ja. B.W.I. 

** RITT-CHAPM AN & SCOTT • MERRITT-CHAPMAN & SC& 



: 




om go on in flight! 



The four fierce horsemen that 
shake the skies — Thunder, Rain, 
Lightning and Hail — have met 
their match in Bendix* Airborne 
Radar. Planes equipped with this 
wonderful new device can now 
safely avoid the turbulence and 
damage storms often cause. Even 
at night, Bendix radar sees storms 
up to 150-miles range and projects 
a clear, detailed picture of their 
location, size and intensity on a 
scope in the cockpit so pilots can 
decide what to do — skirt the area 
or fly through it if the radar indi- 
cates a clear passageway. 

Airborne Radar is only one of 
many precision electronics prod- 
ucts developed and built by Bendix 
Radio. Others include aircraft 
communications and navigation 
systems . . . ground-to-air trans- 
mitters and receivers . . . plus 
many types of air defense radar. 



Bendix Radio Division • Bendix Aviation Corporation • Baltimore 4, Maryland 

Export Sole; and Service: Bendix International Division, 205 E. 42nd Street, New York 17, N. Y., U.S.A. 



Actual storm ahead as pilot 
sees it on radar scope. It 
indicates that, by changing 
course very slightly to the 
right, he will find o smooth, 
storm-free route. 



Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 




553 



//yS Croslev ^C\ 


/// Broadcasting \\\ 


f // Corporation \\\ 


///spencer \\\ 


[/ HEATER ilmmccut \\\ 

// KITCHENS \\ \ 


liiiiiili 


CROSLEY U 


ill 


New Jdea 

/ 1 


famous 


1 Lycoming // 


names 1\ «ndix I 


Gcnerol Offices- \\ fl ^" UjLWkW^K. 


New York 17, N. Y. \^\"~^ ^jT^ 



PARTNERS 
in 

DEFENSE 

Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory, Inc., is a self-sus- 
taining, not-for-profit affiliate of Cornell University 
dedicated to applied research in the aeronautical 
sciences. Through advanced research and develop- 
ment of guided missiles, aircraft and their compo- 
nents, the Laboratory assists the U. S. Army, U. S. 
Navy and U. S. Air Force in the vital task of defend- 
ing the nation. Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory, 
Inc., joins in wishing the 1956 graduating class of 
the United States Naval Academy the best of suc- 
cess and pledges the utmost cooperation in the 
difficult tasks ahead. 

CORNELL AERONAUTICAL LABORATORY, INC. 

OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY 

4455 GENESEE STREET, BUFFALO 22, N. Y. 




GOVERNMENT 


PRODUCTS 


DIVISION 




YOU CAN™ 


AON RHEEM 








RHEEM Manufacturing Com 


pany. . 


. Government 


Products Division 


Downey, Calif. • San Pablo, Calif. "Was 


hington 


D.C. • Philade 


Iph 


a, Pa. • Burlington, 


N.J. 



554 




SYLVANIA 



Supplying vita! components that a 
"heart" of hundreds of industrial, i 
and defense products— this is Sylv; 
"heart business." 

For lighting, television, electronics, radio 
and atomic energy, Sylvania makes the hearts 
. . . receiving tubes, lamps, TV picture tubes, 
electronic devices, photoflash bulbs, atomic 
fuels, chemical and metallurgical products, 
parts, and many others— all of them vital to 
a wide range of end products. 

That's why Sylvania has become the fastest 
growing name in the rapidly expanding 
electrical -electronics industry'- Sylvania has 
expanded into an organization of 45 plants 
and 16 laboratories in 11 states, with over 
25,000 employees. Much of this growth has 
come in the past few years. 

In the multibillion electrical -electronics 
industry, Sylvania today plays a vital part. 
But the company's 2,000 scientists and 
engineers are also building for the future! 
finding new and better ways of doing things 
—assuring constant progress in the years ahead. 

Sylvania Electric Products Inc. 
1740 Broadway. New York 19. N. Y. 
In Canada: Sytmnia Electric ^Canada) Lid.. 
University Tower Building, Montreal. 



LIGHTING 



ELECTRONICS 



T E LE V 1 S IO r- 



ATOMIC ENERGY 



Motorola Inc. 

Motorola research in military 
electronics is dedicated to the 
task of helping maintain the 
nation's superiority in wea- 
pons design. 

Radar 

Guided Missiles 

Two-way FM Radio 



Laboratories 

for military electronics research: 
Riverside, California 
Phoenix, Arizona 
Chicago, Illinois 



Proudly Serving 
the U.S. Navy... 



SINCE 1928 



SMITH way Port- 
able Submersible 
Damage Control 
Pump-A. O. Smith 
also makes motors 
for nearly every 
purpose, offering a 
wide range of types 
and sizes from V3 
H. P. to 500 H. P. 



Through research 




. . a better way 



A Small 



PACIFIC COAST WORKS 

5715 SMITHway STREET • EOS ANGELES 22, CALIFORNIA 



555 



^ytsttoS 




YOU CAN NOT 
OVERWIND 



?l«j Hdtf.e Powrr Cm(| 



Zodiac 



DOB 



OFFICIAL WATCH SWISS FEDERAL RAILWAYS 
Zodiac Watch Agency, S21 Fifth Avenue, New York 



AIM MM FlftS 



We now offer to the ANNAPOLIS grad- 
uates regulation swords with STAIN- 
LESS STEEL and CHROMIUM blades 
which we FIRST originated for the 
Marine Corps and which have proven 
very successful because of their long- 
wearing and rust-proof 5 features. 

NAVY SWORDS 

CONQUEROR— 'STAINLESS STEEL BLADE 
DEFENDER— 'CHROMIUM PLATED BLADE 
SPARTAN— NICKEL PLATED BLADE 

SWORD EQUIPMENT 




SWORD CASES 
SWORD COVERS 



SWORD BELTS 
SWORD KNOTS 




( 



n 



u. 



NEW YORK, N. Y. 

INSIGNIA SPECIALISTS • FOUNDED 1868 



To The Naval Academy Class uf 1956 

The twilight of your Academy days is at hand . . . the dawn of a new future looms ahead 
for each of you in the Class of 1956. That future holds in its timeless hands a grave re- 
sponsibility as well as a golden opportunity for service. We know that each of you will 
fulfill your tour of duty in the glorious tradition of the Navy. 



kjooci inch and Smooth Sallinal 



! 



H. E. KDDIVTZ CREAMERY, IIYC. 

5600 REISTERSTOWN ROAD 
Baltimore, Md. 



556 



DIAMONDS OF QUALITY 

Easily selected at your Navy Exchange by consulting 

BENNETT BROTHERS BLUE BOOK illustrating 

thousands of useful articles. 

Order through your Navy Exchange Officer or submit 

your individual order direct. Either way will be gladly 

honored. 

BENNETT BROTHERS, Inc. 

Constant service for over 50 years 

485 Fifth Avenue 30 East Adams Street 

NEW YORK CHICAGO, ILL. 




WATCHES 

DIAMONDS 

LEATHER GOODS 

JEWELRY 

STERLING SILVER 

FURS 

PIPES 

TROPHIES 

SMOKERS' 

ARTICLES 



GIFTS OF 

ALL KINDS 



Ask your Battalion Supply Officer or Ship's Service to show 
you the BLUE BOOK from BENNETT BROTHERS 



TO THE NAVAL 
ACADEMY CLASS 
OF 1956: 

The twilight of your 
Academy days is at hand 
. . . the dawn of a new 
future looms ahead for 
each of you in the Class 
of 1956. That future 
holds in its timeless hands 
a grave responsibility as 
well as a golden oppor- 
tunity for service. We 
know that each of you 
will fulfill your tour of 
duty in the glorious tra- 
dition of the Navy. Good 
luck and smooth sailing! 

Submitted by a Weil Wisher 



tST. 1918 




NAN CO 



329 E. 5th Avenue, Anchorage, Alaska 
608 Howard Street, San Francisco, California 
3255 5th Avenue, San Diego, California 
121 Linden Avenue, Long Beach, California 
1915 First Avenue, Seattle, Washington 
221 Fourth Avenue, New York, New York 



TEL 54873 

TEL EXbrook 2-3221 

TEL CYprus 87187 

TEL LB 35-4848 

TEL Main 8324 

TEL GRamercy 3-7963 



SETH S. LOW, President 



EST. 1916 




Specializing in Nationally Advertised Brands of Merchandise to the Military Forces Since 1918. 



ELGIN WATCHES 
OMEGA WATCHES 
DORMEYER MIXERS 
APEX WATCH BANDS 



GRUEN WATCHES 
HADLEY BANDS 
UNIVERSAL APPLIANCES 
ROLEX WATCHES 



JACOBY-BENDER BANDS 
KEEPSAKE DIAMONDS 
ADMIRAL RADIOS 
REMINGTON 



PLUS MANY OTHER FINE LINES OF QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
"Round the World Representation Bached Up By Years of Experience" 



HONOLULU 



GUAM 



YOKOHAMA 



MANILA 



LONDON 



557 



WHY WAIT TILL YOU'RE 10,000 MILES AWAY? 

Discover Oar Banking Services for Navy Personnel TODAY 




BANK BY MAIL— You deposit or withdraw with 
simple forms nnd use convenient, jrcc postage-paid 
envelopes. 

ALLOTMENT SAVINGS ACCOUNTS-Simply 
allot part of your pay to a savings account at The 
Seamen's. Don't take chances on spending or losing 
the money. You specify the amount and each month 
the allotment is mailed direct to your savings ac- 
count here. 

FOREIGN REMITTANCES -Promptly and easilj 
arranged by Seamen's depositors who wish to send 
money abroad. 

Now's the time to make your arrangements with us. 
A call, a card or a visit will do the trick! 



Put Your Money To Work Now! 
DIVIDENDS FROM DAY OF DEPOSIT 

• 

THE SEAMEN'S BANK 
tor SAVINGS 

Over 126 Years of Savings Bank Service— Chartered 1829 

Main Office: 30 Wall Street, Nov York 5, \ \ 
Fifth Avenue Office: 546 Fifth Ave., New York 36, N. Y. 

CABLE ADDRESS: SEASAVE NEW YORK 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



SAFE NAVIGATION FOR YOUR SAVINGS 



Glad to 

Have You 

Aboard— 

Any Time! 



Die new Bellevue-Stratford 
flies .i brand-new welcome 
flag for you, whenever you 
come to Philadelphia. We're 

sure you'll enjoy our newly- 
decorated and air-condi- 
tioned guest rooms . . . the 
completely glamourized 
Stratford Garden . . . and 
the ever-popular Hunt 
Room. For your lady, the 
brand-new Viennese Room — 
serving cocktails in a 
pleasant manner. 



tne new 
Bellevue-Stratford 

Broad Street at Walnut. Philadelphia 2, Pa. 



// / / In rincr S rJLinrarii 



\ M MINER'S METEOROLOGY 

by Charles G. H alpine, Captain, USN (Ret.), and 
H.H. Taylor, Lt. Commander, USN 

KNIGHT'S MODERN SEAMANSHIP, 12th Ed. 
Revised by Ralph S. Wentworth, Commodore, 
I SN i Ret. I assisted bv John V. Noel, Jr., Captain, 

USN 

THE INTERNATIONAL MARITIME 
DICTIONARY 

by Rene deKerchove 

MANUAL OF CELESTIAL NAVIGATION 

by Arthur A. Ageton, Rear Admiral, USN (Ret. J 

DAMAGE CONTROL: A Manual for Naval Person- 
nel, 2nd. Ed. 

by Thomas J. Kelly, Rear Admiral, USN (Ret.) 

SHIPHANDLING 

by E.R. King and John V. Noel, Jr., Captain, USN 

RADAR AND ELECTRONIC NAVIGATION 
by G.J. Sonnenberg 



D. Van Nostrand Co., Inc. 

12i) ALEXANDER ST. PRINCETON, N. J. 



558 




SERVICE NAPKIN BAND 

Band is made of heavy weight sterling silver. The 
owner's name is engraved below his own class crest — 
ships and stations are engraved across the ends and 
back. A permanent record in sterling of his entire 
service career. 

Price including crest, engraving of name 
and Federal tax $10.00 



TILGHMAN COMPANY 

Registered Jeweler • American Gem Society 



44 State Circle 



Annapolis 



MINIATURE RINGS 

UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY 

CLss of 1957 

♦ 

Jeweled with diamonds and 
colored precious stones 

FINEST QUALITY ONLY 

at moderate prices 

Please write for folder with prices 

J. E. CALDWELL & CO. 

Jezcelers . . . Silversmiths . . . Stationers 

CHESTNUT and JUNIPER STREETS 
Philadelphia 7, Pa. 



f urcnuded with f^ride . . . 

^Jreudured ^swlwciitA 




fr 



John J. Courtney & Co. 



ENGAGEMENT 

and 

WEDDINGS 

RINGS 

45? Fifth Avenue, New York 



559 



ANDERSON BROS. CONSOLIDATED COS , INC, 

Cotton Garment Manufacturers 



1900-1956 
Danville • Virginia 



\3$£\ 



Makers of Top Quality 

MEN'S UNDERWEAR 

SPORTSWEAR 

PAJAMAS 

ROBERT REIS & CO. 

Empire State Building 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Makers of Famous REIS PERMA-SIZED SCANDALS 



WEMBLEY 
NOR-EAST 

America's Favorite 
UNIFORM TIE 




CRUSH IT 





KNOT II 



TW , ST NOT A WRINKLE 

NEWARK, NEW ORLEANS, LOS ANGELES 
Sales Offices, NEW YORK and CHICAGO 



Wear Esquire Socks 

The Smartest Thing on Two Feet 



560 



MANUFACTURERS OF 


ELECTRONIC INSTRUMENTS 


MULTI-CHANNEL OSCILLOSCOPES-MULTI-GUN CATHODE 


RAY TUBES-SINGLE-GUN CATHODE RAY TUBES 


RESEARCH — ENGINEERING — DESIGN 


1200 E. Mermaid Lane eleCtrOHlC tub E CDipOratiOIl Philadelphia 18, Pa. 




ELECTRONICS CORP 






ORP. I 

TREET H 



794 EAST 140 'h s 

NEW YORK 54. N. Y. 

□ 

ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT 

ELECTRO-MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT 

& SERVING THE ARMED FORCES is our most 
important business. 




MORE AND MORE 



OF THE WORLD'S WORK 



DEPENDS ON 



CONTINENTAL 
POWER 




Whether or not a piece of power equipment turns out to 
be a "good buy" depends in large degree on the skill 
with which the engine is matched to the rest of the 
machine. That is why it's wise, when buying such equip- 
ment, to choose one of the leading makes — a make with 
Red Seal power. In that way, you get an engine which is 
not only tailored to its job, but backed by specialized 
experience dating from 1902. 

PARTS AND SERVICE EVERYWHERE 




WATERMAN PRODUCTS COMPANY 



Pocketscope ® 



2445 EMERALD STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 25, PA. 

Manufacturers of 
Pulsescope® 



Rakscope® 



Rayonic® Cathode Ray Tubes and Other Associated Equipment 



561 



n 'Pteccdcea 



that counts . . . 

. . whether it's the long 
pass that wins the ball 
game or the manufacture 
of quality electro-mech- 
anical servo components. 
Now more than ever, In- 
dustry and the Armed Ser- 
vices are calling upon the 
Belock organization to sup- 
ply that extra measure of 
quality that is necessary for 
precision servo units. The 
Armed Services and Indus- 
try must have the best . . . 
. . . the best means Belock 
electro-mechanical servi 
components. 

catalog available upon request 



. yy<wv<^ <sy/j/?//Avs/// cwae?a£/?/i 



COLLEGE POINT 



NEW YORK 



Midshipman studies 
a Bailey Feed Water 
Control Value 




Bailey Boiler Controls 

1. Improve Maneuverability 

2. Prevent Smoke 

3. Protect Personnel and Equipment 

4. Insure Fuel Economy 

5. Carry on alone during emergencies 



BAILEY METER COMPANY 



CcrCtied. . i-cx Sttxurv Plant*, 




Holley Carburetor Company 



Manufacturers of 



Automotive aod Aviatioo Accessories 



11955 EAST NINE MILE ROAD 



VAN DYKE, MICHIGAN 



Phone: JEFFERSON 6-1900 



562 



THE 


BEST OF GOOD 


FORTUNE TO YOU YOUNG OFFICERS ABOUT TO 




START ON YOUR NAVAL CAREERS. 








AYERS 


HAGAN-BOOTH 

CONTRACTORS 


INC. 




35 WESTMINSTER STREET 


PROVIDENCE, RHODE 


ISLAND 




From the early torpedo boats of the 1890's to the 
Forrest Sherman class of 1955 each new design of 
Bath-built destroyers has been a distinct advance 
in naval construction. 



is mm mm w@m 

Shipbuilders & Engineers 
BATH, MAINE 



WATERBURY TOOL 

Division of VICKERS INCORPORATED 

VARIABLE DELIVERY PUMPS-HYDRAULIC TRANSMISSIONS 

WATERBURY, CONNECTICUT 



563 



Controllable- 
Pitch 
Ship 
Propellers 



Contributing (o modern vessel propulsion, 
S. Morgan Smith Company has played 
a major role in the development and manu 
facture of Controllable-Pitch Ship 
Propellers. 

Other equipment we have manufactured 
for the U.S. Navy includes catapults, 
arresting engines, special valves and ad- 
justable blade axial flow pumps for 
drydock and model testing facilities, 



S. MORGAN SMITH 

S. MORGAN SMITH CO.. YORK PENNSYLVANIA 






BEST WISHES 
















TO 


















THE 


CLASS 


OF 


1956 






NEW 


YORK DOCK COMPANY 

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK 




Rear 


Admiral H. A. Flan 
Chairman of the 


igan, USN (Ret.) 
Board 








C. E 

Pres 


Hicks 

dent 



564 




Cuff Links 
in the Navy 

Cuff links contribute much to the smartly turned-out 
appearance of Navy men. 

For years Navy men have worn Krementz quality cuff 
links under adverse and changing climatic conditions. 

The Krementz process of plating with a heavy overlay of 
genuine 14 Kt. gold makes this finer jewelry look richer 
and wear longer. 




Cuff Links and Tie Holder made with an overlay of 14 
Karat Gold. Cuff Links 37.50. Tie Holder 34. (plus tax). 



KREMENTZ 

FINE QUALITY JEWELRY 

Evening Jewelry • Cuff Links • Tie Holders 
Belt Buckles 

From 33.00 to 325.00 plus tax 
Available wherever fine jewelry is sold. 



Krementz & Co. 



Newark 5, New Jersey 




with VHF Tuner, 
llightly higher with UHF 



Mai an a vox EXTRA VALUE 

J PERFORMANCE FEATURES 

• Super-Dependable MAGNA-TRONIC Trans- 
former-Powered CHASSIS 

• 16,000 VOLTS PICTURE POWER for fiinest 
fringe or local reception with clearest, 
sharpest pictures obtainable 

• 41 MEGACYCLE IF AMPLIFIER for 
minimum interference and maximum picture detail 

e Finest VHF "CASCODE" and UHF 

"TELERAMIC" TUNERS for best reception 

• New Easy Vision— CONVENIENCE TOP 
TUNING 

• OMNI-D1RECTIONAL SPEAKER for 
greatly improved sound distribution 

• LOCAL or DISTANCE SELECTOR SWITCH 
for best area viewing 

COME IN FOR A PROOF DEMONSTRATION TODAY 
See and Hear Magnavox Superiority 



navox 



"1 



565 



Washiw 



•Arf''ftjstiui^i 



District 7-5300 







A3, qualit)' 



betted Wurv^andise 



rnstmiti )i i uli n 

iflSB hC 

dedicated to providing bcttt 

and ' rendering bxittft sprviife for the 

'lf» III 
, ■ f%ll|r , .. , ; 

peoplfeljdf idje Waging ton area. 

til" u- \ 

A Store Worthy of the 
Nation's Capital 



Visit ALPERSTEIN'S 

Military Discount Department 



For all the Nationally Famous Brands of 
Furniture - Bedding Refrigerators - 

Washers — Ironers — Electrical Appliances — 
House Furnishings and Everything Else for 
your home. 

CASH OR TERMS 



You can rely on our years of experi- 
ence in servicing Military Personnel 

ALPERSTEIN'S 

Since 1904 



11.11 W . Baltimore Street 
Baltimore 23, Maryland 

S \ ratOga 7-5235 



1020 Seventh St.. V \\ . 

Washington 1. D. C. 

NAtional 11-8559 



* Your Sword Should be the Best * 

Be Sure the Blade Bears the Familiar H&H Eagle Trade Mark 

The H&H Sword Case is 
Silver-Cloth Lined to Prevent Tarnishing. 

The H&H Sword Belt is 

Genuine Cowhide, Nylon Stitched for Longer Wear, 

and with Lock Swivel. 

The H&H Sword Knot is 
Hand Made of Superior Gilt. 

For Military Equipment. Insignia and Uniform Trimmings 
at Better Dealers and Ships' Stores it's 



T^V/ 




HILBORN-HAMBURGER, INC 

15 East 26th St., New York. N. Y. 



^66 






Established in 1805 




THE FARMERS NATIONAL RANK 



Member of Federal Reserve 



of Annapolis 

CHURCH CIRCLE, SEVERNA PARK 
BEST WISHES TO '56 
• Member of Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



TVeM T><mc . . . 

GRADUATING CLASS of 1956 



The twilight of your Academy days is at hand. 
. . . New future awaits each of you with a challenge 
of grave responsibility as well as a golden op- 
portunity for service. We know your tour of duty 
will be in keeping with the highest tradition of 
the Navy. 



Good Luck and Smooth Sailing 



from 

AN ALUMNUS 




IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT TO 
NAVY 

Commissioned Officers (Active and Reserve) 

P.O.s (Must be in top 3 grades, married and at least 25 years old) 

Household Members of Families of Above 

• •••••• 

SAVE up to 30% 

on AUTO INSURANCE 

also substantial savings on life Insurance. 

• •••••• 

The Government Employees Insurance Companies rate com- 
missioned Officers and senior N.C.O.'s — and Federal. State and 
Municipal civilian government employees as PREFERRED 
RISKS! 

Maximum Protection at Minimum Cost. 



NA TION-WIDE PROTECTION 
Write Dept. T. 



NATION-WIDE SERVICE 



Government Employees 

ymwiance Comfxmm 

(Capital Slock Compom'ei— Not Affiliated With United Statei Gov 
Government Employee! Insurance Building 
Washington 5, D. C. Sterling 3-4400 



SCRANTON . . . Banking Headquarters 

for MIDSHIPMEN of the U. S. NAVAL ACADEMY 

We have many specialized Personal Services including — Savings, Safe Keeping, Checking and a 
Complete Banking Service for First Classmen, Graduates and Service Personnel, write for details. 

The FIRST NATIONAL Bank 



of SCRANTON, PA. 



Organized 1863 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



567 



Compliments of the 



ARROW-HART & HEGEMAN ELECTRIC COMPANY 



HARTFORD • CONNECTICUT 



BEST FOR BOATS 




INTERLUX FINISHES 

. • • stay beautiful 

Interlux Finishes have everything ... beauty, 

lasting protection, ease of application and 

extreme durability. Formulated for marine y 

f \\\VEniaU0/?3/ 
use, they resist wear and weather and can f m«h,{V%ai NT $ 

be scrubbed as clean os o porcelain dish. \ ^_ ^ S 

The yachtsman who finds them so satisfactory WRITE FOR 

for his topsides, decks, spars, bright work and COLOR CARDS 

interiors, will also find them outstanding for use in bathrooms and 

kitchens and on woodwork, porch floors and furniture. 

International Paint Company. Inc. 

21 Weil Si., New York 6. N. Y. • S. Linden Ave.. S. Son Fronciico, Col. 

028 Pleoionl Si., New Orleoni 15, Lo. 
WORLD'S LARGEST MARINE PAINT MAKERS 



mm IpEm 




BEST IN HOMES 



To each of you Young Officers about to 

embark on your Naval Career go the 

best wishes of 



RUSSELL-POLING 
and COMPANY 



122 EAST 42nd STREET 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 




FLOUR CITY 




IRON COMPANY 

2637 27TH AVENUE SOUTH • MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 



568 



To you young officers about to embark on your Naval Career go our best wishes. 

GOOD LUCK AND SMOOTH SAILING! 

The Black Diamond Grit Company 

849-877 NORTH AVENUE 

EAST OF HIGHWAYS US 1, STATE 25, ELIZABETH 4, N. J. 

All Types Sand-Blast Abrasives • Special Gradings • All Types Mine and Furnace Slags 

Home of the Famous Black Diamond Grit • Hard, Sharp, Angular, Fast Cleaning 

Also Black Diamond Mineral Shot For Fast, Smooth Sand Blasting 



THE STRONG ELECTRIC 
CORPORATION 

87 City Park Avenue 
TOLEDO 2, OHIO 

Manufacturers of 

MOTION PICTURE PROJECTION 

ARC LAMPS 

ARC FOLLOW SPOT LAMPS 

GRAPHIC ARTS PRINTING AND 

CAMERA ARC LAMPS 

INCANDESCENT SPOT LAMPS 

ARC SLIDE PROJECTORS 

RECTIFIERS 

REFLECTORS 

SEARCHLIGHTS 



Telephone East Boston 7-2907 

DELECO 

INCORPORATED 

MARINE -INDUSTRIAL WIRING 
ELECTRONIC INSTALLATIONS 

MASTER ELECTRICIANS 
REFRIGERATION 

Installations Electronics 

Wiring Refrigeration 

141 Border Street 
East Boston 28, Mass. 



General Electronic Laboratories, Inc. 

Research and Development 
18 AMES STREET • CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 

QUALITY ENGINEERING 
FOR NAVAL APPLICATIONS 



569 



Greetings and Good Wishes to the 

Officers and Men of our Naval Shipyards 

and to you young officers about to join them. 

Baier & Ackerman, Inc. 



Manufacturers of 

Baco Moulded Cable Packing 



9 EAST FORTIETH ST., 



NEW YORK 16, N. Y. 



CONTROL INSTRUMENT COMPANY. INC. 

Subsidiary nf Burroughs Corporation 



Gun Fire Cuntrul Systems 



Salinity Indicator Systems 



Special Machines and Equipment 



67-3 5th STREET 



BROOKLYN 32, NEW YORK 




LET US POINT OUT THIS FACT 

Any ball or roller bearing you require for any industrial 
or automotive replacement purpose— you can get from 

BEARINGS SPECIALTY CO. 

665 BEACON STREET - BOSTON 15, MASS. 

A complete OEM warehouse stock of Truarc retaining rings and 
mounting pliers for prompt delivery. 

Phone COpley 7-5325 



Established 1919 



At Kenmore Square 



570 



Best Wishes from 

E. V. CAMP STEEL 
WORKS 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA 
Manufacturers of 

Chain and Fittings for Anchors and Moorings 

Anchors (Non-magnetic, Carbon, and Alloy Steel) 

Ship Propellers (Stainless and Carbon Steel) 

Cast Armor 

Cast Ship Parts, such as 

Rudder Posts 

Stern Frames 

Hawse Pipes 

Deck and Shell Bolsters 

Capstans 

Miscellaneous Cast Steel Products 

(Carbon, Stainless, Alloy, and Hadfield) 



A Salute from 
TEMCO, Inc. 

whose extensive manufacturing facilities have 
been employed during both World War II 
and the Korean conflict to bring the might of 
America's power to bear on the enemy. In the 
form of bombs and shells TEMCO makes its 
contribution, supporting the greater effort made 
by the members of the Armed Forces. As during 
periods of actual conflict, TEMCO's manufac- 
turing power continues to help keep the peace. 



TEMCO 



f inc. 



NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 




...FOR THE MOST WORK, LEAST UPKEEP 
.FOR LONGEST LIFE, GREATEST MANEUVERABILITY, 
POWER AND RUGGEDNESS! 

GERLINGER Material Carriers and Fork Lift Trucks have 
proved lor over 30 years to be the answer to loading, hauling, 
stacking and delivery problems of logging, lumber mills and 
yards, and wood product factories the world over Feature- 
for feature, Gerlingers consistently prove their flexibility to 
meet the exacting standards of material handling require- 
ments of all heavy industries. 

GERLINGER CARRIER CO., DALLAS, OREGON 




571 



The REMINGTON 60 DeCuxe, 

For a quick once-over-lightly before an reach for the Remington. At all fine 

evening date or a fast, close, easy-on-the- stores and our 120 Nationwide Shaving 

face, morning shave — men everywhere Headquarters. 

/* DAY HOME TRIAL Ask your $750 TRAVE'IN for any 

dealer about this no-risk free trial plan. standard make electric shaver. 




Favored by Men Everywhere! 




The REMINGTON 



The complete typewriter in portable size 
No other portable gives you so many features 
for faster, better, easier typing. See the Quiet- 
riter at your nearby dealer's today. 




KINGSPORT 
PRESS 



frvwitiAect fay 



KII1GSKRRFT 



KINGSPORT PRESS, INC. 



KINGSPORT, TENNESSEE 



572 



DEPENDABLE 

AIRBORNE ELECTRONIC 

EQUIPMENT 

SINCE 

1928 




7Ae7teca 
MS-8'I tySttoafarfj 




Aircraft Radio Corporation 

BOONTON, NEW JERSEY 








first in 

automatic 
controls 

Since 1915, Ford Instrument Company 
has designed, developed and produced 
fine precision Controls and Computers 
...for the Armed Forces and for Industry. 

FORD INSTRUMENT 
COMPANY 

DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION 
31-10 Thomson Avenue, Long Island Cily, N. Y. 





Combines For the First Time 

Pantobase 
BLC 



(All Bases) 



(Boundary Layer 
Control) 

"It is wi;h pride that Stroukoff Air- 
craft is producing for the United 
States Air Force the most efficient 
advanced assault air transport in the 
history of military aviation. 

This development combines slow 
landing speeds through means of the 
Boundary Layer Control system, and 
includes the Pantobase installation, 
both designed by Stroukoff Aircraft 
Corporation. 

The MS-8-1 is able to land and take- 
off from unprepared surfaces such as 
rough terrain, sand, snow, ice, ordi- 
nary runways and to operate from 
water as well. It will do so at low 
speeds never before possible with air- 
craft of its weight; and in half the 
area needed by its prototypes. 



dWouhou 



WEST TRENTON NEW JERSEY 



Aircraft Corporation 

N I 



5.73- 




From 

Atlantic, Gulf 

and 

Pacific Ports to 

MEDITERRANEAN 

FAR EAST 

NORTH EUROPE 

UNITED KINGDOM 



States # 
Marine //hes 



90 BROAD STREET • HAnover 2-2000 • NEW YORK 4, N. Y. 

OFFICES; Baltimore • Brownsville • Chicago • Dallas • Fresno • Galveston 

Houston • Long Beach • los Angeles * Memphis • Mobile • New Orleans 

Norfolk • Philadelphia • Portland • San Francisco • Seattle • St. Louis 

Washington, D. C. • Inchon • London • Pusan • Seoul • Tokyo 

AGENTS: Cleveland • Detroit 





B£THI|EHEM 
. STIEl 



BETHLEHEM STEEL COMPANY 

SHIPBUILDERS SHIP REPAIRERS 

NAVAL ARCHITECTS AND MARINE ENGINEERS 



SHIPBUILDING YARDS 

QUINCY YARD 

Quincy, Mass. 

STATEN ISLAND YARD 

Staten Island, N. Y. 

BETHLEHEM-SPARROWS POINT 
SHIPYARD, INC. 

Sparrows Point, Md. 

BEAUMONT YARD 

Beaumont, Texas 

SAN FRANCISCO YARD 

San Francisco, Calif. 

SAN PEDRO YARD 

Terminal Island, Calif. 
SHIP REPAIR YARDS 

BOSTON HARBOR 

Boston Yard 

NEW YORK HARBOR 

Brooklyn 27th Street Yard 

Brooklyn 56th Street Yard 

Hoboken Yard 

Staten Island Yard 

BALTIMORE HARBOR 

Baltimore Yard 

GULF COAST 

Beaumont Yard 

(Beaumont, Texas) 

SAN FRANCISCO HARBOR 

San Francisco Yard 

LOS ANGELES HARBOR 

San Pedro Yard 



General Offices: 25 Broadway, New York 4, N. Y. 

On the Paz<fc Coos' shipbuilding and ship repa>r<ng are pclormtd by the 
Shipbti ielhlehem PocHk Coast Sleet Corporation 



574 




The smartest heads 
in the Service wear 



BERKSHIRE CAPS 

Lee Uniform Cap Mfg. Co. 

403 W. Redwood St. BALTIMORE 1, MD. 



"Good Lack 
and God Speed!' 



To the Graduating Class of 1956 this Bank says, 
"Good Luck and God Speed" as you leave the 
Naval Academy to join your brother Officers, 
wherever duty may call. 

Just a word of appreciation from us, and our best 
wishes to vou for all the years ahead. 



The FIRST NATIONAL Bank 

SCRANTON, PA. 
Est. 1863 
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 




By Appointment 

to Her Majesty the Queen 
Makers of Livery Hats 




By Appointment 

to His Royal Highness 

the Duke of Edinburgh 

Naval Tailors and Outfitters 



part of a great tradition 

Ever since Nelson's day, Gieves have been making uniforms (and civilian 
clothes) that are a fitting compliment to the Services, thus to-day we can 
claim that Gieves has become a part — however small — of a great tradition. 



Gieves 



Outfitters to 

the Navies of the World. 

Established 1785 



l_ I M I TE D 



27 OLD BOND STREET LONDON W 1 • Telephone HYDe Park 2276 

Also at: Bath. Bournemouth. Chatham. Liverpool. Portsmouth. Southampton. 
Weymouth. Londonderry. Dartmouth. Malta. Gibraltar. Edinburgh. Plymouth. 



575 




<!$> 



Serving the Army, 
Navy and Air Force 
Since 1922 



Manufacturers of 

. COMMUNICATIONS, RADAR AND 
NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT 

. SELENIUM RECTIFIERS 

. GERMANIUM & SILICON DIODES 
AND TRANSISTORS 

. DIELECTRIC HEATING EQUIPMENT 



-<^> 



RADIO RECEPTOR COMPANY. Inc. 



In Radio and Electronics Since 1922 

240 WYTHE AVENUE, BROOKLYN 11, N. Y. 



We Manufacture 

RADIO BATTERIES 

for 

THE MILITARY SERVICES 




DRY BATTERIES FOR ALL TYPES 

for 
CIVILIAN USE 

MARATHON BATTERY CO. 

WAUSAU, WISCONSIN 



RAY ELECTRIC 

ELECTRONIC 

INSTRUMENTS 

Laboratory, Production, and 
Service Test Equipment 

Write/or Catalog 



Laboratory, Production, 

• Sweeping Oscillators 

• Impedance Match Indicators 

• Spectrum Analyzers 

• Random Noise Generators 

• Pulse Carrier Generators 

• Pulse Generators 

• Gain or Loss Measuring 

Equipment 

• Signal Generators 

• Fourier Analyzers for Transient 

and Steady State 



and Service Test Equipment 

• Variable Time Delay at Audio 

Frequencies 

• Sona-Stretcher for Doubling 

Time Duration 

• TV, FM, Radar UHF Sweeping 

Oscillators 

• Q-Measurement 

• Crystal and Variable Market 

Generators 

• TV Picture and Sound Generator 

(Black and White and Colon 



KAY ELECTRIC COMPANY • i* maple avenue, pine brook, new jersey 



576 



FIN-TYPE COILS 

For 
Fast, Efficient 




HEATING 

€Utd 

COOLING 

AtROflN 

Corporation 

101 Greenway Ave., Syracuse 1, N. Y. 




] 4yn*M< 



'^^ola£i<yy)A 



CLASS OF 1956 

UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY 



The world's finest, most com- 
plete line of metal, wood 
and plastic display and 
merchandising equipment is 
produced in these modern 
plants. 



A high capacity foundry for 
the volume production of 
precision and shell mold 
castings. 




New York Chicago los Angeles 

47 W. 34lll Slreel 111 W Hdami Si. 1M1 So. Figoe™ Si. 




FR Probe and Drogue 



new 






system gives 
long range for Navy wings 

Perfection of the FR Probe and Drogue system — termed sim- 
pler than making a landing — has helped much to make aerial 
refueling a completely reliable and routine operation. The com- 
pactness of the FR system means simple installation on wing 
tips or in bomb bays. Its completely auto- 
matic operation permits remote control ^ s^i^i 
and requires no specially-trained crews > 

Flight 
Refueling 



INCORPORATED 



y* 



FRIENDSHIP INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 



BALTIMORE 3, MD. 



577 




FOR THE ARMED FORCES 

Radar 
Computers 
Gyroscopes 
Resolvers 

SERVOMECHANISMS 

& Systems for Fire Control 

Bombing, Guidance & Simulation 

REEVES INSTRUMENT CORPORATION 

A Subsidiary of 

Dynamics Corporation of America 

215 EAST 91st STREET, NEW YORK 28, N. Y 



Ser 


vo Amplifiers 


Elec 


trontc Chassis 


Cea 


r Assemblies 


I Ins 


tmmenlntlon 


| Sh --' 


Metal Cabinets 








AUCHBAID, PENNA 




ING ALLS 

SHIPBUILDING CORPORATION 

EXECUTIVE OFFICES: Birmingham, Alabama, U.S.A. 
SHIPYARDS: Pascagoula, Mississippi; Decatur, Alabama 
OFFICES: New York, Philadelphia, Washington, 
Houston, New Orleans 



578 



HUNTER 



DO 



LAS 



RIVERSIDE, CALIF. 



ALUMINUM 
COLD FORGING 



Completely integrated 
facility for the mass 
production of aluminum 
cold forgings and pre- 
cision machined parts 



KNOW-HOW" FOR THE NAVY 



579 



i 



HARBESON HOUGH LIVINGSTON AND LARSON 
VON STORCH EVANS AND BURKAVAGE 

ASSOCIATED ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS 



PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 



IT'S THE PEOPLE* WHO MAKE HUGHES 




MORE THAN 20,000 OP THEM' 

Through research, development and 
production, the people of Hughes are 
proud of their contribution to America 
. the world . . and peace through 
advanced electronics. 



REDUCED RATES — HOUSEHOLD GOODS — PERSONAL EFFECTS • TRANS-CONTINENTAL FREIGHT SERVICE 



ARIZONA - BRITISH COLUMBIA - CALIFORNIA - IDAHO - MONTANA - NEVADA 
NEW MEXICO - OKLAHOMA - OREGON - TEXAS - UTAH - WASHINGTON 

OFFICES IN ALL PRINCIPAL CITIES 

UNIVERSAL CARLOADING & DISTRIBUTING CO., INC. 

DIVISION OF UNITED STATES FREIGHT CO. 

Daily Consolidated Merchandise Service- Fast- Dependable- Economical 

CENTRE STREET & GUILFORD AVE., BALTIMORE 1, MD. LEXINGTON 7630 



580 






NATIONAL PUBLISHING COMPANY 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



1 1/ IctkerS of the oLucku d5aa i^oi/erd 



1945-1946-1947-1950- 



iaaJi J—wck cz^tt . . . 



To The Naval 
Academy Class 

Of 1956: 

The twilight of your 
Academy days is at hand 
. . . the dawn of a new 
future looms ahead for 
each of you in the Class 
of 1956. That future 
holds in its timeless hands 
a grave responsibility as 




well as a golden oppor- 
tunity for service. We 
know that each of you 
will fulfill your tour of 
duty in the glorious tra- 
dition of the Navy. Good 
luck and smooth sailing! 




Submitted by a 

WELL WISHER 



581 






\ 



><■> 



* 



:* 



-v 






&> 



*$& 



&> 



*& 



.o*" 




../ Institutional Vfeuagtt 



Officers: 

KEEP YOUR EYE ON THE MAN WHO MAILED THIS ENVELOPE! 



A message to ('. S. ffavy Electronics and 
Communications Officers . . . 

Every week hundreds of envelopes like 
the one above are mailed from Naval per- 
sonnel aboard Navy ships and stations. 
They contain completed examination pa- 
pers based on officially recognized CRKI 
electronics training, submitted by Naval 
CREI students who desire training above 
and beyond the scope of rating courses, and 
who personally pay their tuition, and study 
in their off-duty hours. 

Keep your eye on the men who are doing 
this. They will be your better radio-elec- 
tronics men -and they will stay — and stay 
longer in service, thanks to CREI advanced 
training. 

Since its inception 28 years ago, CREI 
has served the Navy at a high level of 
quality and integrity. Mr. E. H. Rietzke, 
founder and president, was himself a Navy 
Chief Radioman and First Chief Instructor 
at the Bellevue Naval Radio Materiel 
School. 



Thousands of Navy men, including all 
ratings and commissioned officers, have 
utilized CREI training to supplement their 
Navy courses. Many Naval Officers recom- 
mend CREI to men in their command as a 
proven way to obtain a high level of sup- 
plementary practical electronics know-how. 
This is because they have seen the two-told 
results of CREI training: It helps build not 
only better Radio-electronics men . . . but 
also better Navy men men who because 
of their interest (and advancement) in elec- 
tronics become "sold" on service careers. 

Today approximately one-third of all 
CREI enrollees are Navy men, and this 
ratio has held for more than twenty years. 

Do you zcant to know more about CREI 
training, and how it can serve the Navy? 
We will be happy to send you a kit of five 
sample lessons, plus full details of the CREI 
program. The kit will give you a picture of 
the scope of CREI training, and assist you in 
making your own evaluation of our courses 
and methods. There is no cost or obligation. 
Please write to: 



CAPITOL RADIO ENGINEERING INSTITUTE 



Accredited Technical Institute Curricula 



Dept. 2 5C, 3224 Sixteenth Street, N.W. 



Washington 10, D. C. 



582 




From sensitive components to brawny launchers... 

AMF has missile experience you can use 

• "Precisioneering" power supplies for electronic control systems and developing complex 
launchers are two of AMF's many important contributions to our nation's missile programs • Today, 
AMF plays a part in more fhan half the missile programs now under way • And its activities cover 
practically every stage of design, development, and production . . . including mechanical, hydraulic, 
pneumatic and electronic test equipment . . . auxiliary power supplies . . . field and depot handling 
equipment . . . launchers . . . ground and flight control systems • See for yourself why AMF's expe- 
rience in missiles, as well as in a host of other fields, has made it the "can do" company. 



Research, Deve/opmenf, 

Production in these fields: 

• Armament 

« Bollislics 

• Radar Antennae 
• Guided Missile 

Support Equipment 
• Auxiliary Power Supplies 

• Control Syslems 



Another 




M 



DEFENSE 



Defense Products Group 

AMERICAN MACHINE & FOUNDRY COMPANY 

1101 North Royal Street, Alexandria, Va. 



583 



Twin-jet raider 

is Navy's largest carrier-based bomber 



A positive step in neutralizing an 
enemy sea force is to wreck or im- 
mobilize home ports and outlying 
bases. This strategy, to be successful, 
has always demanded a huge force. 

Now the Navy has a new weapon, 
a versatile jet bomber — the Douglas 
A3D Skywarrior — a fast, high-alti- 
tude raider with a nuclear wallop that 
could smash harbor installations, sub- 
marine pens or coast line defenses in 
a single blow. 

Skywarrior is not only the largest 
carrier-based bomber, but is faster 
than many fighters, and designed to 
handle a wide variety of missions. 




Depend on DOUGLAS 



Development of the A3D shows how Douglas works with the 
Navy on its long-range preparedness program. But without 
men and women to fly and service them, the Navy's air- 
planes are useless. If you agree that defense is everybody's 
business, give a thought to a career with the U. S. Navy. 



First in Aviation 




584 



AHMED FORCES MEDICAL AID ASSOCIATION 

USAA BUILDING • 4119 BROADWAY • SAN ANTONIO 9, TEXAS 



The Armed Forces Medical Aid Associa- 
tion was organized as a non-profit associa- 
tion in 1953 at San Antonio, Texas. It was 
founded and is maintained for the purpose 
of providing service families of the Army, 
Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast 
Guard with low-cost health insurance pro- 
tection against large medical expenses re- 
sulting from extended hospitalization and 
surgical treatment of the serviceman's de- 
pendents. To a lesser degree it also provides 
coverage for medication, laboratory tests, 
X-Ray, first aid, ambulance, maternity care 
(after a ten-month waiting period), and 
other miscellaneous hospital charges. 

A unique provision of policies offered by 
the Association is the guaranteed payment 
of one-half the specified amounts for hos- 
pitalization if the dependent is confined in 
any government hospital. Although in these 
cases the dependent is given care at "govern- 
ment expense," an extended period of care 
can be costly. For instance, hospital sub- 
sistence charges, incidental family expenses, 
interruption of normal family life, and per- 
haps cost of traveling to and from a govern- 
ment hospital can burden a serviceman with 
appreciable expense for which he is not pre- 
pared. When one gives consideration to all 
the seemingly unrelated expenses incurred 
when dependents are hospitalized, it is easy 
to see why AFMAA initiated the half-pay- 
ment program for application when govern- 
ment hospitals are used. 



Too, if in the opinion of the military 
doctor the services of a civilian specialist 
are required in the government hospital — 
for which the government does not pay — 
the Association will pay up to the full 
amount shown in the surgical schedule for 
operations. 

Thus, the Armed Forces Medical Aid As- 
sociation is proud to join the list of non- 
profit associations organized for the sole 
benefit of service people. The Association 
operates on a cost basis and no profits or 
savings accrue to any one except the mem- 
bership. 

Any married American serviceman can 
secure, for his dependents, this group insur- 
ance covering a wide variety of medical 
costs. His regular monthly dues: $5.50 for 
wife only, $8.00 for wife and any number of 
children. 

AFMAA coverage applies everywhere. 
Dependents of servicemen stationed over- 
seas receive full coverage, whether they are 
with the member or remain in the United 
States. Thus, U. S. servicemen, at home or 
abroad, can provide against the emergency 
of dependent hospitalization in a civilian 
institution and against the miscellaneous 
costs that come up even when military facili- 
ties are used. Use of foreign hospitals and 
doctors is authorized under coverages and 
benefits provided in policies issued through 
the Association. 

For information write to the Association 
at 41 19 Broadway, San Antonio 9, Texas. 



Board nf Trustees 



Lieut. Gen. R. W. Harper, USAF (Ret.) 
President 

Lieut. Gen. H. R. Harmon, USAF 
1st Vice President 

Maj. Gen. E. A. Noyes, USA (Ret.) 
2nd Vice President 

Brig. Gen. C. R. Glenn, USAF (Ret.) 

Commander R. L. McVay, USNR 

Lieut. Col. H. F. Schwethelm, USMC 



Col. R. K. Simpson, USAF (Ret.) 

Col. C. E. Brand, USA (Ret.) 

Brig. Gen. M. F. Davis, USAF (Ret.) 

Brig. Gen. J. H. Foster, USAFR 

Capt. E. M. Waldron, USN (Ret.) 

Maj. Gen. C. C. Chauncey, USAF (Ret.) 

Col. C. E. Cheever, USA (Ret.) 

Maj. Gen. C. C. McMullen, USAF (Ret.) 

Brig. Gen. Wm. Spence, USA (Ret.) 



585 



FLEET helper 




VEfyTOL 



\y (-iLtct&ljt (JLotpotatlon. 



MORTON , PENNSYLVANIA 



WALWORTH 

Manufacturers sinct /.S'-IJ 
valves. ..fittings. ..pipe wrenches 



Such mighty vessels as the USS Forrestal, the 
nuclear-powered USS Nautilus and her sister ship, 
the Seawolf, are equipped with Walworth Valves 
and Fittings to meet their special requirements. 
Walworth takes pride in its share in helping to 
make these tremendous achievements practical. 
General Offices: 60 East 12nd Street, New York 
17, N. Y. 








586 







Rugged comrade at arms . . . 



the 'Jeep* by Willys 

Like you, the Universal 'Jeep' is young^with a big future serving our Armed Forces. 

Developed during World War II, the 'Jeep' has gained increasing recognition in 
many branches of the service because of its ruggedness and versatility. It has also 
gained acceptance for the whole 'Jeep' family of 4-wheel-drive vehicles. In fact, 
in distant parts of the world, the 'Jeep' family of vehicles has become a symbol of 
American military prowess and civil leadership. 

Thanks to 4-wheel-drive, the 'Jeep' family of vehicles goes through sand, mud and 
snow, over bad roads and no roads, where ordinary vehicles can't go. It is rendering 
distinguished service to our armed forces in many parts of the world . . . and stands 
ready as a trusted companion at arms to you in your career in the Armed Forces. 



The 



^JCCp family 







4-wheel-drive Universal 'Jeep' 'Jeep' 4-wheel-drive Truck 'Jeep' 4-wheel-drive Station Wagon 'Jeep' 4-wheel-drive Sedan Delivery 



Willy 's .. .world 's largest manufacturer of '4-wheel- drive vehicles 



587 



J 



a kalute to the 
Officers ana Midshipmen 

of 

ANNAPOLIS 

ana 
Congratulations to the 

Class of 1056 






Z I V TELEVISION PROGRAMS INC 



588 



WJt-2* 



one . 



Graduating Class of 1956 

The twilight of your Academy days is at hand. 
. . . New future awaits each of you with a chal- 
lenge of grave responsibility as well as a golden 
opportunity for service. We know your tour of 
duty will be in keeping with the highest tradition 
of the Navy. 

Good Luck and Smooth Sailing 

Bellingham Shipyards Co. 

Bellinghani, Washington 




UNIVERSAL 
MOULDED 
PRODUCTS 
CORPORATION 

MANUFACTURERS OF: 

• Radio and Television Cabinets 

• Reinforced Fiberglas Plastics 

Prime Contractors to the 
Department of the Navy 



Plant: 

BRISTOL. VIRGINIA 



Executive Offices: 

1500 WALNUT STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 2. PENNA. 



"97euj 9?Wk«> 



FOR THE NAVY 



9 9 



• New Cresci Hi-lift Cargo 
Loaders now available for com- 
mercial use in 3 sizes. Extra 
Heavy Duty (9 ton capacity, 
illustrated). Heavy Duty (5 ton 
capacity). Medium Duty (2 x /i 
ton capacity). 

• Fifty years' experience in 
hydraulic hoists and bodies 
means safe, dependable, eco- 
nomical operation. Interchange- 
able — rugged construction — the 
safest unit of this type ever built. 

• For specifications and details 
on safety features, phone, wire 
or write, 

A. CRESCI & SON, INC. 




Vineland, N.J. 



VI 7-1700 



type Cresci Extra Heavy Duty Hi-lift Cargo Loader now beinc 
produced for the U. S. Navy. 



589 



for the significant 
facts of today's 
history-in-the making 




leaders in 
every field 
turn every week 

to NEWSWEEK 

THE MAGAZINE OF NEWS SIGNIFICANCE 



Only 



ft 



ft 



CHOCOLATES 



TASTE BETTER 

than 

ANY Other Candy 



A Secret Process of Homogenization 




&<>■ 




The VARIETY Box 







EXQUISITE 

CANDIES 



NORRIS CANDY COMPANY 

223 Peachtree St. N. E., Atlanta, Georgia 
Contract NSSO-1988 



590 



Greetings and Best Wishes from 

SOUND APPARATUS CD. 

STIRLING, N. J. 



Designers and Manufacturers of Graphic Level and 
Frequency Response Recorders 



TO THE YOUNG NAVAL OFFICERS OF THE 
NAVAL ACADEMY CLASS OF 1956: 

You Embark on Your Naval Career with the 
Best Wishes of the 

GEORGE CAMPBELL CO. 

40-1 1 149th STREET 
Flushing 54, N. Y. 



Severn School 



Severna Park, Md. 



A Country Boarding School for Bovs, 
on the Severn River Near Annapolis 



ALL BEST WISHES TO '56 

John B. Melvin 

and 
H. Tex Hughes 

Insurance Underwriters 

5 Maryland Avenue Annapolis, Maryland 

Provident Mutual Life Insurance Company 



Welcome Aboard! . . . 

At The Hecht Co. you're bound to find just the type of 
furniture and furnishings to make a home "shipshape." 
Ask about our credit plans . . . there's one designed to 
fit your needs like a set of "dress blues." 

FURNITURE— APPLIANCES— TELEVISION 
HOME FURNISHINGS 

THE HECHT CO. 

1125 WEST STREET— ANNAPOLIS 



P.O. Box 1469 


Telephone: Colonial 3-6174 


STEHLE, 


BEANS & BEAN, 

CONTRACTORS 

AND 

BUILDERS 

Annapolis, Maryland 


INC. 



The ANNAPOLIS BANKING 
& TRUST CO. 



A mown Wherever the Navy Goes 

EVERY BANKING 
FACILITY 



Member: Federal Reserve System — Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corporation 




THE J. F. JOHNSON 
LUMBER CO. 

Lumber, Millwork, Building Supplies 
Hardware and Paint 



ANNAPOLIS, MD. 
Col 3-2337 



GLEN BURNIE, MD. 
Glen B 100 



591 



MEREDITH-ROANE CO., INC 



1712 West Street 
ANNAPOLIS, MD. Co 1-3-9287 



With the compliments of 

JEFFERIES" HOSIERY 

Worn by the men of the 
U. S. Naval Academy 



Best Wishes 


to 


THE CLASS OF 1 < 


from 


ANTOINETTES PLACE 


"Famous for Pizza Pie" 


40 WEST STREET 





GOOD 


LUCK TO '56 




G. 


and 


J. 


GRILL 




MARYLAND AVE. 




ANNAPOLIS, 


MD. 



C^iectrical 



WIRING 
AND LIGHTING 

For Schools • Hospitals • Power Plants • Banks • 

Office Bldgs. • Apartments, Housing • Factories and 

Other Types of Construction 

WALTER TRULAND 

CORPORATION 

Electrical Constructing Engineers 

Jackson 8-4100 
Washington, D. C. Arlington, Va. 



"BON VOYAGE!" 

from your friends 



DUKELAND PACKING CO., Inc. 



B M.TIMORK. MD. 



ROYAL RESTAURANT 



Excellent Si i \ io 



23 WEST ST. 



Co-3-9167 



Best Wishes and Good Fortune to the Class of '56 

LITTLE CAMPUS INN 

AIR CONDITIONED 

61-63 Maryland Avenue Annapolis, Md. 

Host to the Brigade over 30 years 



592 



CARPEL, Inc 



4111 Menlo Drive Baltimore, Md. 

Distributors of 

LIBBY'S FROZEN FOODS 

MORTON'S BEEF PIES, CHICKEN PIES, and TURKEY PIES 

CROSSE & BLACKWELL FROZEN CONCENTRATED JUICES 



When Preble 

humbled the 

Barbary pirates . . . 

Crosse & Blackwell 

was almost a century old! 



In 1804 Crosse and Blackwell's 
chefs had 98 years of experience 
to draw upon. Skilled modern 
chefs, successors to those who 
began Crosse & Blackwell's tradi- 
tion 250 years ago, are making 
foods for you, today . . . foods 
as line as any man, seaman or 
landlubber, ever ate! 




Crosse & Blackwell Co. 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 

Fine Foods Since 1 706 



~Jo the \^la6d of- 36 

Congratulations ... on a grueling 
four years ... mission accomplished. 



Whoever you are . . . wherever you go . . . this 
big country goes with you in spirit. May you 
always realize that all thinking Americans know 
full well that you put "The Flag" first . . . (or first 
after "God"). 



God speed you... protect you 
comfort you. 

RUSS HAUM 
"Dindnrf" 

MERION, PA. 





Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. of Annapolis 
Suburban Club Carbonated Beverage Co., Inc. 

Admiral's Drive at West St., Annapolis, Md. 



593 



1956 Mh/iatures and Wedding Bands by Herff-Jones Co. World's largest 
Manufacturer of Class Rings. 

Descriptive literature and quotations 

will be mailed at your request. 

HERFF-JONES CO. 

EASTERN DIVISION 
571 BROAD STREET NEWARK 2, N. J. 



Dollar for Dollar You Can'f Beat 

PONTIAC 

"Ask the Previous Class" 



Or 



Marbert Motors, Inc. 

284 West Street Annapolis, Md. 

Phone COIonial 3-2387 



Primus 

CUSTOM 

NAVAL . AIR FORCE • MARINE 

UNIFORMS 

Tailors to the Trade 
for over 30 years 



17 Maryland Avenue Annapolis, Md. 

Phone COIonial 3-3484 



CONGRATULATIONS . . . and GOOD LUCK! 

KLEIN, MULLER & HORTON. INC. 
Silverware • Watches • Diamonds • Jewelry 

21 Maiden Lane, New York 38, N. Y. 
COrtlandt 7-4590 

Wherever you may be ... if you have need of our services ... we stand ready to be helpful. 



594 



ANNAPOLIS 


THEATRES 


Presenting the BEST it 


i Motion Pictures 


Direction, F. H. Durkee Enterprises 


Annapolis, Maryland 


DAVID 0. COLBURN, 


Resident Manager 



ACADEMY BLAZER 




Hand tailored of fine 100% virgin wool blue flannel in 
two or three button single breasted style. 

Hand embroidered naval academy crest in gold bullion. 
Gold plated buttons. 

Also available in charcoal grey flannel. 



LOWE TAILORS, INC. 



56 Maryland Ave. 



COlonial 3-4361 



HOSPITALITY HEADQUARTERS 




Serving the Academy Since 1896 



The Finest Service . . . 

in Life Insurance and Estate Planning is deserved by the career Officers of our Navy, Marine Corps and 
Air Force. Therefore we cherish with a keen sense of pride the reputation gained through more than 
twenty-six years of distinguished work in this field,- we appreciate the privilege ot rendering the finest 
service to the Service's finest; and we pledge this continuing responsibility to our newest policyholders 
in the Class of 1956. 



Louis P. Kraus 

Representative 

Life Member — Million Dollar Round Table 

N. A. L. U. 



H. Richard Duden 



Representative 

NA '47 



NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY 

49 Maryland Avenue, Annapolis, Md. 



595 



To the Naval Academy Graduating Class: 

On the broad shoulders of you young men about to graduate from the Navy Academy 
lies a heavy responsibility. We feel confident that you will perform your duty in keep- 
ing with the high standard of the Naval Academy and the highest traditions of the 
Naval Service. 

PUGET SOUND BRIDGE & DREDGING CO. 

1020 East Marginal Way • Seattle, Washington 



Over 260,000 officers 
insure with 
confidence in 




United Services Automobile 
Association, organized in 1922, 
is the largest insurance com- 
pany exclusively serving officers 
of the U. S. Armed Forces with 
insurance at cost. 

All selling is by mail. You enjoy 
protection almost anywhere in 
the world where U. S. Armed 
Forces serve. 



Save more 
than 40% 
on Auto 
Insurance 



Save 

more than 
25% on 
Household 
Effects 
Insurance 



UNITED SERVICES 

AUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION 

USAA BuildiiK. 411! Bioidwiy. Sin Antonio 5. Tun 





CLASS OF 56 




MEMBERS OF PREVIOUS CLASSES 
ON THE FSFC STAFF 



• Allen P. Mullinnix 

• Peter P. Rodes 



1920 
1913 



federal %ervices f 



AND AFFILIATES 
Washington 6, D. C. 






For top performance use 



CITIES ©SERVICE 

MARINE LUBRICANTS • DIESEL FUELS • MOTOR OILS • GASOLENES 



CITIES SERVICE OIL CO. SIXTY WALL TOWER NEW YORK 5, N. Y. 



596 




N APPROVED PACKING 

r Stern Tube and Ship Propeller 





Ankorite standard 853 is a packing specially constructed 
to meet Specification MIL-P-16374-A, designed for use on 
stern tubes and ship propellers. It is constructed of a tallow 
lubricated flax core spirally wrapped with a soft, metal foil. 

THE ANCHOR PACKING COMPANY 

GENERAL OFFICES: PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA 

Branches and Warehouses in all Industrial Centers 




KEARFOTT COMPANY, INC. 

Little Falls, N. J. 

SALES and ENGINEERING OFFICES 

1378 Main Avenue, Clifton, N. J. 



LEADERS IN 



• The design and production of precision airborne navigation systems, 
gyros and servo system components. 

• Engineering and manufacture of ship's windows and accessories 
since 1917. 



FederaLrm 




Serving the 

U. S. NAVY For Over 10 YEARS 

With COMMUNICATION and NAVIGATION 

EQUIPMENT 



m 



Federal Telephone and Radio Cbmpami 

A DIVISION OF IT&T 

100 KTNGSLAND ROAD, CLIFTON. N.J. 

In Canada: Standard Telephones and Cahles Mfg. Co. (Canada) Ltd.. Montreal, P. Q. 
Export Distributors: International Standard Electric Corp.. 67 Broad St.. N. Y. 



598 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Page 

\erofin Corporation 577 

\crojer-General Corporation 522 

lircraft Radio Corporation 573 

Alperstein's 566 

American Engineering Company 547 

American Express Company 505 

American Machine & Foundry 583 

American Society of Naval Engineers 547 

Anchor Packing Company 597 

Anderson Bros. Consolidated Co's 560 

Annapolis Banking and Trust Company. . . .591 

Annapolis Theatres 595 

Antoinette's Place 592 

Armed Forces Medical Aid Association 585 

Arrow -Hart &: Hegeman FLlectric Company. 568 

Arundel Corporation 544 

Associated Architects & Engineers 580 

Atlantis Sales Corporation 545 

Audio Productions, Inc 552 

Avco Manufacturing Corp 554 

Ayers-Hagan-Booth 563 

Bahcock and Wilcox Company 523 

Baier ix Ackerman, Inc 570 

Bailey Meter Company 562 

Baker, [ones, Hausauer, Inc 502, 503 

Bath I ron Works 563 

Baum, Russ 593 

Bearings Specialty Company 570 

Bell Aircraft Corp 528 

Bellevue-Srratford Hotel 558 

Bellingham Shipyards Company 589 

Belock Instrument Corp 562 

Bcndix Aviation Corporation 553 

Bennett Brothers 557 

Best Foods (Shinola) 545 

Bethlehem Steel Company 574 

Black Diamond Grit Company 569 

Byers Company, A. M 516 

California- Texas Oil Company 509 

Calvin Bullock 518 

Caldwell \ Company, J. E 559 

Campbell Company, George 591 

Camp Steel Company, E. V 571 

Capitol Radio Engineering Institute 582 

Carpel, Inc 593 

Carvel Hall 595 

Cash &: Company, J. & J 544 

Chance-Yought Aircraft, Inc 501 

Chesterfield Cigarettes 520 

Chevrolet 530 

Cities Service Oil Company 596 

Coca Cola Company 519 

Continental Motors Corporation 561 

Control Instrument Company 570 

(. onsolidated Vultee Aircraft 537 

Cornell Aeronautical Laboratories 554 

Cosmo Engineering Laboratories 540 

County Trust Company of Maryland 551 

Courtney & Company, John J 559 

Cresci & Son, Inc. A 589 

Crosbj Steam Gage & Valve Company 550 

Crosse ii Blackwell Company 593 

Darling Company, L. A 577 

Daystrom Instrument 578 

Deleco, Inc 569 

I >oane Company, L. C 576 

Douglas Aircraft Company 584 

I It ike Hosiery Corporation 560 

I lukeland Packing Company 592 

I lectronic Tube Corporation 561 

Fairchild Aircraft Division 521 

Fairchild Engine Division 506 

Farmers National Bank 567 



Page 

F'ederal Services Finance Corp 596 

Federal Telephone and Radio Co 598 

First National Bank of Scranton 567 

Flanigan, Loveland Tanker Company 541 

Flight Refueling, Inc 577 

F'lintkote Company 543 

Florsheim Company 545 

Flour City Ornamental Iron Co 568 

Flying Equipment Sales Company 549 

Fogleman-Jefferies 592 

Ford Instrument Company 573 

Ford Motor Company 534 

Fuller Brush Company 543 

Fulton Sylphon Division 542 

G. & J. Grill... : 592 

General Dynamics 507 

General Electronic Laboratories, Inc 569 

General Precision Equipment Corp 527 

General Motors 512 

Gerlinger Carrier Company 571 

Gibbs & Cox 540 

Gieves Limited 575 

Government Employees Insurance Co 567 

Grumman Aircraft Engineering Co 538, 539 

Hecht Company 591 

Herff- Jones Co." 594 

Hilborn-Hamberger, Inc 566 

Hoffman Laboratories 547 

Hoffman-Laroche, Inc. 5S1 

Holley Carburetor Company 562 

Holden Company, A. F ' 549 

Hotel Emerson 551 

Hotel St. Regis 551 

Hughes Aircraft Company 580 

Hunter Douglas Corporation 579 

Ingalls Shipbuilding Corp 578 

International Paint Company 568 

Johnson Lumber Company 591 

Josten's 500 

Kay Electric Company 576 

Kearfott Company Inc 598 

Kingsbury Machine Works 544 

Kingsport Press, Inc 572 

Klein, Muller, & Horton 594 

Koontz Creamery, Inc., H. E 556 

Krementz & Company 565 

Lee Uniform Cap Manufacturing Co 575 

Little Campus Inn 592 

Loral Electronics Corp 561 

Lowe Tailors, Inc 595 

Magnavox Company 565 

Marathon Battery 576 

Marbert Motors." . .594 

Martin Company, Glen L 508 

Maryland Hotel Supply 545 

Mason & Hanger-Silas Mason Co 552 

Massa Laboratories, Inc 552 

McKiernon-Terry Corporation 549 

Melvin & Hughes 591 

Meredith-Roane 592 

Merin Studios of Photography 535 

Merriam Company, G. & C 548 

Merritt-Chapman & Scott . .553 

Meyer Inc., N. S 556 

Moore-McCormack Lines 548 

Moran Towing & Transportation Co 550 

Motorola . . . 555 

Mullins Manufacturing Corporation 564 

Nanco, Inc 557 

National Publishing Company 581 



Page 

Navy Mutual Aid Association 546 

Newport News Shipbuilding Company 531 

Newsweek 590 

New York Dock Company 564 

New York Life Insurance 595 

Norris Candy Company 590 

North American Aviation Co 533 

North Carolina Granite Corp 543 

Northern Ordnance, Inc 540 

Pacific Pumps, Inc 536 

Peerless Uniforms 546 

Pepsi-Cola Bottling Company of Annapolis. 593 

Philco Corporation 511 

Pontiac Motor Division of General Motors 

Co 510 

Primus 594 

Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Co 596 

Radio Corporation of America 518 

Radio Receptor Company, Inc 576 

Reaction Motors 532 

Reeves Instrument Corp 578 

Reed's Sons, Jacob 514, 515 

Reis & Company, Robert 560 

Remington Rand, Inc 572 

Rheem Manufacturing Company 554 

Riggs National Bank 548 

Royal Restaurant 592 

Ruggles-Klingemann Mfg. Co 544 

Russell-Poling &: Company 568 

Sangamo Electric Company ^42 

Savannah Machine &: Foundry Co 541 

Seamen's Bank for Savings 558 

Severn School 591 

Sinclair Refining Company 550 

Smith Company, S. Morgan 564 

Smith Corporation, A. 555 

Socony Motor Oil Co 524 

Sound Apparatus Company 591 

Southern Photo Process Engraving Co. 504 

Spalding & Brothers 546 

Spence Engineering 549 

Sperry Gyroscope Company 529 

State Marine Lines 574 

Stehle, Beans & Bean 591 

Sprague Electric Company 542 

Stetson Shoe Company, Inc 525 

Stock Construction Corporation 543 

Strong Electric Corporation 569 

Stroukoff Aircraft Corporation 573 

Sullivan School 551 

Sylvania Electric Products 555 

Temco, Inc 571 

Tilghman Company 559 

Truland Corporation, Walter 592 

United Services Automobile Association. . . .596 

United States Naval Institution 513 

United States Rubber Company 526 

Universal Carloading & Distributing 

Co., Inc 580 

Universal Molded Products Corp 589 

Van Nostrand Company, Inc 558 

Verson Allsteel 542 

Vertol Aviation Corporation 586 

Walworth Corporation 586 

Waterbury Tool Company 563 

Waterman Products Company 561 

Wembley, Inc 560 

Willys Motors, Inc 587 

Woodward & Lothrop 566 

ZIV Television Programs 588 

Zodiac Watch Agency 556 



599 







&& 






M 



V 



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